Which Router??

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Wills, Nov 30, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Wills

    Wills Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Posts:
    146
    Location:
    Canada
    We finally have high speed phone connection and I am looking at wired routers.
    I have no need for a wireless model.
    I am presently looking at either the Linksys or Alpha Shield.
    I hope to hear from members regarding these models or others.
    The office techie told me that Alpha Shield was good and did the job well.
    Any and all comments would be appreciated.

    (I apologize if I have posted in the wrong place, I was uncertain where this topic should go.)
    Respectful regards.
     
  2. InfinityAz

    InfinityAz Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Posts:
    828
    Location:
    Arizona
    Even though you're not looking for a wireless router, here's a good article at Tom's Hardware comparing the current crop of MIMO routers.

    You should be able to find additional router reviews at Tom's also. They do a very good job.
     
  3. Blackspear

    Blackspear Global Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2002
    Posts:
    15,115
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
    We use and sell a lot of the Netgear DG834 Modem/Router/Firewall's due to quality, reliability, warranty and 24/7 tech support. Simple to set up, simple to use.

    Hope this helps...

    Cheers :D
     
  4. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Posts:
    1,015
    Location:
    California
    You may also want to look at routers with built-in print servers, like the Netgear FR114P
     
  5. Arup

    Arup Guest

    Please add ICSA certified quality routers from USR, CISCO, Multi Tech and Zyxel to your list, all depends on your use, most average routers choke with heavy duty gaming and P2P, especially if their firewall features are turned on, they run out of memory and start dropping connections.
     
  6. adrianyujs

    adrianyujs Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Posts:
    138
    Location:
    Kuala Lumpur
    Better use Aztech DSL 600EW... good stuff
     
  7. wolf_xl

    wolf_xl Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Posts:
    48
    I'm experiencing huge network slowdowns and frequent signal dropouts caused by bitorrent which did not happen 6 months ago. It's come to the point where I've had enough and am looking for a router that can handle bittorrent and preferably come with Qos so that I can allow certain uses priority over the bandwidth.

    So far I've come up with the D-link DI-634m and Zyxel X-550 both are MIMO and support Qos. But I have no idea whether they are anygood with regards to bitorrent.

    I'm really stuck, should I go with one of these or are there other cable modems I should be considering?
     
  8. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Posts:
    23,873
    Location:
    SW. Oklahoma
    Personally I won't use any router but a Linksys. Have used them a while now (years) and have never had any issues with a linksys router. There are other good routers available but this is the one I with out question recommend, Wired or Wireless.

    bigc
     
  9. Arup

    Arup Guest

    The D-Link and Zyxel support huge number of connections in their NAT and thats the most important aspect in case you wish to do P2P, otherwise, no use upgrading as you will get the same performance.
     
  10. wolf_xl

    wolf_xl Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Posts:
    48
    Well I like to download alot of anime fansubs and these typicly have a huge number of peers. I'm not after any massive performance increase just no more signal dropouts and network slowdowns because of bitorrent. So both D-link and Zyxel will be suitable for my needs because they support a huge number of NAT connections? Incedently which supports more? I know they booth use simialr QoS technology.
     
  11. doug6949

    doug6949 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2003
    Posts:
    110
    Linksys doesn't have a very good reputation for reliability or customer support. But the routers are cheap and generally install without any drivers, software or fuss. Just plug it in and throw away the CD.

    My BESFR41 died after about a year. Replaced it with a BESFX41. It is still running after a year. You can't ask for a better inbound firewall for the money. If it dies I'll buy another one.
     
  12. Arup

    Arup Guest


    They both use same CPU and have same memory count so get the one which offers you the best deal.
     
  13. nod32.9

    nod32.9 Guest

    D Link 624 is a cheap and reliable router with okay support. The Cisco products tend to cost more. If you're going to spend more $, then it's hard to beat Buffalo...may modes that you can configure.
     
  14. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Posts:
    9,455
  15. Arup

    Arup Guest

    Guys,

    Wolf is looking for P2P use which needs heavy number of NAT connections, so the only ones that can do it is the ones that are listed above designed for heavy duty P2P work with 16000 connection bandwidth, the other routers peak with 100 connections max.
     
  16. wolf_xl

    wolf_xl Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Posts:
    48
    Thanks guys for your input but Arups right I need a router that can handle heavy P2P connections.

    I've been looking at the gamming router D-link DGL-4300 it looks like a very similar in features to the DI-634m (apart from the gigaport) and according to the literature is supposed to be able to handle P2P. It's more expensive than the 634m so does that mean it has better hardware for e.g. more memory to handle connections?
     
  17. isnogood

    isnogood Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Posts:
    83
    Location:
    France
    Not sure about memory amount, but certainly a good hardware. DGL-4300 has a very good Ubicom IP3023 routing CPU, able to deal with that amount of connections. The special technology is used for QoS to optimize upload bandwidth for gaming, useful also with VoiP.
    Don't know if upload is most important for P2P, but the fast chip is essential to mainain large NAT bandwidth with firewall ON and good speed. Another thing, as you said, is the Gigabyte switch in place of the 100Mb.

    isnogood
     
  18. wolf_xl

    wolf_xl Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Posts:
    48
    Thanks for the reply guys. I'm going with the DGL-4300 as it seems to be quite highly regarded and can do the heavy duty NAT that I need.

    Cheers :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2005
  19. _petati_

    _petati_ Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Posts:
    1
    Does DGL-4300 support ADSL? (DSL is not the same as ADSL...). Sorry for the silly question, but I want to be completly sure.
    ty
     
  20. Arup

    Arup Guest

    Yes it does......using it on a 4mbps ADSL here:)
     
  21. adrianyujs

    adrianyujs Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Posts:
    138
    Location:
    Kuala Lumpur
    When you connect to the Internet, you might connect through a regular modem, through a local-area network connection in your office, through a cable modem or through a digital subscriber line (DSL) connection. DSL is a very high-speed connection that uses the same wires as a regular telephone line.


    Here are some advantages of DSL:

    * You can leave your Internet connection open and still use the phone line for voice calls.
    * The speed is much higher than a regular modem
    * DSL doesn't necessarily require new wiring; it can use the phone line you already have.
    * The company that offers DSL will usually provide the modem as part of the installation.

    But there are disadvantages:

    * A DSL connection works better when you are closer to the provider's central office.
    * The connection is faster for receiving data than it is for sending data over the Internet.
    * The service is not available everywhere.

    ADSL stand for asymmetric digital subscriber line, a new technology that allows more data to be sent over existing copper telephone lines (POTS). ADSL supports data rates of from 1.5 to 9 Mbps when receiving data (known as the downstream rate) and from 16 to 640 Kbps when sending data (known as the upstream rate).

    ADSL requires a special ADSL modem.

    ADSL is growing in popularity as more areas around the world gain access.
     
  22. Arup

    Arup Guest

    ADSL2 is rated at 24mbps and 10mbps ADSL is now a standard in UK households.
     
  23. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2004
    Posts:
    1,976
    Location:
    Eastern PA, USA
    Sorry to get OT but just wanted to say "hats off" to the rest of the world out there. The U.S. is embarrassingly backward in the realm of high speed internet access. I guess somebody likes to see us kept fat, dumb, and happy.:mad:
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.