Vista Ultimate image on DVD?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by bimbobo, Feb 4, 2008.

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  1. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    Hi,
    I read that a complete install of Vista Ultimate needs up to 12 GB or more... and this is also with SP1, when released...

    How can we make an image with TI then? Even a double layer DVD only have 8.5GB. I do not have an extra drive or other media storage.

    Does the complete install of Vista give some space back when finished? If not what is the workaround to have a Vista Ultimate image.

    Regards
     
  2. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    The best answer is "Buy an external hard drive!" However, if that is impossible, you will have to back up to DVDs.

    TrueImage will span DVDs to put the backup on two, three or more DVDs.

    Frankly, I consider it a painfully slow and unreliable way of doing backups and restoring is even slower an more painful, but if you don't have money for an external hard drive I suppose you are stuck.
     
  3. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    Some folks use DVD backup for long term arching. Howver, realize that each disk adds additonal risks for something to go wrong when you actually try to restore. And it's not just amatter of inserting DVD 1 then 2 then 3. . ., it's a lot of back and forth and reinsertions, so as the number of DVDs increases, the number of swaps during a restore grows exponentially. If your serious about backup, you should consider the cost of an additonal hard drive part of the cost of maintaining data integrity.
     
  4. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    I do think about buying a NAS later on.. right now I just need a Vista DVD to reinstall an image in emergency situations.

    Only Vista and SP1 when will there...

    Thanks
     
  5. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    You want the backup and Vista on one DVD? I think you'd have to have areally small image. If you just want Vsita on a CD so that you can intiate image restoration, you can do that with a VistaPE disk. But a disk image to be restored is unlikely, in most cases, to fit on a CD or DVD -- unless it comprises only a few data files.
     
  6. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    If I install Vista Ultimate and SP1 when available, which options do I have to backup the whole C and D partitions?

    If I use a NAS with both USB2 and ethernet.. what's the best way to reinstall the image? How do the ricovery CD can get the image fom NAS when "reformatting"?

    Guys.. I'm not an "expert"... I need it very easy!!! :)

    Regards
     
  7. Mac25

    Mac25 Registered Member

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    very easy would be another internal hard drive, dedicated for image backups.
     
  8. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    yes, but I still need to know how to restore the image... never mind where from, hard drive, NAS... how to do this from the Recovery Disk, when the main hard drive is empty.

    Thanks

    Regards
     
  9. truthseeker

    truthseeker Former Poster

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    Im running Vista Ultimate and it only takes up 9GB, and thats with all my added software etc. And when I use Acronis NORMAL compression to make an image, the file is only 5GB, and I burn it onto a dual layered (8.5) DVD.

    NO idea why someone say its 12GB, because that is not true. Maybe they should remove certain unneeded programs from Vista.

    And even if its more than 8.5GB, then you can create split images, so you can burn it to 2 DVD's.
     
  10. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    The Recovery disk has a feature named ... Recovery. So you boot with the Recovery disk and run the Recovery feature. It will restore your Backup Image to the hard drive. And, in fact, the drive must be empty to do so. If it isn't True Image will ask for you to confirm that the drive be deleted of any data on it, before it can procede with the restore.
     
  11. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    Thanks both..

    When restoring the PC is naked/empty, how can I tell the ricovery disk to get the image from.... DVD, NAS or other storage media.

    Can the DVD, NAS or else be seen by the ricovery procedure when there are no driver on the PC at the moment, how can Acronis recognize the different storage media?

    Regards

    Sorry again, someone will think I am a "sink" ;)
     
  12. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    The drivers are in the OS that boots from the TI CD. If you boot the Full Mode of TI, the drivers a Linux-based. If you boot the Safe Mode version of TI, the drivers are DOS-based. These are the drivers used to access your DVD, NAS, internal drives, etc.

    This is the same as booting a Knoppix CD or other Live-CD (like Ubuntu). The booting CD/DVD doesn't care what OS is or isn't installed on the computer or what drivers may or may not be installed in that OS. The OS on the CD will boot, load the drivers necessary for the computer and run the OS. It's all self-contained, which is why it isn't necessary to have anything installed on the computer to use it.
     
  13. bimbobo

    bimbobo Registered Member

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    Hi,
    I can only say thanks!

    In 2 weeks I have a new PC, so I will see if I can use all these suggestions, meaning.... if I understood them well. ;)

    Regards
     
  14. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Here's what I'd do. Make a TI 11 Recovery CD. When your new computer arrives, boot from the Recovery CD before you do anything else (or at least before you do much of anything else). After booting from the CD confirm that you can see the internal C drive and also the drive where you want to store backups.

    Make a full system image backup of the entire hard drive (all partitions if there are more than one) to your backup drive.

    Verify that backup!

    If you can successfully do all the above, TI 11 fully supports your new computer from the Linux environment of the Recovery CD, and you will be able to restore your system in the event of a problem - well, there's a 95+% chance that it will be successful. The only way to be 100% sure is to actually do a restore, but that isn't normally needed.
     
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