Vista clone on new disk boot with error 0x0000007B

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Patrice_bambou, Nov 9, 2008.

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  1. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi all,

    I have a big problem regarding Vista cloning on a new disk: the new diskl does not boot : I have the BSOD with 0x0000007B error ate the very first stage of Vista boot

    The procedure:
    I have a 320 Gbytes HD with Vista on primary partition and 4 other logical partitions.
    I wanted to change this on a new disk of 500 GB.

    So, for this I used the Acronis True Image cloning tool in automatic mode.
    (I used the 2009 version I just bought).

    So, Acronis performs all copies of the partitions from one disk to another, at boot time. When finished, I remove my old disk and put the new disk as primary disk (in fact I disconnect the SATA cable from the initlal disk and plugged the new disk SATA cable in the same connector as the initial drive, so this one becomed now the boot disk).

    At this time, windows either does not find the winload.exe program >> I use the Vista DVD to make a repair and after that, the 0.0000007B error comes, even after the repair.
    Or directly shows the 0x0000007B error.

    My copy of Vista is an EOM. I changed the processor, the memory, and added a new disk. I do not think this is related to this, as when I come back with my initial disk and keeping the new disk, all things return to normal and Vista boots without any problem

    Other thing, when I go back to the initial state with my intial disk as bootablez disk) (so in this state, the new disk and its content are seen as data), then sometimes all partitions are shown in this new disk and sometimes some are missing (for example, the primary partition is not shown for the moment) (for different tries of cloning, because, obviously, I tried several times with different scenarios for cloning).

    Might be this related to the content of the master boot record on the new disl (but this si also copied by Acronis...)

    So, for the moment I keep my initial disk, but still try to understand what is going wrong here).

    I checked the drivers of my new disk and they are up to date and also the serial ATA srivers of my motherboard (Asus P5W DH Deluxe).

    My new disk is new with no error. Processor and memory work well in initial state (old disk as boot:blink: , new disk as data). So, this is not a HW problem.

    Thanks for any help. I tried to find the root cause for 2 days full time now and did not find anything.

    WBR.

    Patrice.
     
  2. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    If you have tried everything else, why not try My guide to Manual Cloning using the TI Rescue CD

    My suggestion are
    1. Perform the clone when booted from the True Image Rescue CD.
    2. Do a reverse clone which means Move the original to another position either internal or external or network.
    3. Install the blank target in the same boot position as was the original.
    4. Perform the clone as per my guide.
    5. Disconnect the original before first bootup. You do not want Windows seeing both drives on first bootup followiing cloning.
     
  3. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Patrice:

    Additionally, you have had both the original drive and the clone attached when booting into Windows, so the registry of the original now contains drive letter assignments for the clone's partitions, which will get transferred to the clone, and Windows is likely to have already modified the clone to make it unbootable (Windows does not like having two identical drives attached, so it makes changes to one, apparently to the clone on your system since it boots OK with just the original attached).

    You should use TI 2009 to prepare the new drive (clone) by first wiping it clean. Then perform the clone when the target disk is blank. For best results, follow Grover's suggested procedure.
     
  4. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi all,

    I think the issue I have is related to the different posts about Vista problems and ATI.
    What is going wrong, I do not know exactly.
    But when seing threads like:
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=173214
    and also
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=171579

    I am sure my problem has to do with these issues.

    So, Cloning a Vista disk with several partitions does not seem working in any case for me.

    I have tried the method as described by GroverH and it does not work.

    Maybe have I to format my new disk at low level and also erase the MBR. Is there a risk to reset/erase the MBR of the new disk?

    What is exactly the issue with the sector 63 and 2048? What are the consequences for the system and boot process?

    Notice I have already restored my initial partition from a full backup archive and it worked. But this is not the problem here: here I want to clone my system from one disk to another.

    Do you have other advice?

    Thanks.

    Patrice.
     
