Which Security Work with Each Other?

Discussion in 'other anti-malware software' started by Positive_Impact, Aug 28, 2008.

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  1. Positive_Impact

    Positive_Impact Registered Member

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    I been advised many times to not depend on security suites or one lone security software that can do it all.

    As a result, I am in the process of selecting a variety of security software that covers firewall, spamware, spyware, etc.

    I am facing a dilemma...How do I know I have selected a collection of compatible applications? In the other words, how can I tell if the various malware software I select and download are able to work together without interfering with each others’ ability to protect my computer?
     
  2. EliteKiller

    EliteKiller Registered Member

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  3. Kees1958

    Kees1958 Registered Member

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    First do some searching of the earlier provided thread of the combo's you might want to select.

    Next, install each of your preferred applications seperately (so app A only, remove app A and install app B, remove app B, install app C). Check for every app individually which hooks they set on SSDT (using AVZ for instance).

    Choose the combo with the least of overlap.

    Install your selected combo and trail for a while.

    Regards Kees
     
  4. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    Suggestion: choose complementary security software, a layered defense.

    The weakest point in a security setup is the person behind the computer. Don't download software unless you're sure it's safe.
    Don't click on links unless you're sure it's safe. Especially sponsored search results.
    If it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

    Use a piece of software that indicates whether a webpage is safe. For example, SiteAdvisor. If you get a warning, don't go there. If the tool indicates a website is safe, don't assume it is.

    Internet browser: I've never tried Firefox, only IE 7. Choose above-average security settings for all zones. Block indirect/third party cookies. Don't allow autocomplete for anything but webpages/URLS.

    Don't install Java (not the same as Javascript). Make sure you don't have any outdated software with vulnerabilities on your PC.
    Stay alert, people will try to scam/infect you.

    Use imaging software (Acronis ?) and hardware, for the latter an external harddisk that you unplug when you're not creating or restoring an image. In case of doubt, use it.

    The rest: there are many valid approaches. For example, antivirus, antispyware (with real-time protection, one or more programs). A good firewall, it doesn't have to be leaktest-proof. Don't use out-of-the-box settings. Pay attention to possible conflicts, configure the software as well as you can. Some people like to use a HIPS, but that can be complicated.
    Often the vendor offers a free trial.

    'I am facing a dilemma...How do I know I have selected a collection of compatible applications? In the other words, how can I tell if the various malware software I select and download are able to work together without interfering with each others’ ability to protect my computer?'

    Think carefuly, use a complementary approach. And you'll have to try what works and what doesn't, there is no substitute for experimentation. For this experimentation, imaging software is very convenient, if something goes wrong, just restore a previous image.

    Don't just believe whatever a software vendor says. There is no 100 % safety.
     
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