VMware Player?

Discussion in 'sandboxing & virtualization' started by Rilla927, Jun 15, 2010.

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  1. Rilla927

    Rilla927 Registered Member

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    Is "prebuilt browser appliance" a add-on for VM player or is it the VM player with prebuilt browser appliance wrapped into one?
     
  2. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2010
  3. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

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    Version 3.0 and above includes creating your own virtual machines with installer discs and ISO images. Most free OS (linux, bsd, etc.) downloads use an .iso file.
     
  4. Rilla927

    Rilla927 Registered Member

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    Bear with me guys if I ask something so simple, it's because I haven't a clue. Now I understand what the browser appliance is because hierophant gave a link.

    Is the link for the browser appliance and VM player all in this one link or is the browser appliance a add-on you install after the VM Player is installed?

    J L

    Are you saying you can create a virtual machine from a image of your system?


    My goal is to get Mandriva 2010 Live CD to work and see how I like it and then install Mandriva as my host system and then run XP in VM Player so I can use my older games.
     
  5. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

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    Browser appliance is just an add-on that simplifies installing an operating system. You run it, and it works.. Need VMware Player installed (or another version).

    .iso is the image for burning into any optical media. That includes cd, dvd, blueray etc.
    Basically, they're a backup of what a cd is.
     
  6. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    VMware Player is software that you download and install, just like word processors or whatever. Although it's free, you do need to "register".

    Virtual machines (VMs) -- which VMware calls appliances -- are just sets of files that you run with VMware Player (or VirtualBox etc). For example, there's a virtual machine file (VMX) and a virtual disk file (VMDK).

    Operationally, running VMs is almost as simple as opening files with Word or whatever.

    You can create a VM from any OS installation disk, or an image file (ISO) of any such disk. Basically, you install the OS on the VM, in the same way that you'd install it to a real machine.
     
  7. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    oohh, so many questions..:)
    Difficult to answer in one go :D
    Download and install VMPlayer...( make images or use FDISR or whatever you like first jic for own peace of mind)

    The appliances as noted are run by the VMPlayer.

    The appliances are just a file ( move, copy, delete, edit: all the usual) but function as VMachines in VMPlayer:
    ie after install of VMPlayer, dl appliance and point the player > Appliance (virtual machine) of choice
    Seems so..a new feature :)
    Yes, but that can get a bit complex.
    Easy stuff first. :)
    Depending on your system, that may be a bit ambitious/excessive at this point
    (and the graphics functions of the VMs are not always up to scratch.)

    Running Virtual Machines in Linux is not quite so straight forward as running VMs in Windows. Easy stuff first :)

    If you want Mandriva -not a bad choice- and XP, U might be better off dual booting; search "dual boot linux xp"
    http://www.google.com/search?&q=dual boot linux xp :lots of cool and useable info *Image first*

    If you just want to have a test drive of linux on your HD, use wubi:
    http://www.wubi-installer.org/
    or Mint 4Win; lots of intro and user guides here:
    http://www.google.com/search?&q=mint 4 win

    To test run Mandriva in a VM, you might consider downloading - the FREE- Virtual Box:
    http://www.virtualbox.org/
    Create a new 'blank' VM; it's easy and intuitive for someone with your experience, point to a downloaded Mandriva CD.iso in the virtual CD Drive and boot the VM from the CD: all will be revealed. :thumb:

    If u have the spare $$, get VMWare Workstation, u wont regret it. :)
    (Virtual Box is a really good option.)

    U will feel right at home with VMWare or VB in no time at all

    I recall Mrk made some good tutorials:
    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computer_software.html#virtualization
    this is now slightly ood but still a good intro:
    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/vmware_player.html

    If you dl the appliance ( virtual machine) of choice ie
    http://www.vmware.com/appliances/directory/434563

    Then as above point VMPlayer at the Mandriva VM ( or whatever u choose) and away you go : fully virtualised, preconfiged ( installed) Mandriva OS ready to go.

    Dont like it? Fine: shuit down the VM, delete the VM/appliance and start over

    Good Desktop VMs here:
    http://vmplanet.net/taxonomy/term/2
    This guy offers free OS's well configed
    http://bagside.com/bagvapp/

    It's seems like a bit of overload at first ..options..options ..options..:)
    Seriously, not too challenging for basic desktop and VM experience.

    Despite usual precautions re protecting an image of your current HD, especially before attempting dual-boot, it's almost impossible to screw your current HD installed OS just by installing VMWare or VB and running VMs.

    You need some extra space for the Dls and VMs, and enough RAM to run both VM and native OS.
    (wubi and Mint4win just use native HW as per any other install but might chew RAM a bit)

    There are a couple of well versed users here who can help you out.
    HTH
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010
  8. Rilla927

    Rilla927 Registered Member

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    Thanks guys for your replies, now I understand much better.

    Longboard, I think your right about dual booting instead. One the fellas mention the graphics weren't up to snuff. I know this will take some time before everything comes together.

    I'm still trying to get the Mandriva One Live CD to work. Right now I'm using Fedora 13 Live CD. It's a decent distro. Thanks for the links I will have a good read.
     
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