Upgrading to a new build - help needed

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Sherlock_Holmes, Jan 24, 2016.

  1. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    After 5 years of using the current setup I want to upgrade my cpu+ram+mobo . I dont do heavy duty stuff like editing , just games and browsing . After a lot of reading I have decided that i5 is more than enough for my needs . I was previously thinking of i7 4790 but I think i5 6600 will be more than enough . Am I right ?. For games I have 650ti boost and its working well for now , will upgrade the gpu maybe in the future but not now .

    CPU - i5 6600 [ I am not planning on buying the K version since I am never gonna OC ]
    RAM - I want 16 GB but am not sure which one to get , can someone please check this list and suggest
    MOBO - Don't want a fancy mobo , just something that works
    CASE+PSU - Again nothing fancy . And will my current PSU suffice ? [ check attached image ]
     

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  2. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    It depends on the system requirements of the games you play. For just web browsing, a Core 2 Duo and 4GB of RAM is enough.
     
  3. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    Yeah I know , but I want to future proof it for another 4-5 years , and I finally have the money to upgrade so want to use it
     
  4. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    If the 650 Ti Boost is fine for you, then the i5 will be perfectly fine. Your GPU is going to by far be the biggest bottleneck here. That said, even something like a GTX980 won't be bottlenecked (In most cases) by a 6600 so you'll be good to go for a gpu upgrade in the future.
     
  5. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Understand that gaming, depending on the game, can be very "heavy duty stuff".

    Interestingly, just completing a build now with the i5 6600 (not the K version). And it is a great little power house! You don't need the more hungry K version unless you plan on getting into some serious overclocking, and you already state you are not. Also to consider, the 6600 comes with a capable cooler, you have to buy your own with the K version, adding even more to the cost. Bottom line is I think you made a wise choice here.

    The big thing you need to remember about the 6600 when buying a motherboard is it uses the LGA 1151 socket. So the motherboard must too.

    You are going backwards by selecting your RAM now. You should select your motherboard first, then select RAM that is supported by the board. This is especially important with the 6600 series because they run with either DDR3 or DDR4.

    Since future proofing seems to be a goal (again a wise choice) and you've been looking at DDR4, you need to look at these motherboards, then look on the motherboard's QVL (qualified vendors lists) of supported RAM for the RAM you want. You don't have to buy listed RAM (because there are too many for board makers to test them all) but you do need to buy RAM with the same specs as listed RAM. We are using the Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 in this build but there are many you can choose from. But to illustrate, if you look on the motherboard's website, then click on CPU/Memory Support, you can see the RAM that board supports, then go from there.

    While technically, your PSU will probably support this new hardware (IF it has the necessary connections), I recommend you buy a new supply, preferably an 80 PLUS Gold. 550 to 650W will be plenty. One of the most common mistakes by inexperienced builders and upgraders is they try to trim the budget by buying a budget power supply. That is a mistake. Feeding your high-speed digital (and expensive) computer electronics quality food (power) is essential for stable operation and long life.

    Not sure this relates/translates well in India, but I like to ask new builders here, "Would you buy a brand new Porsche then fill it up with cheap, no-name, generic fuel at the corner Tobacco and Bait shop?" You might, but an engine can miss a beat and keep running. Not so with a computer. I would urge you buy one of these.

    As far as the case, you can trim the budget here but note a good, solid case will last you many many years through many upgrades. Fancy facades and flashy lights do nothing for performance. It is the case's job to provide a good flow of cool air through the case so you want a case (I recommend a mid-tower) that has lots of fan support - preferably at least 1 140mm fan in front and 1 140mm fan in back for good front-to-back flow through the case. And I will never buy a case that does not have removable, washable air filters - so I don't have to tear-down the system to lug outside for cleaning out the heat trapping dust very often. I like Antec, Corsair, and Fractal Design cases.

    Finally, understand a new motherboard is considered a new computer. And new computers require a new Windows license. The exception is if your current Windows is a full retail license - and the vast majority are not! If your plan is to just move your hard drive to this new computer and use the Windows on that, while technically it can be done and will work, legally it is not legal.