  5. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    No, in fact you will have fewer problems if the target disk is completely blank (no existing partitions) when doing the clone. When you tried GroverH's method, did you first clear the target disk by using TI to prepare it? You would want to start with a blank destination disk so the source of the clone does not "see" any partitions on the destination disk. In fact, you should first clear the target disk and then reboot into Windows with the blank target disk attached, and then try the clone.

    If you use Vista to create a new partition it will have the 2048 sector offset. Perhaps you did this when initially installing Vista, perhaps not. But if you have restored Vista even once with Acronis True Image then, upon restoration, the offset would have been changed to 63 sectors. TI versions 11 and 12 are able to do a restoration and change the offset without triggering a need to do a repair with the Vista DVD afterwards. So if you've done one restore then your Vista partition now has 63-sector offset. There are no consequences of doing this with TI 11 or 12 since the program makes the necessary changes to insure that Vista can boot correctly.

    Only to try this by first clearing your target disk (delete any existing partitions) if you have not already done so.
     
  6. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Are you aware of this link which is listed on line 4 of my signature
    Fix Vista so a Repair is not needed after a restore or clone
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=185731

    Just curious to see where my guide failed you.

    Did you perform the clone when booted from the Rescue CD?
    Did you put the target drive in the exact place of the original before cloning?
    Did you perform the clone using manual mode?
    During the clone process, did the target space show as unallocated?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2008
  7. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi Mark and Groverh
    This morning I made what you suggest: Delete all partitions, wipe the disk com:plketely and also erase the MBR (all using ADD 10). Ok, my disk was completely clean.
    Now, I used TI 2009 to make the clone of the entire source disk to the destination disk, using manual cloning and proportional sizing of the partitions.
    Used the recue CD with ATI 2009 on it to make ther cloning.
    Placed the original disk in a slave connector and the destination disk on a primary sata connector (sata operation mod is enhanced ide in the bios)
    So, the copy took almost one hour to complete.
    The cloning finished Ok with no errors.
    After that, I disconnected the original drive and left the destination drive in the boot position.

    Boot up my system.
    After the bios, I see the first windows sign (Microsoft bar on the black screen with a small symbol moving inside) and then

    BSOD, error 0x0000007B, system stopped.

    >> So, the cloning does not work at all.

    After that, I tried this:

    I rebooted from the acronis recue CD and formatted the vista partition on the destination disk (which is now the only disk present)
    Then I put the Vista installation dvd in my dvd reader and booted on it.
    I tried a fresh install of vista on the destination disk, and here, no problem, after a while for vista installation, vista booted ok, but completely empty of all my programs.
    So, there is something missing in the cloning process that does not work with vista

    Another question:

    Now that my destination disk boots with vista, do you think that a copy of all my original partition will work if i do it? (just a try)?

    Thanks for any support on this.

    For the questions above:


    Did you perform the clone when booted from the Rescue CD? Yes
    Did you put the target drive in the exact place of the original before cloning? Yes
    Did you perform the clone using manual mode? Yes
    During the clone process, did the target space show as unallocated? Yes, intially

    Patrice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008
  8. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Thank you for the clarification.

    If you have the time, would you consider trying the clone again but this time with manual sizing as described in my cloning guide. I believe your first partition is a very small size boot or recovery partition and it should be kept the exact same size as current. It should not be resized.

    This may not ge the answer to your problems but I am curious as to what the ultimate solution will be.

    I would also suggest you wait for a response from K0lo or MudCrab or BrianK and use their suggestions prior to mine.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008
  9. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Patrice:

    I'm having trouble seeing just what went wrong; it sounds like you have done the procedure correctly. The stop error that you see, 0x0000007B, generally translates to "inaccessible boot device", so it has something to do with Windows not being able to "see" the disk correctly after the initial part of the boot process completes (the BIOS handles the initial part of the boot process). For example, not having the correct Windows SATA driver for the disk can do this. It may be helpful to get the rest of the error message text, which will contain additional information. Here is a web site with some further descriptions of this stop error and how to interpret the additional text in the error message.
     
