True Image Backup identical to Clone Drive?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by envoyce, Mar 28, 2009.

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  1. envoyce

    envoyce Registered Member

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    Hello,

    i would like to know, if a Backup from True Image (.tib or whatever the backup files are named) is identical to a cloned drive.

    I just ask, since i wonder how True Image can backup parts of the harddrive that aren't accessible normally (like the "System Volume Information" folder etc.).


    thanks!
     
  2. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    The Backup (.tib file) has to undergo a Recovery process to a drive for it to be like a cloned drive. In other words, if you clone your system drive, the clone will be immediately bootable just like the system drive. But if you make a Backup of the system drive, you have to use the Restore feature (Recovery) to transform that .tib file onto a drive before it will be like the system drive.
     
  3. envoyce

    envoyce Registered Member

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    thank you for your answer, but what i really ment was:

    Is the content of the .tib file (full backup) 100% identical to the source?

    I was just wondering, how True Image could do a 100% identical backup file right out of a running windows, where i thought certain areas would be even read-protected.
     
  4. MrMorse

    MrMorse Registered Member

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    hi envoyce,

    you have to distinguish between:
    a) cloning a disk
    b) fullbackup using the bootable rescue-cd
    c) fullbackup under a running Windows

    (what I write here is MY knowledge; all correctons are welcome :) )

    to a):
    The 'cloning' is from one physical disk to another physical disk. It is exactly a mirror. One exception is the internal hdd-id. This is different because it depends on the hardware (firmware, manufacturer features).

    to b):
    This backup contents all data from the (used) sectors. It is not a 1to1 mirror. Some special files will not be saved (e.g. pagefile.sys, hibernate.sys)
    These passed files will be re-allocate when you start Windows the first time after restore.
    (To the members here: please correct me if I have been mistaken!)

    to c):
    When you invoke a fullbackup under Windows, Ti makes a 'snapshot' of the current state. This is the base for the fullbackup.
    For clarification: You make a fullbackup under Windows. After seconds, the Windows looks already different to your backup: because malware-scanner, indexing, defrag, etc, etc).
    BTW: I don't dare a fullbackup under Windows. I ALWAYS use the rescue-cd...

    Concerning point c):
    I only have done it once for evaluating Ti. May be that my explanation is not 100% correct.
     
  5. drosenth

    drosenth Registered Member

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    Greetings,

    I would be interested if others see a need to do a backup (tib) from the boot CD or if they have have 100% performing it from Windows. I am fairly new to the product and I am doing full backups from windows and want to make sure it is a "good" copy". I totally agree with your logic, but hate to take the extra time to run it from a boot cd if it isn't necessary. I am running the latest version of Home TI 2009.

    Thanks in advance,
    Dave

    PS - I have used the clone option mulitple times to increase my boot disk size and it is outstanding!
     
  6. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    You will have a mix of both points of view. Some do not even have it installed and perform all backups from the Rescue CD. This question has been asked and answered multiple times. Remember, the Rescue CD plays a very important role. If you want to restore your system partition or restore to a new disk, it is best done when booted from the Rescue CD. You need to have tested your intended recovery procedures so you have no surprises at time of need. It is prudent to validate some of your Windows archives when booted from the Rescue CD and likewise, some of your archives created via the Rescue CD should also be validated. A real restoration of your archives is the only true test. You will be unable to clone if the master disk is not bootable. Take the time now to prove your recovery procedures.

    Check out some of the postings by Xpilot where he describes his backup procedures. I think you will find them helpful and informative. Below is 2 such links but he has others which are even more explanatory.

    Post #7
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=1414684&postcount=7

    Post #$221
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=1272558&postcount=221
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2009
  7. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Yes, as Grover said you'll get reasons for doing it both ways. I do both Backups and Restores only from the cd. You never know when an update, for whichever software it is, be it your antivirus, or a Windows update or some other, refuses to play nice with True Image. So as the saying goes, I rather be safe than sorry. :) :)
     
  8. drosenth

    drosenth Registered Member

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    Thanks for the quick response (both of you). I too believe in testing my backups, but I just don't have a great way to test a bare metal restore on my laptop. BUT, the point is well taken - if that is how I plan to use my restore then use the CD to ensure as high of probability of success as possible.

    Thanks again,
    DaveR
     
  9. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Because it's a laptop, don't dismiss doing an actual restore. For the majority of laptops, replacing a drive is easier than doing so on a desktop. And laptop drives are relatively low in price now and getting lower (wish car prices were like that :D ) . You will also need an external drive to hold the Backup Image. These drives are even lower per Gb than notebook drives.
     
  10. jonyjoe81

    jonyjoe81 Registered Member

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    I only do image backups (never do clones) from within windows, I have had a 100% success rate doing it that way. Never had a corrupt image yet. Every drive that I restored look and acted like the source drive that I backed up, if there where any differences I wasn't able to notice them.

    On the newer versions of true image there are some settings that you might have to modify (for instance make sure the temp files are backed up, otherwise some programs won't work properly on the restored drive).

    You might also want to read up on "chs geometry" problems when restoring laptops. On those situations the new drive has to be in the laptop when you restore it. Always plan for the worst.
     
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