Working with an Archive question

Discussion in 'FirstDefense-ISR Forum' started by twl845, Apr 15, 2007.

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  1. twl845

    twl845 Registered Member

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    Hi folks, I'm still learning FDISR from the trial copy. I successfully created an archive and located it on an external drive. It says you can't boot to an archive, so there it is on the external drive sitting there. I can't find any directions that tell me what to do with an archive once I've got one. If I need it at some point in time, how do I transform it to a snapshot and move it to the C drive so I can boot to it? Or do I move it as is to the C drive and then some how transform it to a snapshot? I'm no techi, so please try to explain in a way a dummy can understand. Thanks :D
     
  2. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    You can use it a couple of ways.

    I am assuming it is an archive of your primary snapshot. I am also assuming you have 1 additional snapshot secondary

    1) while in the primary snapshot you can do a copy/update and create a new snapshot by using the archive as source, and selecting new snapshot and give it a name. That will create a brand new bootable snapshot.

    2) What I do which is say I am going to try new software. I first do a copy/update from my primary snapshot, to the primary archive. Then if I want to get rid of it, I boot to my secondary snapshot, and do a copy/update from the primary archive, to the primary snapshot. Then boot back to the primary snapshot, which is now back like when I started.

    THis should give you the concept.

    Pete
     
  3. twl845

    twl845 Registered Member

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    Peter2150, Thanks, I think I get it now.:)
     
  4. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    An archived snapshot can be used as a rollback snapshot, if your secondary bootable snapshot can't be used as a rollback snapshot anymore.

    FDISR starts with a bootable work snapshot and a bootable rollback snapshot, but that doesn't mean you have to keep it that way. That's the magic of FDISR, you can improvise until your imagination can't handle it anymore.
    The longer you use FDISR, the more benefits you will discover, just give it time.

    There is only one golden rule : never work with only one snapshot in FDISR, always have a second snapshot where you can reboot, if your work snapshot is in trouble.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2007
  5. twl845

    twl845 Registered Member

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    ErikAlbert, Thanks for the info. My only restriction on my computer HD is the 70GB of total workable space with 28GB of used space with my primary and secondary snapshots included. My external HD is 160 GB so doing archives to is has no limitation.
     
  6. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I understand and you are right.
     
  7. EASTER.2010

    EASTER.2010 Guest

    And therein lies the chief overwhelming factor for any and all users who have make the turn for this FirstDefense Super-Recovery project. I'm almost Gah Gah over this and could kick myself a hundred times over for not putting stock in this much sooner before now.
    Finally, you can fashion snapshots individually for so many very useful purposes and when you find yourself at any point in your excitement over this & thinking that it's just simply too good to be true, get your image programs running and store that drive, several times if needed for conscience sake. I finally can peel off but a single snapshot of many, with all my heavy-duty Google-Earth files plus tons of overlays (kmz,kml) i lost back on 98SE a few years back, and Copy/Update to Archives Off and ON disk and never have to be concerned with suffering such another loss again.

    For me, and in spite of all my time invested in malware research projects, those Google-Earth projects i spent months putting together plus all my Artifical Intelligence projects "NOW" have a secure base of safety from being eraticated like before, and this FD opens up a MONUMENTAL door to the best safekeeping of data/projects i have ever found. Can i not ever cease from this new confidence to be experienced and just what this means to everyone who now can finally experience this for themselves & just how extremely beneficial technology can be when fashioned in the likes of this type of recovery system thats been designed for us courtesy Leapfrog/Raxco?

    It's now highly worth to invest in another hard drive of some higher capacity plus extra external/internal drives to make space for this program and a place to keep your snaps & archives safe and sound. I hope i didn't wander too far off topic for this thread but i couldn't help it seeing how EVERYONE is now turning attention to space availability and focusing in on setting up additional space which will prove invaluable when taking advantage of FD's feature-rich and life/time-saving featutes of stockpiling separate configurations they put so much time into developing for their uses.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 15, 2007
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