    So to that, so you don't bottleneck the performance of all these great new components with a slow hard drive, I recommend you also buy a new 250 - 256GB SSD to use in this new computer, and install a new license of Windows 10 on it. You will be amazed at the performance. The good news is "new" (not upgraded) Windows 10 licenses come with a new EULA (licensing terms) compared to older versions of Windows and when you purchase Windows 10, it will be a full retail version that is transferable to your next computer in 5 years (as long as you uninstall it from this one). Because you want more than 4GB of RAM, just make sure you buy 64-bit Windows.
     
  6. zfactor

    zfactor Registered Member

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    i do agree on first buying or choosing the mobo before buying ram. however as far as a power supply you can even use the corsair cs or cx series and be fine. they can be had for 30-40$ after rebate usually for 500-600watt. i use A TON of them in my lower line builds and i almost never see one go bad. honestly out of literally more than 300 last year i had 2 i had to rma. imo thats excellent. and corsair rma is simply awesome imo.

    personally you could even go with a amd fx-6300 or a 8320 and save a bit and still get excellent performance. i use these chips all the time for my mid line builds and they are great chips. and even though you said you will not oc if you get a decent mobo they are stupid easy to oc.

    i do also recc getting at least a 240-256gb ssd for the main windows install. then if you need more room you can always add extra drives for storage purposes and those can be normal drives.

    i run a 8350 overclocked with a r9 380 series gpu with 32gb ram and it plays anything i throw at it. if you go with the amd chip and save a bit you can put more into the rest of the system. im not saying the 8350 will perform like the i7 but imo they will do anything i need of them.
     
  7. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    [QUOTE="CrusherW9, post: 2558828, member: 131966"Your GPU is going to by far be the biggest bottleneck here[/QUOTE]

    Can you explain the bottleneck here please
     
  8. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    Thanx for such a detailed response . I already have 2 SSD's on my PC so that is covered . For the mobo I selected these preferences , then the first one has many reviews and looks good for my purpose . Then according to that I have selected this RAM . Is that good ?
     
  9. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    When it comes to anything PC related, there's always a limiting component. A component that makes upgrading a different one show little or no gain. When it comes to gaming, that's going to be either your CPU or GPU. When you get into the higher end GPUs, your CPU can prevent your GPU from working to it's max potential because it can't keep up. In your case, it's the opposite. The 6600 will keep up with even a GTX980 in most games. You mentioned potentially upgrading your GPU in the future so you'd be set with basically anything you get short of maybe a 980ti or Titan X.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2016
  10. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    Those individual cards are 2x-3x more costly than my build ! I am not gonna spend so much for a GPU . So I think I am set . Thanx for the help
     
  11. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I personally would not recommend the CX line from Corsair. Sadly, these entry level supplies from Corsair have not lived up to the reputation Corsair PSUs initially earned.

    As far as that GPU being a bottleneck, maybe that is the correct term, but not sure I would call it that because it will not really hold back the performance of your other components. That is, they will not be sitting in wait states as they might while waiting on a harddrive or slow Internet connection. That said, improving graphics is almost always a good thing.

    You will still get good game play with at GPU - but more GPU horsepower is always nice too.
     
  12. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Lot of good has been given. So my experience will repeat some. Ime the 2 easiest components to screw up are the PSU & mobo. Back in my day (years ago) Seasonic, Antec & Corsair were the best PSU. And the most most dependable mobos by FAR were Asus.

    Do your research on a good PSU.
    Do NOT buy a cheap, poor quality, no name, under powered, used or refurbished PSU!
    Do NOT buy a cheap, poor quality, no name, under powered, used or refurbished PSU!
    Do NOT buy a cheap, poor quality, no name, under powered, used or refurbished PSU!
     
  13. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    Can you please check the mobo and RAM selection in post #10
    edit - I meant post #8
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  14. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Saw your preferences for mobo. My understanding of quality brands is old & Idk if it still applies. And certainly couldn't pick out a specific mobo. But of the brands listed my preference order is Asus, Gigabyte, AsRock & MSI.

