What is your Registry Defrag/Compact/Compress tool of choice?

Discussion in 'polls' started by guest, Jul 8, 2011.

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What is your Registry Defrag/Compact/Compress tool of choice?

  1. Eusing Free Registry Defrag

    4.2%
  2. Auslogics Registry Defrag

    11.5%
  3. Quicksys RegDefrag

    1.0%
  4. WinASO RegDefrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. PageDefrag

    5.2%
  6. WinMend Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Simnet Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Elcor Registry Defragmentation

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. Ainvo Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. WinUtilities Free Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  11. AceLogiX Registry Compactor

    1.0%
  12. Digeus Registry Defragmenter

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  13. Rose City Registry Compressor

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  14. Little Registry Optimizer

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  15. iExpert Free Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  16. Ainvo Registry Defrag

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  17. Other specific Registry Defrag/Compact/Compress tool

    13.5%
  18. Other tool bundled with different features

    10.4%
  19. None

    53.1%
  1. guest

    guest Guest

    I'm using Eusing Free Registry Defrag.

    EDIT: the gains probably aren't bigger than disabling windows time service (in terms of RAM saved), but I just like to maintain the system as tidy as possible.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 8, 2011
  2. ExtremeGamerBR

    ExtremeGamerBR Registered Member

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  3. acuariano

    acuariano Registered Member

    Joined:
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    Posts:
    786
    pagedefrag
     
  4. moontan

    moontan Registered Member

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    Québec
    none of them.
     
  5. ichito

    ichito Registered Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Poland - Cracow
    I voted "Other specific Registry Defrag..." - I use ERUNT Gui and PageDefrag...and BTW I don't see e.g. Vit Registry Fix, Glary, Argente...
     
  6. Fad

    Fad Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Posts:
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    Location:
    England
    None, but if I did it would probably be JV16 since I already use that occasionally as a cleaner.
     
  7. TairikuOkami

    TairikuOkami Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Posts:
    2,508
    Location:
    Slovakia
    Quicksys RegDefrag, by the way most people defragments HDD, but forget about registry.
     
  8. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    USA
    The performance increase is noticed more in the HD than in the registry and how much can you compact on average...8% maybe.
     
  9. TairikuOkami

    TairikuOkami Registered Member

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    Location:
    Slovakia
    Ussualy ~50%. A month ago it decreased registry size from 100MB to 40MB and I do it about 1-2 times per month. I am not an expert, but I suppose, that if registry entries have ~20MB size, registry can have like 200MB, because free space will not to be reused, if there is not enough clusters for other entries, so it is not like HDD where 20MB is allways 20MB, just fragmented. I guess, that is why Linux has no registry, txt forever. P.S.: LastDefrag=7/3/2011 18:44:08 - SizeRecovered=28,820 KB (30%)
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  10. majoMo

    majoMo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2007
    Posts:
    938
    NTRegOpt by Lars Hederer. Using it and ERUNT to backup hive registry files. Both with command line switches that allows perform an
    automated registry backup/registry optimize, without user interaction.
     
  11. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    Feb 5, 2006
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    1,827
    Location:
    USA
    Registry care looks like a 2 step process 1.Cleaner 2. Def rag
     
  12. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Posts:
    9,148
    Registry defragmentation has never been shown to increase any performance. However, messing with your registry can completely destroy your OS.

    Therefor, none.
     
  13. guest

    guest Guest

    Auslogics guys explain this better:

    So this is not a performance myth, neither a dangerous registry edit.

    Stop confusing things, people.
     
  14. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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  15. guest

    guest Guest

    There is nothing in that article about defragging/compacting/compressing registry.

    Try to read the articles you link people to, before posting them.
     
  16. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    Auslogics point was that you safe space when you defrag your registry -- you reduce the size.

    Removing registry values will reduce the size as well.

    IE: Reducing the size has no performance benefits.

    And if something went wrong during the defrag your registry could end up corrupted.

    edit: I could be wrong. I've long heard it was a myth. I'm not inclined to believe Auslogics' own review of their product.
     
  17. guest

    guest Guest

    Sigh. But the article you linked (which is good btw) didn't tell you this lie. :)

    You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Your logic is flawed as the free space isn't recovered after programs are installed, used and removed - the data will be marked as blank but remains in place, which makes the registry more and more fragmented over time.

    FYI, registry defragging is recommended by Mark Russinovich, Technical Fellow in the Platform and Services Division at Microsoft, and author of the PageDefrag tool, that does just that (among with defragging the paging file).

    ~Off topic comments removed. Discuss the software disagreements in a rational manner please.~
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 8, 2011
  18. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    Ok, if you copy a file to a clean hard drive, it gets stored as close to the beginning as it can get. Normally, this causes files to happily line up. Sometimes though, when you delete a file, then copy a new file over, the new file is bigger than the free space from the old one. So it lays a chunk into the free space, then the rest in the next free space. This is fragmentation, and can cause slowdown as the hard drive has to spin about to locate the entire file.

    The Registry is composed of 5 files. These files are in "reserved space" and cannot normally fragment, since they don't change size dramatically so they tend to sit in their happy place with no issues.

    The Registry itself cannot fragment because the stuff inside has a certain place it has to live. It can't be chopped up and stuck in different locations in the registry because that would be stupid and serve no purpose. However, it can get junk like lines that no longer function or point to anything, and those bog it down since it still has to read those lines to do stuff. CCleaner gets rid of most of those lines, though, like any other automated process, does have a small chance of messing things up by deleting things it shouldn't.

    But that's life.
     
  19. guest

    guest Guest

    Again, you are confusing things.

    We aren't talking about physical defragmentation of registry files (which really isn't necessary). We are talking about simply compacting the registry hives to the minimum size possible (which came to be known as registry defragmentation)!

    This procedure removes any slack space, reducing the registry size and ultimately the amount of RAM the registry takes up, improving the computer performance.

    That can be done and should be done, according to Microsoft: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897426
     
  20. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Posts:
    9,148
    1) Runs on:

    Client: Windows XP (32-bit)
    Server: Windows Server 2003 (32-bit)

    2)
    Published: November 1, 2006
     
  21. guest

    guest Guest

    Well, Win XP is what I'm using, so I'm talking from a XP perspective.
     
  22. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
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    9,148
    "PageDefrag does not defragment the contents of the registry files, only the placement of these files on the hard drive. "

    from the wikipage on it

    SO, basically, you MIGHT save yourself maaaaaaaybe 1MB of RAM from defragging the registry. Maybe.
     
  23. guest

    guest Guest

    PageDefrag is a limited tool, that's why people use NTREGOPT and/or others to achieve a better result. I use Eusing Free Registry Defrag and it does an excellent job.
     
  24. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Posts:
    9,148
    Regardless of the tool you can reduce the space of the registry all you like and you'll only ever end up with about 1MB of extra RAM if you're lucky.

    I personally would not bother installing an entire program to save 1MB of RAM.

    edit: I ran the registry defrag from auslogics. It saved me approximately 4,200Kb of space in my registry....
     
  25. jadinolf

    jadinolf Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Posts:
    463
    Location:
    Ojai, CA
    Fix-It Utilities 4.0 but never use it.
     
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