UPS could not function properly..

Discussion in 'hardware' started by sweater, Jan 11, 2011.

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  1. sweater

    sweater Registered Member

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    Just wondering what's your thoughts on this.

    The pc Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)that was unused for about 2-3yrs and could no longer functions to operate to save power during electrical power failure. Blackout. You know how important pc ups are in saving our work, especially when power failure here in our city happens almost 2-3X a week in an unexpected manner. Electrical failure could lasts for about 30 minutes to a day, depending.

    Could it be that the battery of this pc ups was already used up or dried up coz it was unused for a longtime... 2-3 yrs.?

    I was also wondering if my ups could still maintained its power supply to my pc coz sometimes there is some up and down inconsistent electrical supply here in our city. could it affect the RAM Memory?

    Or maybe, its more better to buy a new pc ups?
     
  2. Cudni

    Cudni Global Moderator

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    from what you are saying it sounds like you need a reliable upc. I would therefore go for a new unit.
     
  3. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    From what I understand UPS batteries do lose their ability to maintain a charge after a while but 2 to 3 years sounds a bit fast (you might want to do a google search to find out more about time frames). Are you sure its only 2 to 3? Time has a way of zipping past and from experience I know I often get time frames badly wrong.

    But back to the issue.......some UPS units can have the battery replaced, you might want to check with the mfg if yours is one of them. If you decide to replace I highly recommend (and use) Liebert
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Actually, UPS typically use SLA - sealed lead acid - batteries and they typically do need to be replaced about every 3 years. The chemical process in the batteries is ongoing, whether the batteries are in use or not - that is, they have a shelf life.

    Note that I am a huge advocate of using a UPS and recommend all computers be on a good UPS with AVR - automatic voltage regulation. Surge and spike protectors are little more than fancy and expensive extension cords. A "good" UPS with AVR compensates for both high and low voltage anomalies - something no S&S protector can do. Note that battery backup during a full power outage is only the icing on the cake.

    The only real downside to a UPS is that the batteries do need periodic replacement.
     
  5. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    A UPS connects a computer directly to AC mains when not in battery backup mode. That is when a computer sees cleanest power. You will not know if that UPS has failed unless you yank that UPS power cord from the receptacle.

    A UPS is made so cheaply that most of its cost is its SLA battery. So cheaply that some of the 'dirtiest' power seen by a computer comes from a UPS in battery backup mode. So cheap that it typically needs a new battery after three years. So cheaply that a new UPS costs little more than a new battery.

    In facilities that require more reliable power, the average battery life expectancy is now approaching 20 years. But that is not what a plug-in UPS does. After two or three years, operate the computer directly from a UPS not connected to AC mains. Learn how long that UPS will provide power.

    Power loss does not damage to memory or other hardware. Power loss is a threat to unsaved data. Purpose of that UPS. To provide temporary and dirty power so that work can be finished and data can be saved. Those other rumored functions (ie voltage variation), well a computer must work normally even when incandescent bulbs dim to 40% intensity. Computers are required and routinely make voltage variations irrelevant. A UPS is for extreme voltage variations called blackouts.
     
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, we've been through this discussion before and I am not going to rehash all of it. But note I said a "good" UPS with AVR. Not all UPS are created equal, just as not all PSUs are created equal nor is the line voltage in all facilities equal either.

    And yes, according to the ATX standard, a PSU is supposed to compensate for some expected anomalies. But they can not and do not compensates for any anomalies beyond "normal" expectations, such as extended surges or extended sags (brown outs), or short spikes with large voltage potentials. Note the ATX Form Factor Standard for PSUs Paragraph 3.2.11 only requires a PSU to hold up output for 17 milliseconds in the event of an extended voltage drop. 17ms is almost twice as fast as the human eye can detect (which is about 30 frames per second or 1 frame every 33.3ms). Therefore, it is incorrect to suggest that an UPS is only for blackouts.

    Note that whole house surge protection protects your devices coming from "large" anomalies originating outside the home. They do NOT protect your computers or home theater systems from devices inside your home, or from the constant banging from smaller surges and spikes.

    The type of battery is no indication of the quality of the UPS. 20 year batteries capable of supporting the full load of a large computer are very expensive while replacing the batteries of a good 1000VA UPS with AVR using SLA batteries is about $60 - $80, including shipping (unless you buy directly from APC, then they are almost twice that).
     
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