  10. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Had K0lo not responded, my next suggestion would have been this

    Normally, I would have suggested a "Partition Restore with Resize" but since the cloning failed, this procedure would proably fail as well--since we have not completely established why it failed. This is why I am suggesting the two stage restore below as an alternative.

    If you have (or create new) a current disk type backup (where the disk option is checked), you could do a disk option restore (where the disk option is checked) to the new 500 gb disk after is has been made blank again.

    This would restore the new disk to match the old disk (same partition sizes) except this procedure would leave some unallocated space at the end. You could use your DD10 to expand your current partitions into the blank unallocated space.

    This is just something you can put on the back burner for now. Use my suggestion as the last choice.
     
  11. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    When you did this, was the image restored back to the original 320GB drive or to the new 500GB drive (or did you try both)?

    If you clear the new drive and redo the clone and then restore the image of the Vista partition to the new drive (replacing the cloned Vista partition), does it boot properly?

    Is your image of the Vista partition on your 320GB drive current? Have you restored it successfully? If so, then you might try uninstalling TI 2009, rebooting, clear the new drive, redo the clone and see if it works. Perhaps the TI drivers are causing a problem.

    It might also help to see a screenshot of the 320GB disk. Either a screenshot of Disk Management or of Disk Director (in Manual Mode) would do.

    ---

    As Grover suggests, it would be interesting to know if either an Entire Disk Image (no resizing) restore or a Restore with Resize would work properly. The problem you're having may just be limited to the cloning procedure.
     
  12. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi Mark
    Regarding the BOD content, the second parameter is always 0xC0000034 that means (according to the site you indicate: "STATUS_OBJECT_NAME_NOT_FOUND. This is the most common status code and is usually caused by a missing or corrupt driver."

    For MudCrab:
    Regarding the Restore operation I made, it was a restore on the same disk as the original partition. No problem in this case.

    WBR.

    Patrice.
     
  13. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Does your BIOS offer you the option to run the SATA in IDE mode?
     
  14. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi all again

    I tried a complete disk cloning (using the recue CD) with no resizing of partitions, in manual mode >> same issue at the boot of the system on the new disk >> error 0x0000007B, P2 = C0000034.
    I have also read in Microsoft support that this error 0xC0000034 may be also due to missing data in the boot configuration file (see http://support.microsoft.com/?scid=kb%3Ben-us%3B927391&x=14&y=12)

    Regarding IDE mode for SATA, for GroverH), yes, this is the operation mode I use.

    At the office, I ask the IT department what they think of my problems and they told me about an "anti-copy" feature in Vista, at least the first versions of the OS. Are you aware of such a feature (I use Vista Home premium and the CD is dated 2007).

    Thanks for any other advice.

    WBR.

    Patrice
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2008
  15. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    I think this only applies if you see the following error message displayed:
    If you didn't see this error then that's not the problem. However, if you'd like, post a copy of the output of the following command (entered at an elevated command prompt): bcdedit.

    Many have been able to clone or restore Vista partitions with Acronis TI, so I doubt this is an issue. I'm unfamiliar with "anti-copy" features, but the "anti-piracy" feature does not kick in until after the boot process completes, when the OS verifies that it is licensed.

    This one is a real puzzler, but going back to the stop error message that you see displayed it appears to have something to do with the disk controller. If you still have a copy of that image file that you restored successfully to your old disk, try the following:

    1. Clear the new disk again using DD by deleting the partitions and then wiping the disk. You can stop the wiping after about a minute; the objective is to wipe the first few MB of the disk clean.
    2. Restore ONLY the Vista partition from your image file to the new disk. Do not restore the MBR or any other partitions. Do this from the boot CD.

    Does this work?
     
  16. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    One question KOlo,

    Do the modifications in the bcd file indicated here:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=185731

    really work and do not damage the system? will my initial partition boot again with no problem?

    I have asked a PC technician who gave me Ghost 11 PE on a CD and even with a sector by sector clone, my system fails always with the same error.

