Understanding Linux file extensions.

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Close_Hauled, Jul 11, 2004.

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  1. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    In a recent post;

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=40430

    I talked about how I had a problem accesing the partitions on a Proliant DL380 with a Linux boot disk provided by;

    Offline NT Password & Registry Editor
    http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/

    The disk provides the necessary drivers do access the drives on the SCSI controllers. The DL380 that I have uses the “cciss.o.gz”, and “aic7xxx.o.gz” drivers for its two controllers. The RAID controller is a Smart Array 5i, which uses the CCISS driver. The other controller is the ProLiant 64-Bit/66-Mhz Dual Channel Wide Ultra3 SCSI, which uses the aic7xxx driver.

    My ignorance of Linux is making it difficult to locate the updated drivers for these controllers. I have searched the HP web site for drivers, but there are so many flavors of Linux that it makes it difficult to know which to choose. The file extensions are also confusing. Like ".rpm" and ".o.gz".

    I just need help in finding the latest versions of these drivers and incorporating them in the boot disk.

    Here are the different versions of Linux that are supported by HP.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 » 7.10 » 7.00
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 » 7.10 » 7.00 » 6.40 » 6.30
    Red Hat Linux 8.0 » 7.10 » 7.00 » 6.40 » 6.30
    Red Hat Linux 7.3 » 7.10 » 7.00 » 6.40 » 6.30
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 7.0 » 7.10 » 7.00 » 6.40 » 6.30
    UnitedLinux 1.0 » 7.10 » 7.00 » 6.40 » 6.30

    Any help is welcome.

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  2. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    As you said, there ar emany distributions of linux, many have their own packaging system, many use a packaging system created by a larger distribution, many use a generic tarball. Here is a quick break down

    .rpm is a Red Hat package it is the most widely use package system in the linux world. Many dists use it (mandrake, suse etc.)

    .deb is another big one, this time from Debian Linux. Debian is the most widely used Distibution for people who are concerned with security more than fancy mouse pointers

    .ebuild for linux gentoo (the one I use now)

    .tgz -- Slackware uses this.

    then there are the generic archives and compressed formats:

    tar.gz -- the tarball, archived with tar, compressed with gz. This was all there was before the newer packages came along. Most systems still can use it, but the install is a bit more manual.

    and some newer achived and compressed
    .bz2 -- bzipped version 2
    .tbz2 -- tarred bzipped version2

    just found this:

    http://www.mygamecompany.com/Linux/downloads.htm
     
  3. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    So what you are saying is that these are like Zip files. What about the ".o.gz" extension?

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  4. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    yes, gz is a compression utility.
    tar is an archiving utility

    zip/rar/ace for windows archive and compress.

    archiving is the act of creating one file with metatdata out of a bunch of files. This activity was originally created to store file on a tape drive. Tape drive have limited access points so this was important. Archiving in itself does not compress files.

    compressing is what it sounds like.

    so a .tar.gz tarball is a bunch of files archived together, then compressed. As I said earlier, zip would do both these steps in one. Almost all of the compression/archiving tools in the *nix world support flags to do both steps in one.

    a .o file is an object file. An object file is a file compiled from source code into a binary file, but with no execution point. it must be linked either statically or dynamically by an executable file. In windows the equivelent to a .o would be a .dll file. In the *nix world there are other object files as well like .so and .elf. These files offer functionality that many programs will want to use, enabling the reuse of code.

    so a .o.gz file is a object file that has been compressed by gz. Ofcourse, just like zip, a person could change a file extension of some other file to .o.gz if they were misguided in some way. In that case the gz tool would not recognize the file contents.
     
  5. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Thanks, I noticed that about the ".o.gz" file after I posted last. I opened the file with WinZip and the ".o" file was in it.

    Thanks for your time, I think I am getting the hang of this.

    Let's go back to the .RPM format for minute, because they are available from HP. You said that that is a distribution format. Then I should be able to view files within it and extract the ones that I need. Assuming that they will work with my flavor of Linux.

    Which brings up more questions:

    The boot disk has all of the SCSI drivers in a ".o.gz" format. If HP provides the drivers inside the ".rpm" format, then how do I extract them in a Windows environment and convert them to ".o.gz"?

    When choosing the correct driver, do I have to concern myself with what flavor of Linux that is on the floppy? I still have not been able to determin which flavor is on the boot disk.

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  6. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    An RPM can be converted to .tar.gz (which are natice to solaris, SUN's unix derivitive. it is a cousin to linux as is freeBSD)

    the files in the tarball can be extracted. There is no guarantee the files will be compatable though. At this point it gets a bit trial and error. Some dists have slightly different low level files. system files are often not interchangeable betreen dists.

    it will probable be imperative you determine the dist on the floppy.
     
  7. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Thanks again. I appreciate it more than you know.

    I have downloaded cpq_cciss-2.4.48-12.rh80.i686.rpm from HP and I want to extract the cciss.o file in a Windows environment. How do I do that?

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  8. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    I don't know of any apps that can extract object files from rpms in a windows environment.

    someone might have ported rpm2cpio
    to windows but I don't know who would ever do such a thing since any file extracted would be useless there.

    Normally, if a person knows that they need an object file, they usually have a linux install. Most non or new linux people don't know much about linux object files so there isn't a need for a windows port.

    Windows apps to make linux boot floppies abound because many new linux people have a windows install.
     
  9. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    I guess that I should build my own Linux machine. I have an old SE440BX2 laying around that I will use. Do you have any recommendations on where to get the OS for free?

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  10. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    lol well, which dist is best for what purpose is one of the those flame war type questions in the linux world. My advice is to do some research into what is best for you.

