What's different about tib files?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Earthling, Jun 10, 2009.

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  1. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    I ask because when I looked at defragging the eSATA where I keep loads of tib files and not much else, the files are all marked (by Auslogic) as Allocated Space, rather than Fragmented or Defragmented as it does for 'normal' files.

    I think this signifies that the files cannot be moved, not on the same partition anyway. Makes me wonder what happens if you move these files to another hard drive, as I did this once and lost all of them - when I tried a restore they were all corrupt, though this wasn't necessarily ATI's fault of course.

    The answer to this may be important, as I have seen advice on here in the past that you can move these archive files around if you want to.

    (Please don't ask why I would want to defrag a drive that only has backups on it, because actually I don't. I was just looking at the drive's defrag state)
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2009
  2. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    *.tib files are just normal files and they can be copied, renamed, have thier attributes set, etc. jsut like any other file. However, as of the somewhat dubitable version ATI12/2009, such changes need to be made within ATI simply so that ATI will correctly update its internal database of backup files. Prior versions didn't have an internal database so this wasn't an issue.


    If some program is treating the files oddly, perhaps you should check the file association seeting on your pc, it might be tagging tib files as something weirder than they are. I don't htin ATI tags them as sys files.

    Also, the file defragger might be preset by its manufacturer to exclude tib files because they take so long to move around and defraggin them provides so little value to the user.
     
  3. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Is there a chance there is not enough contiguous free space on your drive to deal with large .tib files?
     
  4. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    I really don't know the answer to that but it is a possibility. 117GB free, 202GB used, but Auslogic's defrag map does show large areas of 'allocated space' all over the partition. And lately this drive, which has always been quiet in the past, shows huge activity during bootup and actually gets quite hot. I think I need to know more about what the heck is going on during all this furious activity, but wouldn't know how to get at it.

    CHKDSK says it's OK anyway.

    Does Vista's built-in defrag just defrag the active partition, or does it try to keep all partitions defragged?
     
  5. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Another reason to use only the Rescue CD for both Backup and Recovery perhaps?
     
  6. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Not essential. Just do your own thing and use the Browse button to find the archives.
     
  7. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    If a drive is getting much hotter than it normally does when doing lots of writes, this can be an indication that that the motor bearings are going bad or a circuit board is faulty and disk failure is the impending result. I'd try to keep plenty of backups of the drive in question if you can't afford the data loss of a sudden failure. BTW, this isn't something that chkdsk would pick up since it's a physcal problem and not a logical fault. Chkdsk won't pick up anything unless the hardware prob starts causing incorrect writes; the the drive is likely to lose speed and freeze up before it starts commiting logical faults. You can try using something like Lavalys's Everest or some other program to monitor actual drive temps; sometimes that will help.


    This happened to me just recently. Thank goodness for multiyear hdrive warranties.

     
  8. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    These Medion PCs have a well in the top of the case designed to accept their HDD2GO with an eSATA connection. Very convenient, but if used constantly, because it's in a well, the drive gets much hotter than the identical internal SATA. I actually keep a saucepan of water on top of mine, because without it I've seen it as high as 70C. :argh:

    So the temp isn't unusually high, but the level of activity during startup definitely is, and has changed recently. This has happened since I made it 'home' for my tibs, but looking at Task Manager Services when it's going all frenzied, only DCOM and Plug and Play seem to be using any significant cpu, so I'm a bit mystified as to what's going on.

    Suspect Acronis is behind it somewhere though.
     
  9. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Earthling:

    Have you turned off Indexing and System Restore on the drive that you store .tib files on?
     
  10. allanc

    allanc Registered Member

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    Are you saying that the batch files will not update the internal database?
    If so, how does one rename the .tib?
    I would like to rename instead of consolidate.
    TIA.
     
  11. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    You've sorted yet another issue for me. Thanks Mark :)

    (Indexing service :rolleyes: )
     
  12. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    I imagine that if Windows was trying to index the contents of all of your .tib files, the result would be a very huge index!
     
  13. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    Turning indexing off on this drive has also had the effect of allowing Auslogics to show the disk's defrag state correctly - as Fragmented and Defragmented files rather than Allocated Space.

    I've never given much consideration to the indexing service before, but having seen what overload it can cause hopefully I shall in future.
     
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