    Regarding the access to the disk there seems to be no problem because, in reduced mode (secure mode or I do not kwnow how it is called in english), windows read all the sys files and drivers and stop then at the end of the list with BSOD 0x000007B

    Restoring the partition on another disk: I suspect I would get an error of bad sectors counbt as I saw before. And why will this be better than a simple image copy?

    IMHO, Vista is really a crappy system in this area.

    WBR.

    Patrice.
     
  17. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Patrice:

    If you have a single-boot Vista system with Vista installed to its own partition (the vast majority of PCs are set up this way) then yes, the procedure will work. This procedure is referred to as "generalizing" the BCD. In other words, all references in the BCD are to the active (booting) partition. A default installation of Vista will reference all partitions specifically by drive letter, usually C:. The problem with the default installation is that if you move a partition's starting sector then its binary partition ID changes, and the BCD loses track of where it is located. This is fixed by doing a repair with the Vista DVD. After "generalizing" the BCD you can move the Vista partition around and the boot manager will always find it because it knows to look for it in the active (booting) partition.

    I really doubt that your problem has anything to do with this since the Vista boot manager does find the location of Vista and starts to boot correctly.

    If Vista fails with the same BSOD error in Safe mode then this is really sounding like a problem related to the disk subsystem. Some potential reasons are lack of proper BIOS support for larger disks, a bad IDE driver file, motherboard problems with one of the disk interfaces, or the disk itself. We're not there yet but I think we're getting warmer.
     
  18. Patrice_bambou

    Patrice_bambou Registered Member

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    Hi all
    I finally solved my problem: it was due to a bad sector on my original disk: so what I think is happeninig:

    I think that my original disk had a bad sector (at least) that is generally processed by the HD firmware by making a copy of this sector in another area of the disk and surely outside of the partition where this sector is.

    I think also that the disk cloning does not take into account this: so the bad sectore is copied, but not the real data placed elsewhere on the disk (Remind that my original disk boots Ok with no problem).

    So, copying all partitions will not copy the bad sectors pointed information or this information is not correctly pointed by this sector >> so my 0x0000007B error.

    I tried making copies many times ,with different tools and it does never work.

    So, as a last try, I reused an (not so) old backup of my primary partition and restored it on the new partition: what happened; it worked!.

    So, I thought that the mecanism of using backup and restore was good and working well.

    So, what did I do after: I made a fresh backup of my original primary partition to another place. After that I restored the backup on the new disk.

    And what happened here: BSOD 0x0000007B! Gosh!

    So, i returned back to my previous backup, restored it again (after deleting and wiping the primary partition) on the new disk and what happened: it works!

    So, I am very happy now: I was working on this since last friday with no success. What a story and what problems!

    So, what are the lessons learned on this:

    - If you have bad sectors on your disk, then I think that TI will no fully copy the complete data and restoring such a backup may be give you some surprises. So, if Acronis TI team could check this and avoid this kind of problems. This seems extremely important as the reliability of the backups are in cause.

    - Same check for cloning operations: bad sectors shall be processed in the right way (i e the complete information must be processed).

    - Make backups regularly, as often as possible.

    - When disks become old, check the disks for bad sectors detection.

    - Finally, thank you all for your ideas and support. Thanks also to KOlo for the suggestion to restore my backup on the new partition (and it works also because this backup was not corrupted by bad sectors).

    Please make any comments if I am wrong: this is how I interpret all the problems I had sice 6 days.

    Again, thank you all.

    Patrice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2008
  19. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    That reminds me of an old saying for PC problems - when nothing seems to make sense, check the hardware. Apparently the bad sector on your source disk must have been in the file used by the disk controller driver.

    I'm not sure what happens to bad sectors on modern hard disks but I think that they are mapped out by the disk controller electronics and are never seen by the operating system until there are more bad sectors than the replacement pool can handle. I still don't fully understand why the clone or restored image contained a defective file, but at least you got things working.
     
  20. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Hoorah!
     
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