TrueCrypt: "Error: No bootable partition found"

Discussion in 'encryption problems' started by arturocohen, Jul 9, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    Problem resolved. See update at bottom.

    Hello,

    SHORT STORY
    I am running a TrueCrypt-encrypted Windows 7 laptop. When I try to log in, it says: "Error: No bootable partition found." If I press enter after that, it says, "Booting..." and the system remains idle after that.

    The error message comes after I type in the correct password. It will let me know if I've typed in the wrong password.

    So while I know the password, I cannot find the recovery CD/DVD, which -- to my understanding -- would allow me to repair the boot loader. It is also my understanding that recovery CDs/DVDs are unique to each installation of TrueCrypt -- so it's not possible to create a disk from another machine.

    What are my alternatives? My simple goal is to recover/access the data. I purchased a new laptop (a Mac) -- so I don't need to use the disk to run a system.

    ADDITIONAL INFO
    Also, to give a bit of background as to how this has happened: my laptop battery life progressively got worse while on vacation. I was in an area with frequent power outages. The battery would die with 7% life remaining. Two weeks later, it would die with 20-30% remaining. Charges wouldn't last more than an hour.

    The battery died while in use maybe over a dozen or two dozen times over the course of a month. My guess is that damaged the hard drive.

    During my last Windows session, I got some error message saying that the disk has been corrupted or data is missing -- something to that effect. It then asked me if I wanted to run some recovery/repair tool. And it began to do that, but the system then restarted. Since then the "No bootable partition" error message has come up right after the BIOS have loaded.

    Once after the initial boot loader problem arose, I also received this message -- "Error: BIOS reserved too much memory: 555" But I haven't received it since.

    Thank you.

    UPDATE

    The problem was resolved. I am now able to access my data. Here's how I did it:

    1) I extracted the TrueCrypt encrypted hard drive and replaced it with a new hard drive (which I had to purchase).

    2) The new hard drive had no OS, so I installed Ubuntu on it (from a CD I made on another computer).

    3) I installed TrueCrypt for Ubuntu on the new hard drive. I did not encrypt the system.

    4) I put the old hard drive in a USB enclosure (which I had to purchase) and connected it to the laptop.

    5) I opened up TrueCrypt in Ubuntu, chose Slot 1, and then selected the right device for on the USB hard drive.

    6) I clicked on 'Mount', selected 'Mount partition using system encryption (preboot authentication).

    7) I put in my password and clicked OK and wallah -- when I clicked on Home Folder in Ubuntu, the USB drive was available (was named true crypt).

    I was able to drag files from the USB HDD to the desktop. I could open them, put them on other USB drives, etc.

    What I am not sure is if I can repair the bootloader on the USB drive and put it back into my laptop. But that's not important for me. I have my data. That's all I wanted. The laptop is now usable again as it has a new hard drive. I actually purchased a Mac in the midst of this 'crisis.' So now I have another laptop to use.

    Hope this helps you guys and thank you once again to all those who helped.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  2. happyyarou666

    happyyarou666 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Posts:
    802
    id say you got a corrupted bootloader my friend , without the recovery cd theres no hope i must tell you thou , sorry , maybe next time you wont forget where you put your recovery cd wich is very IMPORTANT!!!!!
     
  3. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    But what if I take the hard drive out of the laptop, put it into an external drive enclosure, and run it as a secondary drive via USB?
     
  4. happyyarou666

    happyyarou666 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Posts:
    802
  5. dantz

    dantz Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Posts:
    993
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Yes, that's exactly what you should do. Install TC in another computer, connect your current system drive to it as an external drive and then use the "mount without preboot authentication" feature to mount your system volume and access your data.

    Once you have access you can make a copy of the "TrueCrypt Rescue Disk.iso" file and use it to burn a fresh rescue disk, and then you can put your system drive back into your computer and use the newly created rescue disk to restore your bootloader (if it's even bad, which I doubt). However, I strongly suggest that you back up all of your data while your drive is connected as an external drive, because your hard drive might be failing and Windows might be corrupted.

    Another approach (using the same "mount without preboot authentication" command) would be to boot your laptop from a live cd that has TC on it, plug in some sort of external storage media, and back up your data files to that.
     
  6. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    Thank you, Dantz.
     
  7. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    Two more questions. Appreciate the help so far.

    My laptop with the corrupted TrueCrypt bootloader was a Windows 7 (64-bit) machine.

    I removed the drive and purchased a new one.

    I'll put the old, corrupted TrueCrypt drive into a USB-enabled enclosure.

    The new drive, however, doesn't have an operating system on it. I know I have to install TrueCrypt on the new drive.

    But should the operating system also be the same as the original drive? Or can I install Ubuntu?

    Also, should my TrueCrypt password be the same, or does that not matter?

    Thank you.
     
  8. dantz

    dantz Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Posts:
    993
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Ubuntu should work, but I'm no Ubuntu expert and I can't advise you on that.
    All you need to do is install TC in your new OS, not use it to encrypt anything, so there's no reason at all to make a new password. Once the program is installed merely use it to mount your system volume in your external disk using "mount without preboot authentication" (I think this feature has a slightly different name in the Linux version).
     
  9. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    Thanks. I've done that, but now I get a message:

    "Incorrect password or not a TrueCrypt volume."

    Also, when I connect the old HDD via the USB enclosure, it makes a clanking noise.
     
  10. arturocohen

    arturocohen Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Posts:
    6
    Actually, I put in the wrong HDD. It was from an old laptop of mine.

    I just put in the right one and it worked! THANK YOU. I can access all of my data.

    I see some may have given up on this in the past, but if you know your password, it's definitely possible.

    Thanks again!! I can't tell you how critical this data was for me.
     
  11. redcell

    redcell Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010
    Posts:
    126

    Glad to hear such relieving news. You should update your main post.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.