    That said, here is a quick overview. I'll not mention more than a handfull of common dists. PLEASE don't ask: "I just heard about linux <XZY> is it any good?" There are so many flavors out there and I don't feel like researching them all. Here is what I know:

    if you want the most support for hardware, need ease of install/use, aren't terribly concerned with security (still better than MS any day of the week):

    Mandrake/RedHat/Suse

    If you want serious security above all else and are willing to fight though video/sound card issues, have less hardware support, and spend a lot of time on the command line (most problems ARE solvable but I'm not doing it all for you):
    debian/slackware

    If you wish to compile every package yourself with specific support, have good security and use more exotic cpus like the amd_64 without paying money (amd_64 support cost money on other dists if they support it at all) :
    gentoo

    I use gentoo now. I like it alot because I know what not to install. And I have an amd_64 bit processor so I really had no choice if I wanted to utilize the benefits without paying. I have used Debian alot and it is rock solid but doesn't support the newest hardware. I have also used Mandrake alot and it is really easy to use, but beware the root kit.

    Also there are other options to linux like freeBSD and Sun Solaris fo PC ($20). These are similar to linux and can share some software packages.

    Again: PLEASE don't inquire about dists I didn't mention ('cause I'll ignore them)
     
  11. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    OMG this is not gonna be as easy as I had hoped. :eek:

    Well I know that my board choice is a good one, because the Intel SE440BX-2 was VERY common. So, I will start with the FREE! stuff first.

    I am downloading Gentoo Linux right now:

    http://gentoo.osuosl.org/releases/x86/2004.1/packagecd/x86/packages-x86-2004.1.iso

    I hope I have the right one, because it's 638 meg! :eek:

    P.S. I am downloading Knoppix too! :rolleyes:

    http://mirror.csit.fsu.edu/knoppix/KNOPPIX_V3.4-2004-05-17-EN.iso

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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2004
  12. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    funny story, Gentoo uses a stripped down version of knoppix to install :)

    Il'll add Knoppix to the list of dists I'll discuss because it is the best one to run from a cd with no install. Also the best one to use to pull the rug out from under the root permissions of any other linux install because it will mount the HD install as data. ;)
     
  13. nick s

    nick s Registered Member

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    Went from a Knoppix HD install, to RedHat, to SUZE, and finally Gentoo. A lot of work, but I learned the most with Gentoo.

    Nick
     
  14. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    I am not surprised. If you bootstrapped form source, you'd learn alot before desktop.
     
  15. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    I finally found time to start working with Linux again. I have started with the Knoppix CD that I downoaded above. I used it on several machines and it works great. I ran it on a Dell OptiPlex GX270, a Compaq Proliant DL380, and an Intel D850GB. As a matter of fact, I am using it right now on the D850GB at home. I did not have to configure or install a thing! Not even for my Internet access. It's so cool.

    I used it to browse the web. I accessed my bank account, and download and played music. I installed Macromedia Flash player and went to Joe Cartoon and had some fun.

    Now I am trying to install the NVidia FreeBSD drivers for the GForce FX 5700. I am having some problems figuring it out. Fortunately, I have enough Unix skills, that I can figure it out.

    I will keep you updated.

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    Last edited: Jul 16, 2004
  16. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    are you sure you want freBSD and not linux drivers?
     
  17. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    I don't know whether I should use FreeBSD, or Linux IA32. The NVidia web site does not give you too many choices. Maybe you can take a look at it.

    I posted a question on the Knoppix forum, but no answer yet.

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  18. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    I would use the linux drivers, since that is what os you are using. That said, the freeBSD drivers might work but I keep that option only as a last resort.
     
  19. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Thanks once again. I figured that out last night. Now that I have this all figured out, I am going to go back to my real goal, which is to get the Proliant DL380 working with the flavor of Linux that comes with the Offline Password and Registry Editor. But here are my DL380 driver choices:

    » Red Hat Linux 8.0
    » Red Hat Linux 7.3
    » Red Hat Linux 7.2
    » Red Hat Linux 7.1
    » Red Hat Linux 7.0
    » Red Hat Linux 6.2
    » Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1
    » Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 (x86)
    » UnitedLinux 1.0/SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 8
    » SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 7
    » SUSE Linux 7.0
    » SUSE Linux 7.2 Professional

    Which of these can I use with Knoppix? I Just sent an email to the author of the editor. Hopefully, he'll respond.

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  20. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    Sounds like a good idea to me.
     
  21. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    I just read through the c source code. it doesn't look very dist dependant. he did mention using the 2.4.* kernel.

    he also said you can try any driver you wish, it will just crash if it can't load. This is alpha software so play with a throw-away install.
     
  22. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    I did not mean Knoppix here, I meant the Offline Editor. Sorry for not proof reading better.

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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2004
  23. UNICRON

    UNICRON Technical Expert

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    I knew that :). the source code I reffered to was from Offline editor.
     
  24. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    I am working on the DL380. I have the Knoppix CD installed and running. I have a floppy with cpq_cciss-2.4.50-18.rh80.i686.rpm on it. I used Alien in the root shell to create a cpq-cciss_2.4.50-19_i386.deb file. I then tried:

    alien -i /mnt/floppy/cpq_cciss-2.4.50-18.rh80.i686.rpm

    To ry and install the resulting .deb file. I always get this message:

    dpkg: unable to access dpkg status area: Read-only file system

    I know I'm getting close.
     
  25. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    The Offline Password & Registry Editor uses BusyBox. Not sure exactly what BusyBox is, but it is referred to as the "Swiss Army Knife of Embedded Linux". The boot disk says that it is using Linux kernel 2.4.23.
     
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