US government developing ultimate cyber weapon

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Phil McCrevis, Aug 23, 2012.

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  1. Phil McCrevis

    Phil McCrevis Registered Member

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  2. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    It makes specific types of encryption a lot easier to bruteforce. That's all. Not every form of encryption relies on prime factoring.
     
  3. FWIW, Mike Adams (the maintainer of Natural News) has a bit of a reputation for being ill-informed and jumping to conclusions.
     
  4. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    The article is BS. Quantum Computing only invalidates public-key algorithms like RSA and El Gamal. It doesn't have much effect on symmetric block ciphers like AES (it will halve the AES keyspace, so if you use AES-256, it will become AES-128, which is still very strong).

    Moreover, the government is likely at least a decade away from getting a workable QC that actually does something other than factor the number 15.
     
  5. EncryptedBytes

    EncryptedBytes Registered Member

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    I'd argue even longer, at least a viable model.
     
  6. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    If there's Quantum Decryption, won't there also be Quantum Encryption as well?

    PD
     
  7. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    The point of the encryption is that you can generate the key quickly but can't bruteforce it quickly. So encrypting it faster doesn't matter.
     
  8. danleonida

    danleonida Registered Member

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    It is not needed! Encryption/decryption is easy and well within the computing capabilities of a cash register.

    Bruteforcing... That's another story!

    Keep it simple, public and use a long, disposable key. I heard somewhere that the first exiom of cryptography is something like: key longer than the plaintext, good luck if plaintext is long enough.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-time_pad
     
  9. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    Off topic posts removed. Also, please don't cross post links to other threads to get them more attention. Not every thread about encryption needs a link to that same thread.
     
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