V3 hangs Vista 64-bit system after SP1 install

Discussion in 'ESET NOD32 Antivirus' started by azz710, Sep 11, 2008.

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  1. azz710

    azz710 Registered Member

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    Folks,

    I've been using NOD32 for quite some time, now, almost without issue of any severity, let alone show-stoppers. But, sad to say, I found one of the latter this morning.

    I've been running Vista 64-bit for almost two years. Finally, last night, MS saw fit to push update SP1 to my system, after several months of delay, this as they were waiting for a new sound card driver from SigmaTel.

    But, as I say, my system is now at the SP1 level. But, now, I find that my system is hanging-up upon booting. As it hangs at different times, including whilst I'm typing my password, I made the assumption that it's either a driver or service causing the problem.

    I successfully booted in Safe mode and disabled all non-MS drivers and a couple of unneeded MS drivers as well. Then, I was able to boot normally. After at least two dozen reboots, I was able to enable everything except the two ESET services. As a cross-check, I disabled all non-MS services again exceptfor the two ESET services and, once again, my machine hung at start-up, this time even before I had a chance to click my user icon at the login screen.

    I am running without AV protection, now, so I would classify this as something of an emergency. I'll call ESET, now, but I'd like to know if any of you running Vista have seen this problem as well.

    Thanks,
    Jeff

     
  2. Eryan

    Eryan Eset Staff Account

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  3. azz710

    azz710 Registered Member

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    Dear Eryan,

    My problem has already been solved or, I should say, part of my problem has been solved. For when I saw no response here, I did my own research on various peer-to-peer forums, including this one, and found that this issue is well-known to ESET.

    For, apparently, the version I was running, 3.0.657.0, is known to be incompatible with 64-bit Vista. For me, 3.0.657.0 worked fine under 64-bit Vista, original build 6000, but caused a massive failure under 64-bit Vista SP1, build 6001.

    Not only that, the solution was known: install the current NOD32 version, 3.0.672.0., and that install can be done on top of 3.0.657.0 with no issues. So, I installed 3.0.672.0, while I had the ESET services disabled (a process which isn't covered in the KB article you sent a link for but is necessary as the system was too unstable to do anything with it enabled) and that solved the problem.

    Now, some background. When I first purchased and installed NOD32, the current version was 2, not 3. Then, at some point, long after version 3 was released, I happened to discover it accidentally while researching an unrelated problem. I installed version 3 with no issues, but sent a support question to ESET asking why there was no mechanism either for auto-upgrade or user notification of a new release which had to be manually installed (an extremely common process used by many first-class software outfits).

    I was authoritatively informed by an ESET support representative that this issue has been dealt with as version 3 will henceforth update itself. I trusted this bit of nonsense implicitly for, as NOD32 is by far the best A-V solution currently in existence, my natural assumption was that ESET's customer support processes would be as carefully crafted as the product, itself.

    But, now, when I questioned this the other day via e-mail, I was informed by an ESET representative, authoritatively once more, that not all updates will be auto-installed and that, in general, we can only count on virus definitions being auto-installed.

    My problem, then, is that we still need ESET to be more responsible and do one or more of the following for every public build of its software packages:

    1) The software should update itself or
    2) All customers should be notified by e-mail that the update exists or
    3) When a new update is available, a balloon window or equivalent should pop-up to tell us how to proceed.

    This is not optional. ESET must do this to preserve its excellent reputation, for in this wretched economy, reputations are most important.

    I started programming mainframe computers in college in 1966 and professionally in 1970. I began playing with these now-ubiquitous toy computers starting with the original IBM PC. In other words, I've had a lot of experience. And, in the early PC days, I was a fan of both Peter Norton and Symantec, which companies were independent in those days. Then, at some point, Symantec capriciously and with little notice dropped support for its flagship product, a simple, elegant database called "Q&A" and purchased Norton. And, whilst I'd started with Mr. McAfee's first free anti-virus program, I switched at some point to Norton Anti-Virus. And I watched Norton A-V gradually degrade to the point that, in 2005, it had become a great deal more trouble than it was worth. And, when it disabled my XP system to the point that I couldn't reboot, not even in Safe Mode or after the Recovery Console was used to disable all non-MS services, and the outsourced Symantec support personnel in Bangalore proved to be worth less than nothing, I did my research, discovered ESET, and installed NOD32.

    I was so happy with NOD32, which, especially compared to Norton A-V, is extremely lightweight and efficient, that I installed it on all four of our systems, my parents' system, my in-laws' system, one brothers' two systems, and the five systems belonging to friends that I support remotely, displacing twelve copies of Norton A-V and one copy of McAfee. But, now, I'm starting to read reviews of the latest Norton A-V and, apparently, it's been greatly improved and, if I can't get this issue with ESET resolved, I might be tempted to move all of them back to Symantec.

    For, despite the fact that I am capable of checking for new builds of NOD32 on a daily basis, I don't want to have to deal with this for all of the far-flung systems I support. You should also have realized by now that I'm capable of putting together a coherent English sentence. ESET should also know that I'm something of a squeaky wheel and tend to write letters to David Pogue, the Technology editor of the New York Times, and to Consumer Reports (I'm a lifetime member of its publisher, The Consumers Union). My letters tend to get published.

