Which imaging software would you recommand for Linux?

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by mattdocs12345, Jan 23, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Posts:
    1,785
    Location:
    US
    As the title states. What imaging software would you recommand for Linux laptops. I woud prefer something that's easy to use, not bloated and reliable.
    For Windows I used to have Macrium Reflect, but that was for Windows. Now I haved moved to a new OS and need some feedback here.
     
  2. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Posts:
    7,786
    I can recommend Clonezilla for linux, I've been using it a lot and it works quite well.
     
  3. The Red Moon

    The Red Moon Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Posts:
    3,872
    I use clonezilla live cd version and it works flawlessly.It restores an image of my linux mint installation in 3.5 minutes.
     
  4. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    TeraByte's Image for Linux. It will backup/restore non OS partitions from Linux but the OS backup/restore has to be done offline. Supports wired and wireless networks. Supports restoring to dissimilar hardware, images in TrueCrypt containers, contains TBOSDT for disk and partition operations. Optional GUI or scripted image/restore. File Manager. Copy Physical drive to a Virtual HD file.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  5. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Posts:
    1,785
    Location:
    US
    Okay so I got Terabyte and Clonezilla here. Anybody can tell me how many failed restores did you get per ~100?
     
  6. napoleon1815

    napoleon1815 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Posts:
    702
    With TB for Linux? Zero.
     
  7. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    mattdocs12345,

    I've done over 10000 restores with various apps and only seen one failed restore. But I doubt it was the fault of the software as the target HD failed about an hour later.
     
  8. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Posts:
    7,786
    I've done maybe 50 restores over time with Clonezilla on linux, and zero failures. However, using Clonezilla for Win imaging resulted in problems. For linux however, it seems pretty flawless... it's light and pretty easy to use also.
     
  9. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Posts:
    2,566
    I have done hundreds of backup/restores with both Terabyte and clonezilla. Both of them have never failed to restore (on systems that did not have bad ram modules).

    ps. For me if an imaging app (version of an app) fails to restore even once, should not be used at all. 99% of reliability is not good enough...

    Edit: Another great free imaging app is RedoBackup not so advanced features as terabyte's or clonezilla's but is easy and it gets the job done plus you can navigate the net during the backups/restores.:)

    Panagiotis
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  10. sukarof

    sukarof Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Posts:
    1,714
    Location:
    Stockholm Sweden
    I have used Terabyte hundred of times through the years, it has never failed me. I have tested most of the imaging software out there and only 3 products have met my expectation of zero failed restores after 50+ restores: Terabyte Image for Dos/Windows, Shadowprotect and Macrium Reflect.
     
  11. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    Posts:
    8,516
  12. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Posts:
    1,785
    Location:
    US
    okay thank you guys.
     
  13. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Posts:
    1,785
    Location:
    US
    Update:
    Okay I looked over the several solutions that everyone proposed in here.
    1. Terabyte
      --> Paid software $29.99 not worth it, maybe if it was for 5 computers and for all operating systems with 2 years free upgrades then I would have considered it. I need a solution that I can use on as many computers as I can and not all of my friends/family use Linux.
    2. Redoback up
      --> No reliable option to create a bootable USBo_O I feel they are kind of behind in times. My last computer that had a CD/DVD RW was 5 years ago. Their only not recommanded option to use unetbootin didn't work.
      --> From their website looks like it might be much easier to use than Clonezilla but Im not gonna buy a CDRW just to use their program. More importantly I am not gonna be carrying around me a huge live CD.
    3. Crashplan
      --> No easy option to back up and restore entire hard drive from a bootable USB. The only clear options were their online servers (paid), friends computer and a folder. Maybe their UI was a little bit too confusing.
      --> No easy installation/uninstallation on Linux.
    4. Clonezilla
      --> Confusing UI but website offers step by step directions that are very easy to follow.
      --> Free to use on as many computers as I like
      --> Lots of advanced options
      --> Can be run from a USB disk without need to install it on a target computer

    So the winner for me is Clonezilla. Maybe if I needed incremental back ups then Terabyte or Crashplan would have been a better choice but this is not what I need. What I needed was a solution to back up a fully configured Netrunner image which I can restore with one click when something goes wrong. Clonezilla does it quite well. Although I wished that redoback up worked. On the other hand I might as well learn how to use Clonezilla which can come useful to do those nasty large Hard drive image clone transfers to smaller SSDs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  14. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Posts:
    2,566
    Actually is the only product that worths it.
    It is not for 5 computers, but it is valid for 3 (for home users) and the updates are free for the same major version.
    I bought a license on December 2008 and I still receive free updates.

    And is the only company that I know that treats the same a home user with 1 license and a company with 100 licenses.
    The support replies the same day.
    They fixed a bug that I submitted to them and released a new version after 1 day.
    I had the need to use Disk IDs for restores and they added the feature with their following update.
    I asked them to modify something in the Image for Dos guide version and they delivered it after a month.

    I purchased "BootIt Next Generation" on March 2010. they released it's upgrade "BootIT Bare Metal" on April 2011 and they gave me an upgrade for free even though it was released 13 months later.

    BottomLine Terabyte products are the best value for money.

    Panagiotis
     
  15. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Posts:
    1,517
    Completely agree with Panagiotis for his comments above.

    Terabyte is the only imaging software that I paid for. I bought IFL in Feb 2008 and I am still getting free update as they have not changed the major version number yet (v2) since then. 30 bucks last me 6 years and still going. I don't think any company is so generous to its customers.

    I did not notice IFL has a usage restriction in terms of the number of computers for home user? I used the IFL boot USB on all 4 of my computers without any problem. I was not aware they posed such kind of restrictions for home use.

    Terabyte worth every penny you pay for it. You won't regret buying it. BTW, IFL and Clonezilla are the top 2 apps for imaging a Linux box and you should use both to make images so that you have a backup image, although neither failed me before.
     
  16. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    IFL version 2 was released in December 2007. 92 free updates have been released. A purchase of IFL also includes a license for IFD and TBOSDT. IFL can also be used to image Windows OS.

    From page 174 in the IFL userguide...

     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  17. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    From the Clonezilla home page...

     
  18. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Posts:
    1,517
    Thanks Brian for the info. However it's confusing"can be installed" on 2 additional computers - as we all know that IFL does not require a installation to work - you simply make a boot USB stick and use it as a boot device to perform backup/restore.
    Does it really mean that I can not use the USB boot stick on more than 3 of my own computers?


     
  19. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    oliverjia,

    Don't ask me to explain this in legal terms but just using a boot disk once counts as an install.

    The following is from a Symantec employee regarding Ghost 2003. There are a few sentences that are of interest but most info is irrelevant to IFL.

     
  20. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Posts:
    1,517
    thanks for the info.

     
  21. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Posts:
    1,984
    Location:
    Canada
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.