XP Mode requirements

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by chattycathy, Nov 14, 2011.

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  1. chattycathy

    chattycathy Registered Member

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    I'm considering purchasing a new desktop computer and I am very confused. How can you tell if the new systems out there have what they need to support XP Mode when they don't say if they have the Virtualization Technology chip? I have read conflicting reports. One says your processor needs to have the chip-level virtualization installed and the bios needs to support it also. And, another report states that Microsoft has improved it so that we don't need the chip any longer. Which is true? I have old programs that won't work on my Windows 7 home edition laptop and I want to use them on my new desktop. Some of these programs can't be upgraded. What advise do you have for me?
     
  2. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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  3. chattycathy

    chattycathy Registered Member

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    Thank you JRViejo for your response. Yes, I have been trying to get compatibility mode to work with these programs on my laptop but even that doesn't make these programs work with Windows 7. That's why I am interested in XP Mode. Thanks for the link but I'm afraid it still doesn't answer my question as to how can we tell the desktop we're purchasing will meet these requirements when the retailer doesn't offer the information. I guess it's just a chance I will have to take. Thanks anyway.
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    There are two requirements. (1) The new computer must support Windows 7. And (2), Windows 7 must be the correct version. It is most likely any new computer will have Windows 7 installed, so Windows 7 support is not a problem. So from there, it all depends on the version of Windows 7 installed. See Compare Windows 7 Versions to see which ones support "Windows XP Mode".

    If the new computer comes with Home Premium, you can upgrade it to Pro or Ultimate with Windows 7 Upgrade Anytime.
     
  5. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    chattycathy, you're welcome! I thought it would be apparent that the link I provided mentioned "computers running Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate editions" as candidates for XP Mode, however, I'm glad that Bill_Bright provided additional documentation.

    Regarding Compatibility Mode, the key is to precisely know the Operating Systems that were used by your older programs, when selecting the mode. In the link I provided, Option 2 lets the Program Compatibility Wizard determine which one is best for that old program. I'm using various older programs in my Win7 PC and this feature was instrumental in getting them to run. Worth a try, if you haven't done so already.
     
  6. chattycathy

    chattycathy Registered Member

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  7. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    If you are buying a "new" computer, it will support Windows 7. So you will be good to go.
     
  8. WinOutreach4

    WinOutreach4 Registered Member

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  9. chattycathy

    chattycathy Registered Member

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    Thank you David! You have answered my question! I was going to get either Professional or Ultimate but, I thought I had better make sure of the hardware requirements before I purchased anything. I had read so many conflicting information and just thought the best way to find out which is really true was to go straight to the users of the product. Thanks again for answersing my question!
     
  10. Victek

    Victek Registered Member

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    Most (maybe all) new computers/processors are going to support hardware virtualization, but to be certain I would boot a store display model into the BIOS and check for the feature.

    Intel named its technology VT-x; AMD calls theirs AMD-V

    Note that it may be turned off by default so check when you get your new system.

    The confusion about whether or not hardware/BIOS support is necessary is caused by the fact that initially it was required and then Microsoft removed the requirement.

    FYI...Sounds like you already know that Win7 Pro/Ultimate gives you the free XP download you need to create an XP virtual machine. If you already have a license for XP though you would not need Win7 Pro/Ultimate, you could use Win7 Home Premium with VirtualBox (free from Oracle). That could save you some money if that's a concern.
     
  11. chattycathy

    chattycathy Registered Member

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    Thank you Victek123 for your information also. I really do appreciate everyone's help!
     
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