What's the advantages/disadvantages of JonDo compared to Tor?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by DesuMaiden, Apr 13, 2013.

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  1. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    Pros (of JonDo over Tor)

    + More centralized (not everyone can become a node in JonDo. Therefore you don't have to worry about malicious nodes controlled by a three letter agency trying to conduct correlation-timing attacks. This makes JonDo safer to use than Tor).

    Cons (of JonDo compared to Tor)

    - Tor is slow but JonDo is even slower (often times 50kbs or slower connections whereas Tor is usually around 100kbs).

    -Since the node selection is less random than Tor, JonDo's logs are easier to collect. Plus the nodes are all controlled by a centralized entity so if a three-letter agency wanted to collect logs of your activities, it would be much easier.

    Overall I think JonDo is a better choice for everyday anonymous browsing. Mainly because you cannot trust everyone running the Tor nodes. What if enough Tor nodes were controlled by three-letter agencies that they can easily use correlation-timing attacks to de-anonymousize everyone using Tor? Tor's anonymity is based completely on random people around the world running nodes rather than a single entity.
     
  2. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    I'll take random people instead of a single entity any day!
     
  3. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    Of course, but if you've used Tor for long enough, chances are you hopped onto police controlled nodes, and they probably know what you were doing.
     
  4. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    I've run into attempted LEA/3 letter connections many times on TOR. PeerBlock alerts and blocks them when it sees them, but there's almost no way to know for certain you're not hooked into them. I've always said it, but if they or anyone else wants you bad enough, be it time or funds they are going to get to you.
     
  5. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    This is highly likely, but why would I care? They know what I did, not who I am :) (TOR offers anonymity, not privacy!)
     
  6. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    How does peerblock alert and block these bad nodes?
     
  7. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    Every time an IP address attempts to connect to you, Peerblock checks the lists it is given (lists you download and tell it to check). If an IP is listed on any of these "bad IP" lists, it doesn't allow that connection to your system. That doesn't mean you're safe. IP blocklists are only as good as the people who add to them and only blocks known IP addresses. No one can say that the NSA/ Copyright police IP address known to be used today is the same one they'll use tomorrow. If they don't, and the list makers haven't found the new one, well, you see the problem there.
     
  8. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

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    Anyone worth their salt in words can tell your peer block is pointless and not even worth the time, and actually breaks connectivity for almost no benefit. There is no reason to use it.
     
  9. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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    Do you even know what Tor is?

    First of all, IT sectors of police departments are notoriously inept. Like this guy here ...dubbed as an "Internet Crime Expert", who needed the local news crew to teach him about EXIF data in photos. Generally these guys know next to nothing. And why would they? They're not computer guys. They're freaking cops. Any real computer guy who wanted to go into LE work would either be at an ABC-agency or consulting for them. And it's not as if these departments can really train these guys, because of my second point...

    They don't have they money. Police departments don't have the budgets to be monitoring random Internet traffic...let alone setting up Tor nodes and providing bandwidth for the Tor community on the off chance they might catch some nefarious behavior. And even if they did have that kind of money, technology, and manpower to waste, you run into the third brick wall...

    The whole point of Tor is to anonymize the user. The entire point of the design is to prevent any link in the chain from knowing the true source of the traffic. I mean seriously, this is basic stuff. It's literally the entire point of Tor.

    How anyone could go around claiming that police departments would set up Tor nodes (which most literally can't), but even if they could, that they would sit there and monitor traffic and be able to trace it back to someone...it's just insane.


    Nonsense. I've used it for years with maybe two single instances of a connectivity issue (i.e. possibly two specific sites that were blocked that I legitimately needed access to. I can only think of one offhand, but there was possibly a second.)

    And if you need to access an IP that's blocked...um...just click the button that says "disable". Like magic, the blocked IP will connect! Imagine that.

    Seriously it takes up almost no resources, it doesn't hinder connectivity at all, and you prevent connections from over a Billion IPs that you don't need connecting to you. There's basically no reason not to use it.

    (And if there's a particular IP or range you need on a constant basis...you could easily add it to the whitelist.) I have no idea what your problem is.
     
  10. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    It's a bit harshly phrased, but I agree with Jackman.
     
  11. EncryptedBytes

    EncryptedBytes Registered Member

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    While I can't speak for law enforcement efforts, there are many individuals supporting various entities that are very well informed about the current virtual landscape. Tor .onion and i2p eepsites, etc. are just as familiar to them as they are to "crafty internet groups" ;)
     
  12. Jay215

    Jay215 Registered Member

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    am i the only one whos tor seems broken lately? flash videos like youtube videos dont seem to be blocked anymore and my real ip seems to be leaking on webpages

    also it doesnt support html5(i think thats the name of it)so webpages that have switched to that it doesnt seem to work with either
     
  13. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    This reinforces my confidence in Tor. Tor is in theory traceable, but in practice it is completely untraceable. Your real ip address is nearly impossible to trace. As long as a Tor user doesn't reveal any personal info, then there is no way he can be identified.
     
  14. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

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    I would say the only way that it could work is if law enforcement from different countries teamed together and controlled 50%+ of the TOR nodes secretly.
     
  15. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    Don't give them hints. Jesus don't tell them how to control Tor
     
  16. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

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    lol, even if they did this you can just add a proxy on the end of that and you have your protection again. Unless of course the same thing happens and they team together to control 50%+ of the worlds proxy servers.
     
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