What is the plural of the word 'virus'

Discussion in 'malware problems & news' started by Fernando Villegas, Mar 1, 2006.

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  1. Fernando Villegas

    Fernando Villegas Registered Member

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    What is the plural of the word virus? Please vote.
     
  2. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    viruses
     
  3. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    here you go
     

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  4. Fernando Villegas

    Fernando Villegas Registered Member

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    Thank you. Please vote. I'm sick and tired of people in this forum who should really know better say virii!

    Please also see

    http://spl.haxial.net/viruses.html

    Please read the rest of the page too, very informative.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_virus#Use_of_the_word_.22virus.22

    Hey "Bigc", I'm confused you voted for virii or virio_O Did you google up the correct answer after answering the poll??
     
  5. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    I hate getting and cleaning virii :D ;) :p
     
  6. TonyW

    TonyW Registered Member

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  7. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    As a foreigner, I always write viruses.
    I always thought that viri was a slang word, like warez, but I don't know much about slanguages.
    It's already hard enough for me to write and spell in English. :)
     
  8. crash79`

    crash79` Registered Member

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    It is a long time since I was at school but I think we were always told that if the word ended with a 's' like virus the plural would be spelt virus'.
     
  9. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I think you are confusing this with something else.

    Prediction of God = God's prediction
    Prediction of Jesus = Jesus' prediction (because the name ends with a "s" and Jesus's prediction is wrong.

    I could be wrong of course. :D
     
  10. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    It's how you pronounce the word ErikAlbert, so it would be Jesus's (Ge-zhus-es) prediction, but not the dolls' (dallz) prediction :)

    Alphalutra1
     
  11. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    ~snip~ man, you make it even more difficult for me.
    Now I have to know how to pronounce the words in order to spell it right.
    I'm better in writing, than speaking English. LOOOOOOOOL
    Nevertheless, I was closer to the truth, than crash79. That's a comfort. :)
    Thanks Alphalutra.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 1, 2006
  12. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    that only applies if something belongs to the virri :D and you can't tell if it's singular or plural because both are spelt the same. it doesn't apply here because virus and viruses have different spellings and nothing belongs to the virus.

    i admit i was rubbish at English at skool :D but i went to a good skcool so my friend's brains rubbed off on me :blink:

    i don't think objects can own things anyway.
     
  13. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    Anything but viruses would be wrong.
     
  14. Rmus

    Rmus Exploit Analyst

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    This refers to the spelling of the possessive, not the plural.

    Examples:

    "Sasser and Sober are sometimes called viruses." (plural of virus)

    "Speaking of Sasser, this virus' characteristics include ....." (possessive of virus)

    ---
     
  15. crash79`

    crash79` Registered Member

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    At least I got half of it right.
    Thanks for that.
     
  16. Franklin

    Franklin Registered Member

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    Plurals of words whose endings sound like "us"

    Any word whose singular ends with a *sound* like "us" or similar,
    pluralises to "ii". However, for historical reasons, alternative
    spellings more commonly used by English scholars (e.g. "viruses",
    "buses") are allowed as well. For example:

    Singular Correct Plural Alternative Plural
    ------------------------------------------------------
    bus bii buses
    cactus cactii -
    canvas canvii canvases
    fetus fetii fetuses
    fuss fii fusses
    mattress mattrii mattresses
    octopus octopii octopuses
    penis penii penises
    radius radii -
    rhinoceros rhinocerii rhinoceroses
    status statii statuses
    thesaurus thesaurii thesauri, thesauruses
    virus virii viruses

    Anyone know any others?
     
  17. Meltdown

    Meltdown Registered Member

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    I'd opt for virus's as the possessive. Here's my main man for punctuation on the possessive for nouns ending in s:
    source
     
  18. Meltdown

    Meltdown Registered Member

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    The same man (this is from a book I have):
    Some of the other examples in your list I'm not sure about, but bus, canvas, fuss and mattress definitely shouldn't be there. And rhinoceros is Greek, not Latin, so the plural is rhinoceroses.
     
  19. trickyricky

    trickyricky Registered Member

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    Don't forget the hippopotamus. And all his family, the hippopotamuses. Or hippopotami, depending on where you live and what day of the week it is.
     
  20. Franklin

    Franklin Registered Member

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    Well to be honest.I'm not sure about any of them.o_O

    Just thought I would post them for a bit of a stir.

    If anyone uses "virii" or "viruses" it doesn't worry me,I know what they mean.:)
     
  21. snowbound

    snowbound Retired Moderator

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    lol,

    I have often wondered when i see the term "malwares" being used. Just doesn't look or sound right. Seems just using "malware" will cover most uses but i'm no english major so what do i know. ;) :D


    snowbound
     
  22. Franklin

    Franklin Registered Member

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    Google search stats-

    "Computer malware" = 51,800
    "Malware" = 41,800,000

    "Computer malwares" = 205
    "Malwares" = 848,000

    "Computer virii" = 9,720
    "Virii" = 925,000

    "Computer viruses" = 8,940,000
    "Viruses" = 267,000,000

    So it seems "viruses" and "malware" rule!;)
     
  23. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    A bit off-topic, but I don't want to waste a thread on this.
    I don't know how to spell the past time of the verb "read" and I use that verb alot.

    Present time : I read a book
    Past time : ?
     
  24. Meltdown

    Meltdown Registered Member

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    Read. Yesterday I read a book. Pronounced 'red'.

    Your example with the present tense is not something native English speakers would say. We'd use the present continuous: I'm reading a book, meaning an activity I'm doing right now, or over a broader stretch of time (I'm reading War and Peace). The simple present is used for habitual actions: I read The Economist every week. I read a lot of science fiction.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2006
  25. Meltdown

    Meltdown Registered Member

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    Back on topic: I think it would be more fun if we all made up our own plurals. Here's what I'm going to use:

    one virus - two virosi
    one trojan - two trojenes
    one worm - two worm (like sheep)​

    Any kind of -ware I'm going to treat as a countable noun: a software, a malware. Plurals are softsware, malsware, adsware, but - careful! - the plural of spyware is spiesware.

    Finally, all technical terminology will be rendered in improvised French, and invariably italicised.


    Example:

    Today my regular AV scan reported two trojenes and five worm. I'm surprised by these results, as my log du firewall shows no suspicious activity. Are these genuine malsware, or just positifs falses?

    To which the correct response would be:

    Have you tried uploading them to le scan du virus de Monsieur Jotti?
     
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