Wireless Internet Set-Up ? Can this be done and how?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by hawki, May 19, 2015.

  1. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    I need some help please :)

    I have been living in a condo unit that I have rented from the owner for several years and the owner is selling it so I have had to find a new place to live. I am moving next week.

    I have been informed that the owners of the unit I am moving into are a retired Navy Captain and a persnickety, "prim and proper" Brit.(no offense intended) that come to the Unit to do a "White Glove" inspection every three or four months. Just what I need! I'm sure I will only be there for only a year if they don't try to throw me out before that :)

    I have also been told that the Navy Capt went nuts when he saw the former tenant's internet set up. OMG! The installer actually ran the coax neatly around the base board of the unit. How horrible ! The Captain thought it looked messy and actually ripped it up. :) In my old place, the installer lifted a part of the rug and ran the coax under a small part of it to avoid having to run an additional 50+ feet of additional coax around another room to reach the wall of where I have my PC. I have no doubt that The Captain would never allow that. If I had known all this before I signed a lease I never would have rented the place, but it's too late for that now. He's probably gonna dislike me in any event. I was not in the military (I have serious authority issues and would surely have wound up in the brig for 30 years.) - never enlisted and during the draft days during the Vietnam War I got a 1-Y exemption cuz of a knee seriously mangled by years of playing football (though I admit to running a long distance the day of my draft physical, occasionally banging my knee with a hard rubber headed mallet) and later drew #346 in the "Draft Lottery.

    I'm also gonna have enough problems with the LL cuz my place is usually "bachelor" clean, i.e., I would not invite the Queen of England for dinner and eat off of the bathroom floor and drink water from the tub. I think you must get the picture.

    What would I have to do to run some kind of wireless device at the current coax outlet of the unit that could "broadcast" a high-speed internet connection (130 Mbps) signal to my modem, router, PC or whatever? I currently use a direct cable connection to my modem and do not use a router. The modem is wired to the ethernet input on my PC. My PC has a built-in high-speed wireless LAN (802.11ac), whatever that is. Can this be done without another PC to run a wireless network from the coax connection?I do not know anything about this as I never have had a network at home and have always used a direct wired connection to my modem with no router.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
  2. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    You could try a Powerline system, or a combined Powerline/wifi system, like this one:

    TP-LINK TL-WPA4220KIT ADVANCED 300Mbps Universal WiFi Range Extender, Repeater, AV500 Powerline Edition, WiFi Clone Button, 2 LAN Ports.

    In your case, connect the small terminal to the modem and plug it in a wall electrical outlet. This puts the Ethernet signal in the apartment´s electrical wiring. Then plug the big terminal in a wall outlet where you want to have the Ethernet or wifi access point.

    Note: I´m not sure it this system would work connected directly to a modem and not to a router.
     
  3. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    All you need is a router. You computer already has a wifi card (That's the 'built-in high-speed wireless LAN') and it can operate at the AC specification so you're going to want a router that can broadcast an AC signal, especially if you want to get as much of your 130mbps as possible The setup would just go Coax cable > Modem > Ethernet cable > Router.
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    A "wireless router" to be specific since a "router" is Ethernet only. A wireless router is an integrated device that contains a router, a WAP (wireless access point) and 4-port Ethernet switch in the same box.

    The coaxial cable from your ISP will connect to the cable input side of the modem, and the wireless router to the modem's WAN port, and your computers to the router via wifi or Ethernet.

    Or you may be able to use a wireless modem/router - an integrated device like the wireless router that also has the modem integrated into the same box.

    I am not a fan of powerline networking. I have seen too many problems, especially in older homes with older wiring and outlets. If a new home, or the wiring and outlets have recently been brought up to code, then they are an adequate alternative. Plus, since your computer already has a wifi adapter, you might as well use it.

    Not a good idea. Adding even the most basic Ethernet router adds a HUGE layer of security to your network. Every user should be behind a router, even if they only have one computer.

    When connecting, be sure to unplug the power connector to your computer before starting. This ensures all standby voltages that may be keeping any current network setting "alive" are removes so [hopefully] when you connect and power up, your new IP (from the router) will assigned with no problems.
     
  5. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    LOL: Thanks for your help but I'm a bit confused:)

    What connects to the coax output Jack?

    Ok, so I have a Wi Fi Card. Would I still need to plug something into the PC to receive the Wi Fi Signal?

    Really need "Wireless From Coax Output Jack for Dummies."
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2015
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    The coax cable connects to the modem's input.

    That's what the card is for. The card allows the PC to connect to a WAP (wireless access point) on your network. While you can buy a separate WAP to add wireless to an Ethernet network, most WAPs today are integrated with a router - hence "wireless router".

    Understand, even if in the same box as the router, a WAP is technically a separate network device that "adds" wireless access to your network. With a separate WAP, the WAP would connect via an Ethernet cable to an Ethernet port on your router. But with an integrated WAP, the WAP is connected to the router via an internal Ethernet port.

    In fact, even the 4 Ethernet ports on the back of a typical router are part of an Ethernet "switch" and that switch is technically a discrete, separate network device. So the router, WAP and 4-port Ethernet switch are technically 3 discrete network devices that just happen to be integrated into the same case to save space and money by using the same circuit board, same case and same power supply.

    And some of these integrated device include the modem too. Four discrete devices but in the same boxes.

    The is the same as an audio "receiver" is an integrated device that contains the pre-amplifier, amplifier, and tuner in the same box. Or how motherboards today have integrated sound cards, network cards, and often video cards too. Separate device that just happen to share motherboard space.

    Clear as mud, huh?
     
  7. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    Thanks all for your help. I think I got it. Cox tells me all I need is a wireless modem and a PC-USB adapter to connect to my card. Hope they are right. I could use a newer modem so that is not a major concern.

    You will probably never hear from me again cuz I have no idea how to set up a wireless connection/network on Windows 8.1 :)
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Whato_O

    If you have a wifi adapter card, you don't need a PC-USB adapter. The wifi adapter card will connect to the wireless modem (or wireless router, or WAP). That is what the card is for.
     
  9. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    Thanks Bill :)

    The only ISP approved wireless modems available to me nearby are combo modems and wireless routers in the same box. The instructions say to 1) Connect The Modem/router to your coax connection 2) Connect the Modem/router to your PC with an ethernet cable. It's step 2) that I am trying to avoid. My new landlord doesn't want a cable running from the coax jack to my PC - he says "Its too messy" Yeah. Really.

    If I do not connect the ethernet cable to my PC will I get a wireless internet signal from the modem? The ethernet connection to the pc from the modem/router is for an additional purpose??

    They are like this:

    http://www.arrisi.com/modems/datasheet/SBG6782/SBG6782_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2015
  10. jwcca

    jwcca Registered Member

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    You probably have to 'set up' the router by first connecting it via ethernet, configuring the wireless and then disconnect the ethernet and move the router close to the co-ax cable and hook it up. That's what I had to do anyway...
     
  11. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Yes, jwcca is correct. You need to first setup the wireless side of your router/modem via Ethernet - that is, rename your network/SSID and set a strong wireless passphrase so only authorized devices can connect to your wireless networks.

    Once you have the SSID and new passphrase set, then you can setup your PC and other wireless devices (notebooks, cell phones, Roku streamers, game stations, smart TVs, etc.) to connect to your wireless network.
     
  12. whitedragon551

    whitedragon551 Registered Member

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    A cable modem connects to the coax cable. Then use the ethernet port on the cable modem to plug into your wireless router. There are 2 pieces of equipment needed.

    Typically you can check with your ISP on what cable modems are compatible with their service.
     
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