what kind of a hash is this?

Discussion in 'Other Ghost Security Software' started by lone_hacker, May 9, 2004.

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  1. lone_hacker

    lone_hacker Registered Member

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    i got this from a mysql db,
    And I was wondering what this could be,
    Its not an MD5 hash right,
    can anyone tell me what the heck this is,
    and with which i can reverse the encryption,

    7a3310dc39c1d3df
     
  2. Jason_R0

    Jason_R0 Developer

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    It is a 64bit hash (which one I cannot tell without more information). With hashes you cannot really "reverse the encryption" or "decrypt" it, this is because most hashes are 1 way only, and also due to the fact that the data you are hashing is usually much greater than the size of the hash.
     
  3. lone_hacker

    lone_hacker Registered Member

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    actually this is how it looks like,

    from mysql db > user (table) > password,

    +-----------+--------------+------------------+
    | Host | User |Password |
    +-----------+--------------+------------------+
    | localhost | root | 7a3310dc39c1d3df |

    here is a MD5 hash,
    5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99
    its decrypted value is password

    hashes can be cracked bruteforcely, i beleive, with JTR or sumthing
     
  4. Jason_R0

    Jason_R0 Developer

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    Hashes can be bruteforced, but you can't find the original data the hash was taken from. All you can do is find another piece of data which when hashed equals the hash you are after. Most software take a password and generate a MD5 hash from it, the password isn't stored anywhere except as the MD5 hash. To verify that a password is correct the software takes the password given by the user, generates a MD5 hash from it and checks it against the MD5's in the database. If they match then they have successfully entered the password.

    Of course there is plenty of other passwords the user can enter which will give the same MD5, but finding one is the difficulty of breaking secure hashes. :)
     
  5. FanJ

    FanJ Guest

    LOL, going to the heart of crypto-analysis...
    Where is Bruce Schneier? ;)
    (or WriterRanger, or Luv2bsecure...).

    Time for some mathematical theory about inverse function? :D
     
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