Visit the Wrong Website, and the FBI Could End Up in Your Computer

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Aug 5, 2014.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Visit the Wrong Website, and the FBI Could End Up in Your Computer.

    -- Tom
     
  2. blainefry

    blainefry Registered Member

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  3. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Right, the FBI is learning NSA tricks.

    And yes, Freedom Hosting is an old story. But making it a standard part of their toolkit isn't.

    There is one hopeful aspect. So far, they're still using Windows payloads.

     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
  4. blainefry

    blainefry Registered Member

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    Unless I missed something the most important part was the fact that it relied on a javascript exploit, and they were just lucky that at the time they rolled it out, NoScript wasn't turned on by default in the TBB.

    Isn't that about the size of it?
     
  5. Reality

    Reality Registered Member

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    Rehashing, is not the point. Ongoing developments are. I found it interesting.

    Thanks for posting lotuseclat.
     
  6. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    Did not read full article only the quotes above.

    While disturbing I can see justification for this. They are using this on criminal websites that I assume sell IDs, social security numbers,etc, kiddie porn, and sophisticated malware kits.

    There is a story in this afternoon's edition of the NYT that a Russian gang operating out of Milwaukie, has amassed a data bass that includes 1.3 BILLION passwords.

    http://www.nytimes.com/
     
  7. blainefry

    blainefry Registered Member

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    But were there really any "ongoing developments" reported? That's what I was getting at. I wasn't faulting the messenger, I was just pointing out how it sounds like they're just recycling old information.

    Everything in that article was stuff that's already been reported on. I honestly didn't really notice anything significant that could be considered new info or an "ongoing development."

    I mean someone else said something about the FBI is learning tricks from NSA, and the article kind of presents it that way in the beginning, but just a few paragraphs down it literally says how it's "nothing new" (their words) and actually states the FBI's been using that exact method "since at least 2002" (aka over a decade ago). They say the difference is that now it's "a driftnet instead of a fishing line," but I think that's more of a distinction without a difference, because as long as you have enough lines, you basically have a net anyway.

    And the stories they bring up to illustrate are the Operation Torpedo from earlier this year, and the Freedom Hosting story from last year.

    Maybe it was just that there are more details available on Operation Torpedo now.
     
  8. caspian

    caspian Registered Member

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    I wonder why only 25 users out of several thousand could be identified?
     
  9. Holysmoke

    Holysmoke Registered Member

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    funny that wired is one of the worst sites for trackers. I am getting very sick of the internets, life before it was much better.
     
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