    The way things used to be, don't know if it's still true.
    All ASUS were top quality. GigaByte were 95%+ perfect. ASRock was ASUS little brother steady but not cutting edge. MSI were cutting edge but quality was hit & miss & could fubar 2-18 months down the road.

    Always liked G.Skill memory. Check if those heat fins will fit your mobo.

    Oh see if AMD will fit your CPU needs. Could be big savings.
     
  15. zfactor

    zfactor Registered Member

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    i can assure you my experience does not at all reflect that. we sell literally HUNDREDS of them. i will not carry anything less expensive then these and i have now eliminated everything except these >>>at this price range<<<. i almost never see these come back. they put out solid power albeit not going to be strong as a 100$ power supply but for the cost of them imo they are great. is there better? yes of course FAR better. but again if working within a lower end budget these imo are THE best choice for those who want a cheaper power supply. again note my words budget and cheap. i would MUCH rather someone use a cs or cx then on of those junk 29$ newegg sells that weighs about 6oz and is basically empty. as well these are far better then the junk ones you get with a oem system from hp or dell.
     
  16. zfactor

    zfactor Registered Member

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    forgot to add as far as motherboards go the only brand i will not use anymore is gigabyte. imo way to many returns and issues with them and again this is imo their warranty dept sucks. we sell and i use personally asus, asrock, msi, and some models of biostar for super budget builds. honestly the asrock boards are almost always rock solid i personally use them in my own builds and the few times i have had to rma a board it went quick and super easy. if it was me i would choose between asus and asrock. msi is decent but i do see more failures than i like to see.
     
  17. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    We have completely the opposite opinion. I do like Corsair, just not their entry level PSUs so we stopped supplying them here. I prefer Seasonic and lately have been going with EVGA PSUs. And Gigabyte is my preferred brand for motherboards, with ASUS next. We have not seen more returns for Gigabyte than other brands. As far as their warranty, again we have different experiences. In fact, they RMA'd a board for me that was 4 years old - a full year out of warranty. They earned my loyalty from that and have done nothing since to lose it. I realize others have had less enjoyable experiences, but I am saying that has happened with all brands at some point or another.

    I also like ASRock and MSI. I've made a few builds with BioStar and while I was not particularly impressed with BioStar, they work and have not failed. My first personal build was with a SuperMicro. I retired it after 12 years of solid service.
     
  18. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Wonder if zfactor and Bill_Brights differing experiences with Gigabyte is down to different locations ?
     
  19. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    I remember reading on reddit , everyone was against ASUS mobo's and most of them were happy with ASROCK and GIGABYTE
     
  20. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Don't know. As noted, I am in the US. I don't know where zfactor is but it seems if Gigabytes in his country were that bad, there would be many complaining from there.
     
  21. zfactor

    zfactor Registered Member

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    im in florida usa. have not been a gigabyte fan for some 10 years or so personally. honestly i miss dfi boards.
     
  22. Sherlock_Holmes

    Sherlock_Holmes Registered Member

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    This is going to be my final build -

    CPU
    MOBO
    RAM
    CABINET not yet decided - either 1 , 2 , 3
     
  23. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, not sure what to tell you. No doubt the Gigabyte boards I get here in Nebraska from Newegg are the same models as you get from Newegg down there in Florida. And we've had great luck with them there. Yeah, I forgot about DFI. Their LanParty boards were nice.
     
  24. zfactor

    zfactor Registered Member

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    i actually buy from distributors not newegg
     
  25. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Same difference - or should be anyway. The point I was making is in Europe and in Asia (and some times South America), it is not uncommon for them to use different revisions of the same board. Some times, the different revisions have slightly different features or specs, some times it just designates a different factory they were produced in.

    Either way, with you being in the US, you should be getting the same models and revision numbers as me. And my point is, we've been using Gigabyte boards almost exclusively in our builds for years and have found them to be very reliable and dependable. And while I cannot say their tech support is top notch (or a good as it was 10 - 15 years ago), I cannot say that for ASUS, MSI or any maker either, sadly.
     
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