True Image & Linux problem

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Artistar, Oct 31, 2007.

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  1. Artistar

    Artistar Registered Member

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    I have Vista/Debian dual-boot on one hard disk and use True Image v11.0.
    Since it supports Linux file system i did a backup of a Debian's partition. Later i restored reinstalled Vista and restored Debian back on it's partition, and recreated GRUB boot menu using Ubuntu's Live CD.
    Everything went well, but now i can't boot Debian.... I select it from the GRUB menu, but then it just stops booting on the first step: "Uncompressing Linux kernel, please wait.... OK."

    Does anyone have a clue what could be wrong?

    Thanx in advance. :)
     
  2. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Artistar:

    Does your version of Debian use UUIDs to identify partitions? If so and if you did anything to affect the partition that Debian boots from then the UUID may have changed, so the one in your menu.lst file is incorrect.

    You can fix this by letting GRUB start up and then move the OS selection cursor to the line that boots Debian. Press "E" to edit the line and change the UUID= entry to the standard /dev/hdax and then see if it boots. Once back in Debian, look up the UUID for the partition and manually edit your /boot/grub/menu.lst file to reflect the new UUID.
     
  3. Artistar

    Artistar Registered Member

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    Well, i tried using True Image with Debian & Ubuntu, and when i restore them to their (intact) partitions, GRUB is always messed up. It's always pointing that the OS is located on hd0,6 instead on hd0,3.
    Also, i used to fix this problem with the method that you wrote, and the result is: Ubuntu boots properly and Debian hangs on that error....

    I really don't know what to do anymore - it doesn't make sense.... I think that GRUB is probably messed up badly.... o_O
     
  4. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Artistar:

    Make sure that not only is the disk reference correct (hdx,y) but also that the lines that reference the kernel and the initial ramdisk image are correct.

    For example, here is one on my disk that boots Kubuntu from the first primary partition on the disk [(hd0,0) in grub lingo] and the kernel/initrd files on the same partition, and the first logical partition (/dev/sda5) is the linux root partition:
    Code:
    title	Kubuntu 7.04
    root	(hd0,0)
    kernel	/vmlinuz-2.6.20-16-386 root=/dev/sda5 ro quiet splash
    initrd	/initrd.img-2.6.20-16-386
    Perhaps you can post the GRUB stanza that you are using to boot into Debian?
     
  5. Artistar

    Artistar Registered Member

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    Yup, here it is:

    Code:
    title		Debian GNU/Linux, kernel 2.6.22-2-686
    root		(hd0,5)
    kernel		/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.22-2-686 root=/dev/hda6 ro quiet 
    initrd		/boot/initrd.img-2.6.22-2-686
    savedefault
    According to Debian's Disk Manager, Swap is on hda5, and Ext on hda6, and that has always been like that.
    I also encountered sth else. After restoring Debian it's impossible to repartition it with Debian's or Ubuntu's partitioner. It just doesn't recognize partitions, but the whole HDD only.
    Then i have to run Disk Director and delete both Linux partitions in order to see the Disk partitioned again, like there's sth on Ext preventing it.... Strange.
     
  6. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Artistar:

    Your GRUB stanza looks correct, assuming that swap is on the first logical partition and Debian is on the second.

    About the "strange" problem, how was Debian shut down before you created the image of its partition? Was it suspended to disk (hibernated)? I've accidentally done that a couple of times on my laptop and got similar results.
     
  7. Artistar

    Artistar Registered Member

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    It closed correctly, and i don't use hibernation....
     
  8. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Perhaps then it is a problem with TI 11? I use TI 10 and have always found my Linux partitions to be perfectly restored with TI 10.

    One other bit of confusion -- in post # 4 you said that after restoring GRUB it thinks that the OS is on (hd0,6) instead of on (hd0,3). Translating from GRUB lingo, that means that it thinks the OS is on the 3rd logical partition instead of on the 4th primary partition:

    (hd0,0) = hda1 = primary 1
    (hd0,1) = hda2 = primary 2
    (hd0,2) = hda3 = primary 3
    (hd0,3) = hda4 = primary 4
    (hd0,4) = hda5 = logical 1
    (hd0,5) = hda6 = logical 2
    (hd0,6) = hda7 = logical 3

    In your post #5 you show swap on logical 1 and Debian on logical 2.
     
  9. Artistar

    Artistar Registered Member

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    I don't get it either - by default GRUB recognizes OS on hd0,6, but after restoration i always have to point it to hd0,3. Every other solution is giving me an error message, sth. like "this partition doesn't exist".... What i wrote earlier is correct. Even now, on current Debian system, the situation is the same as before.
    What can i say, i'm totally lost on this matter.
    But the funniest thing is that Ubuntu's working properly every single time after restoration and pointing on hd0,3. That's why i'm pretty sure that the problem is not im TI, but somewhere in GRUB or Debian itself....
    But big thank you for your effort though. :)
     
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