UltraSurf claims it's malicious behavior a "trick"

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by SteveTX, Aug 28, 2009.

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  1. SteveTX

    SteveTX Registered Member

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    Hello folks, back for a few minutes, then off to the servers again (5 new projects o_O )

    http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/082809-chinese-anticensorship.html

    UltraSurf / GIFC is now claiming their exposed malware's violations of security and anonymity principles as a trick to fool the Chinese firewall. It would appear the only one being tricked are the users. The article fails to explain how doing all of these things has any effect on the chinese firewall, nor does it make sense on the face of it. How exactly *does* requesting military/financial/gov/edu logins assist in any way other than acting as a large blinking siren? I am mystified, that is certain. If we were able to find UltraSurf stealing your passwords or emptying your bank account, I am sure they would claim that too was just a trick for your protection.

    REMEMBER: There is no legitimate explanation for a proxy network turning off SSL certificate checking except to perform MITM attacks/Sniffing.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2009
  2. MakePB

    MakePB Registered Member

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    I thought that Bensec have already very well explained your REMEMBER: 'evidence':
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=237184&page=7


    Then it seems that they have not confused only Chinese firewall but and the people behind XeroBank:
    '“There are many built-in tricks that do all kinds of things to confuse the firewall,” says David Tian, a scientist for NASA who works spare-time on UltraSurf, the free software designed to promote unrestricted Internet access for citizens of China persecuted for being members of Falun Gang, the religious group the Chinese government is trying to suppress'.

    At least they have response to 'evidence'. That's progress. Probably more responses from their side will come in future.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2009
  3. stap0510

    stap0510 Registered Member

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    Not to burst your bubble, but what you've quoted is not really an explanation.
    He only states that it serves a function, but now exactly how. His statement is atmost general, but not really an indepth answer that I would like to see.
    But I'm slightly interested in more information about the operations of this program.

    Perhaps more is coming from David Tian.
    Although I'm suprised that the guy behind it works for NASA, who would've guessed?
     
  4. MakePB

    MakePB Registered Member

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    What i have quoted is means more ironical to Steve and company who tried to blame all other products.

    The guy as David Tian who work for NASA would probably not be involved
    in something what Steve and the guys behind XB would like to see.

    I understand that US is direct competition of XB but blame everything on the Net what is not based on XB technology is miserly.

    I hope that more light on this problem would come directly from team behind US in the future.

    btw
    More news:
    Developer denies software to beat Chinese censors is malicious
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2009
  5. Bensec

    Bensec Registered Member

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    xb vpn will remain the best private line in its eyes until one day it suddenly find out how easily gfw block it and turn this most valuable and secured service in the world into bullshit "Connection Reset"s here. Of course this isn't likely to happen, unless xb's kind enough to launch a massive free trial and attract hundreds of thousands mainland users, pissing gfw off.:D


    I hope the same, but I think it's unlikely, at least to us. As I said the exploratory algorithm to find proxy servers might be the key to break the software. Before you get that, you will never figure out what is the next weird IP the program is gonna connect (of course this doesn't include the public ssl verification links Steve mentioned before, or dummy connection link as the developer explained).

    Actually dummy traffic is a good point. Because, if you do reverse dns, you will find all their proxy servers are hosted by the same ISP in the US. If an average user does n't know English, it is unlikely that he will visit popular English sites(especially SSL connections). If he doesnt browse in English then why his ISP found out that his account has a high SSL connection volume with several unknown servers from the same ISP in US ?? P2P software cant explain that because peers are more likely to be from different ISPs and more likely to be non-SSL. I am thinking from the user's point of view but you can also analyze it in a different direction, for example, from the developer's view, like how to protect the proxy server from detection so as to extend its life span as long as possible? Anyway, it's sad to see Steve praising his traffic mixing to the sky while denies other's method against traffic analysis and step it to the ground. :thumbd: If that point is true, before this free tool can involve more servers from different ISPs around the world, that behavior is unlikely to change.

    Tor now keep certain relays to themselves as bridge and not publish them in the directory. This is useful. Public methods are no longer enough to defy censorship which is exhausting nationwide resources here. The situation is worsening. oct 11th... is coming. I can't wait to find out which free tool at my hand can survive this "harsh" fall.

    If xb wants to open market in china the time is coming! Now launch your free trial. Service with less user is more likely to survive. If your service can provide good access to You-tube, I will be glad to be the 1st trial user.;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
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