Where do chinese sites get all those NOD32 usernames from?

Discussion in 'ESET NOD32 Antivirus' started by pinkish, Nov 17, 2010.

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  1. pinkish

    pinkish Registered Member

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    This has been puzzling me for years and I thought I'd ask around.

    There are lots of chinese sites (goodm***.cn especially), that have 20-30 fresh passwords everyday.

    NOD32 blocks browser access to that site, but how come they can't stop the "leak"? How do those passwords end up there?

    It's been a mystery for me for a long time now, I hope someone can shed a light on it!

    Thanx ;)
     
  2. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

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    You mean cracked passwords?
     
  3. pinkish

    pinkish Registered Member

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    They work, they're stolen from somewhere.

    They are in ESET's database and work.
     
  4. c2d

    c2d Registered Member

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    That's the question that has always interested me...
    The eternal struggle between good and evil.
    I would also like to know the answer to this.
     
  5. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    Well I certainly don't know BUT your posts reminded me to add the users id and the psw to my id block list in my firewall product. Not perfect but better than doing nothing.


    BTW where is the data to support the claim that this is happening? I'm not saying you guys are wrong but anybody can post anything here on a public forum.
     
  6. pinkish

    pinkish Registered Member

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    Your post makes no sense. What do you mean?
     
  7. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

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    Generated, stolen keys. There's loads of these sites around and you would have to turn off nod before going to the links as they are blocked by eset usually. The trouble with this sort of thing is the keys get blacklisted very quickly or used by someone else and the perpetrator will have to then go off looking for new keys sometimes every few days to every couple weeks.

    It would be much better to...but that's a different story.

    At the end of the day it still boils down to theft.
     
  8. Marcos

    Marcos Eset Staff Account

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    If a particular license is disclosed, there are mechanisms for distributors to learn about that and act accordingly. Having said that, we'll bring this thread to a close.
     
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