VPN more SAFE?

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Rico, Aug 26, 2020.

  1. Rico

    Rico Registered Member

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    Security freaks, more is better!

    Bitdefender partners Netgear - $$$$
    Firefox partners with Mullvad - $$$$
    etc.
    How much/many malware attacks does VPN prevent. 'does AV comparatives test, vpn/no vpn for SAFE?
    Shouldn't AV's etc inherently protect, & not ask for more $$$$ for protection, like BDo_O?

    For me it comes down to:

    I pay for protection (promises all), but for extra $$$$. we will make you more safe, or (honor original)
    Ask how many iDevices have been infected, from lack of vpn.

    Prove me wrong, my humble apologies
     
  2. Osaban

    Osaban Registered Member

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    I thought VPN is first and foremost protecting your identity, I don't think it protects from malware...
     
  3. XIII

    XIII Registered Member

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    A VPN also protects against someone hijacking your unencrypted communication on an open WiFi network (like Firesheep once did).

    Since a VPN requires servers and data traffic, they have recurring costs. Thus, it makes sense to charge a price to customers.
     
  4. Rico

    Rico Registered Member

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    https://www.usa.gov/identity-theft

    "when you're on a public wi-fi network https://www.usa.gov/sites/all/themes/usa/images/Icon_Tooltip_sm02.png . Use a virtual private network (VPN) https://www.usa.gov/sites/all/themes/usa/images/Icon_Tooltip_sm02.png , if you use public wi-fi."

    At home use common sense & not give out personal info. VPN of value on public wifi!

    All companies have reoccurring expenses.

    Perhaps public wifi scare is overblown
    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/01/why-public-wi-fi-lot-safer-you-think

    https is not enough for public?

    So it seems, vpn on home, is a waste of money. Even with a false sense of security enabled vpn, you can still be tricked, and provide info to lose identity.
     
  5. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    I could not disagree more. What is important to understand is that a VPN is not a "baby sitter" that will constantly stop you from doing stupid things. How about a word picture - think of your VPN (if its free or not tested by experienced users it may be crap) like a copper water pipe in your home. The pipe has two ends, but if the pipe is good there will be NO leaks of water along the run of the pipe. i.e. no water leaks out and no water enters mid-pipe. That my friend is exactly what a GOOD trusted VPN is regarding internet connectivity. When you connect to website xyz the average user thinks there is some magic little wire that goes directly to the website server, but that is wayyyyyy wrong. The route to a webserver passes through numerous gateways and hackers along with 3 letter agencies gain elevated priv's on those gateways. If your "water pipe" continuing my example is solid nothing leaks in or out along the route. That is entirely the role for transiting traffic via VPN.

    Next you have to look at the two ends of that example pipe. One function of the VPN is to make sure the first end only allows YOUR ISP to detect that the other end of the pipe is connected to VPN server X. Anything done beyond that server X is completely off base to your ISP. They can only see the connection duration and bandwidth (which can be concealed with packing, but that is another thread). This means your data and what you do is Private, especially from your ISP. A good example would be where I live on TOR throughout the day and yet my ISP has no clue that I ever have used TOR, which draws bad attention at times.

    Now lets move to the other end of our example pipe. In workspace terms this is called the exit node. That means you are now leaving the pipe and therefore the VPN is no longer handling nor responsible for your activities. This is where inexperienced users make most of the mistakes, and for which VPN's get blamed in error. I could write thousands of words on how to conduct yourself post exit node, but in any regard this is NEVER in any fair sense of the argument because of a bad VPN.

    So for folks that really understand what a VPN can do I believe using one is a no brainer. My computers NEVER go online without a vpn. By firewall configuration, personally and uniquely written, I don't allow any option for non-VPN traffic.
     
  6. trott3r

    trott3r Registered Member

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    "https is not enough for public?"

    Tahat will be only web browsers all you mobile apps are communicating as well.


    "So it seems, vpn on home, is a waste of money. Even with a false sense of security enabled vpn, you can still be tricked, and provide info to lose identity."

    Your isp is probably selling on the websites you visit for profit as well as you government has access to what websites your visit along with your emails.
     
  7. Rico

    Rico Registered Member

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    Agree?

    From link usa.gov

    upload_2020-8-27_14-19-49.png
    Private network, updating FW, & extensions such as 'https everywhere' etc. Still vulnerable &
    still need protection of a VPN, to avoid identity theft.

    That's not what I've been reading, concerning home usage & vpn. Advantages home vpn. geo unlocking, not worth it, & congress passed a law, the allows ISP to sell data collected (supposed to be randomized) to 3rd parties, that would be blocked by vpn.

    Edit:
    I have 3 or 4 more days of free trial left, perhaps dumb questions but will help me decide, to keep or return!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2020
  8. arran

    arran Registered Member

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    I don't believe VPN providers filter virus.exe files being downloaded to your computer, But you have however raised another more important question which is does Mullvad's new partnership with Firefox make it more or less trustworthy with regards to not keeping user logs?
     
  9. Rico

    Rico Registered Member

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    For those on the road allot vpn makes sense. For the occasional traveler this seems reasonable:
    https://www.top10vpn.com/reviews/protonvpn-free/

    Home according to USA Gov. 'Private Network' VPN not required. Add a little more security, use 'https everywhere' or equivalent. Plus not giving personal info (phishing) defeats the necessity for paid vpn.
    I can understand the paranoid, an armed to the teeth mentality, most likely not cost effective, to risk. Geez! I can remember the mantra was "change/filter oil" every 2K miles on your car! Times have changed
    oil /filters/engines have gotten allot better. But some cling to the old!!

    **** evolves, memories, reality (now) slow to keep up!
     
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