Trying out Linux

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by beethoven, May 6, 2010.

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  1. beethoven

    beethoven Registered Member

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    I am curious about linux and would like to try out some distro.

    I understand that apart from installing linux I can test the waters by either using a live cd or Wubi. So I downloaded the mint iso file, burnt it and booted up without problems :D

    However I am a bit uncertain about the limitations of using the live cd. If you use firefox straight from the cd, I guess you cannot save any bookmarks? How about thunderbird, in order to download messages, you would need to save them. I realise that I can access my actual harddrive or any other harddrive via the file manager but am I correct in assuming that the live cd is not for making changes, installing further programs etc. As the cd is burnt, you would need to install permanently, right? In that case I would have to deal with partitioning :doubt:

    As for Wubi, where would the installation of files downloaded during Wubi sessions happen - within the wubi folder structure or outside among my normal windows stuff?
     
  2. dan_maran

    dan_maran Registered Member

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    Boot into windows and launch wubi :) Then you can save your bookmarks, email, etc. so if you like it then you can delve into the world of partitioning.
     
  3. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Make a live USB and you can increase the size of persistent data as well, then you can save your work in it.
     
  4. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Easier would be to just use Virtualbox in Windows and install Mint there. it will be faster than a LiveCD and not as much hassle as setting up a persistent USB, which is not easy to do for a newb.
     
  5. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Having used livecds in the past, and some distros in vmWare in the not too distant past, I will just tell you that when you decide to install on a live machine, it can be much different than installing on a virtual machine. I know squat about linux, but never had any problem at all on vmWare with any distro I personally tried.

    The same cannot be said of my foray into a real box. Older hardware likely complicates matters, but it is definately a different experience.

    Sul.
     
  6. Trespasser

    Trespasser Registered Member

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    I think I agree with likuidkewl, do a Windows-Wubi install. You can boot into Mint easily from within Windows and exit easily as well. If you don't like Linux then an uninstall is as easy as visiting Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel.

    Later...
     
  7. Woody777

    Woody777 Registered Member

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    WUBI sure sounds nice but----the last time I used it it did not uninstall properly & I wound up with a mess on my Hard Drive. Now the Hard Drive is damaged maybe not for that reason. I will not use it again.. Puppy Linux would in fact do what you want it to do. It writes a small file to your Hard Drive & saves its settings but makes no real changes to the hard drive. Also if it is no a CD or DvD & the disc is not finalized it will write to that.
     
  8. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    hmmm ...cd run on ram when you shut down every thing on cd is gone so if you want to save any thing you can only save downloaded files .........etc on accessing your hardisk anything you save on live cd or what ever you tweak will be gone on reboot it come to default mode

    now
    option 1: if you have another hardisk you can install linux on it (recommend) if you have desktop

    option 2: install on usb drive or pen drive atleast of 4 Gb

    option 3: you can install it via Windows-Wubi install

    option 4: make your own partition easy way with gparted and install on it

    now here you have again 2 options

    a) install linux grub on mbr means that install linux boot loader over your windows boot loader

    b) install boot loader it on / ( root partition) and then from windows install a software called EasyBCD and give a link of your linux from it

    please check this

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=268236

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=269303

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=227959

    also if you can wait a little more about a week or so because mint 9 final release would be on his way and its LTS (long term supported)

    :)
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2010
  9. beethoven

    beethoven Registered Member

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    Thanks guys,

    I think I will use an older pc and install fully. That way I get to learn more, can freely install new packages, figure out partitions etc without freaking out that I might accidentally nuke my main drive.
    I guess I can partition the drive in a way that lets me install different distros over time to continue my exploration.

    As for grub or bootloader, ...babysteps.;)
     
  10. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    making partition are very easy with gpatred you can even shrink your c partition and get a little space out of it

    all you need is drag the partition backwards form right to left from gparted tool

    also make ext4 you can install many different distros on it


    check this one if you haven't

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=265473

    its easy :))
     
  11. steve161

    steve161 Registered Member

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    It is not as hard as it seems. When I did my first dual boot, I had my fingers crossed. But now I only do custom partitioning, and I am quite the novice (damn you gui's)
     
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