    So, if you haven't an answer for me, I will ask you to pass this thread up the line until it lands on the desk of someone, possibly even in Bratislava, who is empowered to do the right thing and change ESET policy to be sensitive to the needs of its customers in this regard.

    Sincerely,
    Jeff Broido
    Broido Computer Consulting


    Edit: smaller font applied for better reading
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 18, 2008
  4. Marcos

    Marcos Eset Staff Account

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    ESS/EAV have been designed to provide automatic program updates. Currently we've been releasing virus signature updates as well as component updates automatically. Component updates include the archive module, advanced heuristics, firewall, antispam module, and some other modules required by the program for functioning.

    As for the program component updates (PCU), we plan to release one when a particular version has been found to be working flawlessly for all our clients. The minor program version updates we have released are meant to fix problems reported by our clients. You should take into account that after installing a newer version new problems may emerge despite the fact that it's been tested throughly on our part. This is true for any software, including Windows. Neither Microsoft provides all hotfixes as automatic updates instantly nor email all their clients when a new hotfix is available. If you want to be notified about new product versions, you can subscribe to the appropriate RSS feed here.
     
  5. azz710

    azz710 Registered Member

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    Marcos,

    The fact remains that your policy, no matter how firmly carved in stone, causes problems for your users. I don't care for RSS, in any case, and would prefer e-mail, especially if it's targeted to our known system specifics.

    So, I reiterate what is now a demand: Send this thread up the line until it lands on the desk of an individual with 1) the power to change ESET policy, 2) the intelligence to analyze this issue without simply spouting existing policy and 3) a non-defensive approach to customer service. For defensive, arrogant customer service is absolutely guaranteed to drive away your customers, including and especially this one, who I remind you is responsible for thirteen NOD32 licenses. Absolutely guaranteed.

    Broido
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 18, 2008
  6. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    Broido , a small company like ESET is unable to inform all its customers that new version is available (when it comes to upgrade from v2 and v3) . Technically , v2 is completely different product from v3 . Automatic upgrade is impossible . Not all people would like to be upgrades from v2 to v3 . I guess the ESET intension is to have all clients slowly upgrade from the previous product to the newer one , which (the slow upgrade) will be better for company's servers and a better way to handle customer issues .

    As for build upgrades (3.0.5xx to 3.0.67x , for example) , again , the ESET company cannot provide automatic PCU due to various different reasons . Still , there are some minor issues occuring with different builds . Moreover , AFAIK , an ESET team works on even newer version of ESET products , which should be better in different aspects . Providing once upgrade to 3.0.xxx version and then to even newer one is not good .

    I am just a reseller and the above words don't represent ESET opinion . Just an advise or accept it as a workaround , may be - keep in touch with someone who cares about ESET such as a local reseller and learn the latest things from them . I my self DO inform ALL my clients at least once per month about ESET news , wins :) , updates , etc , we keep relation . I provide them a support service , not just a program/software .
     
  7. azz710

    azz710 Registered Member

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    Dear HiTech_boy,

    If, as you say, ESET is unable to inform all its customers of anything, then I say it shouldn't remain in business until it can. I find your arguments completely unpersuasive and, in any case, I don't need your service advertisement. Feh.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 18, 2008
  8. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    Not that I offer you anything :thumbd:
     
  9. dannyboy

    dannyboy Registered Member

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    the only arrogance in this thread appears to be coming from you, my friend.

    Everyone who uses software gets problems with it occasionally. Deal with it and move on.
     
  10. azz710

    azz710 Registered Member

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    Danny Boy, oh, Danny Boy,

    What will we do with you? Why, one would think that you believe that I don't like ESET, which is as far from the truth as possible, for my opinion is that NOD32 is one of the best bits of software available, let alone A-V software. One might also think that you either work for ESET or have some vested interest, beyond wanting to continue to use ESET software, in its success.

    For, you see, I wasn't attacking you. In fact, I wasn't attacking anyone, let alone ESET or my fellow users.

    Rather, I am attempting to push ESET to be a bit more proactive in its customer support efforts and to treat its customers non-defensively.

    Now, let's examine this for a moment... I don't believe in too many dichotomies. In other words, most things aren't just black or white. So, then, a thinking person can appreciate a piece of software, for example, and even believe that it's the best in its field, but dislike an aspect or two of that software and/or the company which supplies it. And, in that case, if that thinking person chooses, he or she might well try to improve the product by convincing the company that there is a problem that they can solve.

    And, in that case, doing this is by no means an attack on other, loyal customers of that company.

    But, if you choose to see my pushing of ESET as an attack upon you, do feel free. But think of this... If you attack A for criticizing B, then A is justified to call you to task, which is what I'm doing, now.

    Oh, and one more thing... If your system was disabled for hours (and perhaps you'll recall that I had no evidence at first that the problem was with NOD32 as it hung hard) and, after you resolve the problem you discover that the vendor of the responsible software was well aware of the problem for some time, exactly how might you feel?

    Say... I'll bet you're the sort of overblown patriot who tells fellow citizens who criticize an aspect of their country to love it or leave it, eh?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2008
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