Why aren't people using Comodo Time Machine?

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by TheMozart, Jan 6, 2012.

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  1. CyberMan969

    CyberMan969 Registered Member

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    And you are still not learning...

    If you do a raw (AKA sector-by-sector) backup of a disk that contains RX or CTM, all snapshots will be backed-up too. A thorough google search would let you know that much, and more. A lot of people do raw backups it all the time in order to preserve their snapshots (and I do it too).

    Stop showing yourself up. Ignorance is not pretty. You should learn to accept the truth and try to learn more, rather than complain to the people who let you know of things that you are oblivious about.

    Peace!
     
  2. The Red Moon

    The Red Moon Registered Member

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    I am sorry to burst in on this party.

    from what i understand if comodo time machine is installed then restoring a image is not possible due to the MBR modification.
    That is the nature of the beast.

    If CTM does not uninstall completely then there is a chance of corruption,so a copy of your MBR would be a good start.

    I never used this program for long but i do recall issues when removing it.
    It seems to be an abandoned product now so i think it would be unwise to use it until an update of some sort has been issued.

    Thanks.
     
  3. CyberMan969

    CyberMan969 Registered Member

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    Hi Amiga

    You seem like a knowledgable user and you most probably know what I am about to say, but I will say it for the benefit of others.

    If users have taken a backup of their Windows disk before installing CTM/RX and MBR problems occur, then they have these options:

    1) Repair the MBR only. This can be done with a Windows start-up media, or simply by restoring the MBR and track0 only from a previously taken pre-CTM/RX backup. I use an Acronis True Image bootable media for this task, but you can always use another backup app, for as long as it gives you the option to backup/restore the MBR and track0, and provides you with a bootable media (for cases where Windows won't boot). Restoring just the MBR/track0 in this manner will take one second, and the computer will be bootable again. You can then uninstall CTM/RX.

    2) Fully overwrite the faulty volume with your pre-CTM/RX backup, this will obviously bring the system back to the exact state it was when the backup was taken, with no RX/CTM installed anymore. This is the best course of action if the MBR corruption happened while or after uninstalling RX or CTM. This will bring the system back to the day it was backed up, so essentially you get the system reverted to the state it was before CTM or RX were installed.

    3) If you have already taken a raw (sector-by-sector) backup of a CTM or RX disk when everything was OK, then this backup will also contain all the snapshots that you had when the backup was taken. If the MBR gets screwed in the future and you still want to preserve your existing snapshots, then all you have to do is load your backup start-up media and restore just your MBR/track0. This will make the PC bootable again and RX/CTM will work exactly like before. Best thing: Because you will only be restoring the MBR, all your recent snapshots (that were created after the raw backup was taken) will be preserved too. It takes a mere second to restore the MBR in this manner.

    If you don't care about your recent snapshots, you always can overwrite the whole volume, sector-by-sector, with your raw backup - but I see no point in doing that. This will obviously kill all the snapshots that were created after the backup was taken, and you'll end up having only the snapshots you had when the raw backup was taken. It's much faster and easier to restore just the MBR/track0, and on the next reboot open the CTM/RX pre-boot console and manually delete any newer snapshots that you no longer want.

    Bottom line:

    If CTM/RX is installed then restoring an image is 100% possible regardless of the MBR modification. You just need a start-up disk containing your favorite backup app, which should be able to backup/restore the MBR and track0 (most modern backup apps do that, some are even free). Provided of course that you had the presence of mind to take a raw backup when everything was OK.

    These are all things that I have learned on my own via google, and also by asking people nicely at forums. I have never stormed into a forum claiming that a program screwed up my PC; and if I ever would, I'd make damn sure to check my facts out before posting non-truths, like blaster did. The craziest thing is that they guy didn't even think to make a simple copy of his personal stuff (pics, docs etc.) on a USB stick beforehand. He only had a single copy, and when his MBR was screwed he re-installed Windows overwriting everything, instead of using another machine to thoroughly google the problem. I mean, how illogical is that?? If that was his only computer he could have walked into an internet cafe, spend a couple of hours researching the issue and he would have found the answers.

    The thing is that he now thinks that I'm attacking him personally. This couldn't be further from the truth. All I'm saying to the guy is this: google, check your facts, learn before commiting yourself openly with ignorant statements. Nobody likes to be told that they are wrong, especially when it happens openly in a forum; and it only makes them more annoyed and embarassed when they themselves know that they have showed themselves up with silly inaccurate statements.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  4. The Red Moon

    The Red Moon Registered Member

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    Thank you cyberman for your excellent and thorough explanation.
     
  5. CyberMan969

    CyberMan969 Registered Member

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    You're welcome bro.

    The most important thing to remember is to never trust a single piece of media with your valuable data. Make at least two copies of everything you value, one of which should be stored away from the computer. Make sure you use good quality storage media; this is especially true for DVD blanks. The Verbatim DVD+R brand uses one of the top optical disc dyes, those are the ones I've always used in the past wth minimal failure rates. If you shop around for discs google for the dye code (for Verbatim DVD+R the code is MCC 004). Make sure you verify the DVDs after burning (ImgBurn is a good free proggie to use). Also buy good quality USB sticks (SanDisk is my top brand), and avoid the cheaper knock-offs.

    Never go cheap with the media that will hold your valuable irreplaceable data.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
  6. Keatah

    Keatah Registered Member

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    I don't use it because I have a solution that already works.
     
  7. sdmod

    sdmod Shadow Defender Expert

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    This is excellent advice for any PC user with important data to prevent that (avoidable) moment of shock, pale face and tears.
    I would just add to store your dvds well and cleanly out of direct heat or sunlight, fingerprint, dust and grit (not just piled up) and maybe make two copies of anything important.
    I regularly backup clone my entire system to second drive within the pc and also to usb removable drive which I store safely away from magnets, television, direct sunlight, central heating radiators, headphones etc.

    When all that's done your motherboard will suddenly go pop! ;)


     
  8. CyberMan969

    CyberMan969 Registered Member

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    +1 +1

    If the mobo goes south, then you better pray that your insurance company will cover you for it!
     
  9. taotoo

    taotoo Registered Member

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    I can vouch for that one - I ended up with a tower of melted together plastic.
     
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