Windows 7 End of Life – Former Windows users unlikely to migrate to Linux en-masse

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by mood, Jan 15, 2020.

  1. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    Many Windows users that do not need to run any Windows specific apps, could do everything they use their computers for now, with Linux. However, the majority of them are most likely happy to keep using Windows, so they've got no interest in changing OS. It doesn't matter if Linux is faster and more secure, if they do don't want to switch.

    Personally, for my daily use, I could use Linux instead of Windows. But Windows works so well, I have no reason to ditch it.
     
  2. Azure Phoenix

    Azure Phoenix Registered Member

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    Same. I'm happy with Windows 10. I have zero reason to even try any Linux.
     
  3. Circuit

    Circuit Registered Member

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    Land o fruits and nuts, and more crime.
    I have zero reasons to upgarde to Windows 10.
    Tried it, not for me.
    Linux next destination.
     
  4. Gringo95

    Gringo95 Registered Member

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    Slight bit of misinformation here.

    To start with the majority of Linux distros have a live session option so potential Windows migrants can download however many desktop variants they like and try these out without interfering with their installed Windows system. So some reviewers personal preferences are not at all relevant except maybe to be a starting point based on the images they've looked at.

    Also there's no need to download anything in the sense inferred here because whatever Linux package manager is included will perform the whole operation including installation of single or multiple programs all at the same time. You just select what you want click to install and enter your password. Not exactly rocket science, no hidden ads, no 'gotcha' installations of unwanted software or stuff messing with your browser and system settings.

    Screensavers are no longer relevant for modern screens but if one is not included by default and they must have one the process for adding it can be found via Google in 10 seconds assuming users are not so indoctrinated into the Windows way they cannot search for "screensaver" in their Linux package manager.

    https://imgur.com/5bMJ5qg
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  5. longshots

    longshots Registered Member

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    Wow, really. This must be the 10,000th time I've seen that statement in this forum.
    Yet many people still like to use one - why is it so?
    I'm very sorry, I didn't realise that EVERY Linux package manager has a screensaver option - my bad!
    I can't find mine on Kubuntu though - please explain.

    I still think that for the majority of users moving from Windows to Linux it's like going from an automatic drive car to a 19 speed Road Ranger gearbox - if you know what that is.
     
  6. Circuit

    Circuit Registered Member

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    Your opinion, no luck with that, tried Mint, Peppermint, Ubuntu.
    The easiest is mint, no hassle with drivers. Peppermint was ok.
    Zorin displayed an installation screen guessing 800x600 so couldn't see the OK, and Cancel buttons, just the very edge.
    Waste of a DVD. Then the Nvidia driver would not load.
    Not at all good for a beginner.
    Mint is my choice after trying the above. For people leaving Windows.
    Glad I didn't plunk the $'s for Zorin.
     
  7. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    Debian gave me issues with realtek wifi drivers, although I battled through it like slogging through quicksand to install them. Not everyone wants to exert the time and effort for something as must-have as wifi drivers are. This type of hurdle will discourage many beginners for good.
     
  8. Krusty

    Krusty Registered Member

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    I've tried a few distros now but I keep going back to Linux Mint Cinnamon. It is simple, looks nice and just works.
     
  9. Gringo95

    Gringo95 Registered Member

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    Overall Windows has far better hardware support out of the box than Linux and this especially applies to Nvidia and wifi although Nvidia issues are common with Windows too as a quick glance in the Nvidia forms demonstrates. Printers and touchpads can also give problems. Being a long time Linux user I purposely chose only hardware with Intel graphics so I don’t have this particular problem. The 5 machines I have in regular use all connect to my wifi network but with varying degrees of nuisance issues depending on which Linux version they have installed. To overcome this I bought a D-Link wifi adapter several years ago that works with everything and I now use this irrespective of what wifi card might be included by default. Specific cards, especially those in some notebooks, are known to have issues with Linux but the solutions are well documented in Linux forums although this isn’t a lot of good unless you have a spare working machine or access to a cable connection. Agreed users should not need to be forced down this road but considering the time most people spend on social media a few minutes of that spent in the forums instead will mostly achieve the desired result.

    Again the benefit of live session Linux use whereby most of any potential issues will be obvious before deciding on a full install.
     
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