When installing any program...

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 2 Forum' started by kuba, Dec 24, 2005.

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  1. kuba

    kuba Registered Member

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    ...should you turn off NOD?
    eTrust had a "pause" feature, and I used it when installing programs in case the AV would block any exe/cab/dll files...is this the case with Nod?
    Or just install as usual and not worry about it?
    :cool::cool::cool:
     
  2. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    I've never experienced a problem letting NOD run while installing programs.
     
  3. BJStone

    BJStone Registered Member

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    I have never encountered any problems with NOD running along during installing software.
     
  4. alglove

    alglove Registered Member

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    99% of the time, I just leave NOD32 on while installing programs and don't worry about it.

    For the other 1%...

    In general, the reason you are sometimes told to disable antivirus software is because it may take too long to scan some of the installation files, making the installation program think they are corrupt (when they are really not... they are just busy).

    The only time I have ever noticed anything with NOD32 was some obscure file from Office Update. For some reason, NOD32 took a particularly long time to scan the file, so it seemed that the installation had frozen. However, if I waited long enough, it eventually went through.

    There are a couple of other cases in which I want to install something NOD32 classified as adware, but it was something I really wanted anyway. The old Weatherbug installation program fell into this category (I am not sure about the current version). Oddly enough, the Weatherbug program itself is not considered adware, just the installer. In such cases, you can always temporarily disable AMON (realtime file scanner) and IMON (internet scanner), install the program, and then turn them back on.

    These are definitely exceptions, however, and not the rule. I always leave NOD32 on.

    NOD32 also gives you the ability to exclude certain files or folders from AMON scanning, or certain servers from IMON scanning. You can do this while continuing to scan everything else. It gives you a lot more control than a complete On/Off" switch.
     
  5. Carver

    Carver Guest

    I've never had any problem at all with installing programs with NOD on. On the rare occasion a program will ask you to disable a resident like Ewido or spybot S&D. Never AV, and if they ask you to disable the firewall,it is because it might interfere with downloading. Say you have the firewall set to deny all .exes and the program you want to download is a .exe, rather than reconfigure the firewall you disable it for 30 seconds or how ever long it takes to download it. Then enable the firewall and Scan the download with your AV then scan it for spyware and what ever else you have before you install the program.
     
  6. pykko

    pykko Registered Member

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    It is recommended to let AMON turned on during the installation of any program if u're not sure it's absolutely clean. Some may contain malwares that on-demand scanner haven't picked due to the packers. ;)
     
  7. Brian N

    Brian N Registered Member

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    I used to disable my AV when installing software, but with NOD I really don't have to.
    It's super fast, so it really doesn't bother me if it's on or off :)
     
  8. RejZoR

    RejZoR Registered Member

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    Disabling AV when installing programs is ULTRA dumb. I wonder who even started doing that. Except maybe a bit longer install time (only few seconds total) there isn't any other compatibility problems. AV might trigger alert if you're messing up with boot records, but most of such programs do it in offline mode (before windows is loaded) so no problems here.
    Installers can be biggest risk of "importing" some attached garbage like toolbars and other ad-ware junk. Also most of AVs don't scan inside installers in real-time. So scanning them at install time is a smart thing to do.
     
  9. Brian N

    Brian N Registered Member

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    Not really that dumb. Some AV's will automatically delete files that it cannot clean, so if your AV detects an F/P during install .. Well you have to start all over again, or some reg keys will be screwed or other stuff. This is, of course, only something you do with trusted software!

    Not everyone has the luxury of choosing what to do with an infected file ;)
    At least I didn't with that stupid Panda Titanium which deleted 300+ of my .rar files. Years of work wasted right there.
     
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