TI-10 Can I do this?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by BillyClub, Mar 15, 2008.

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  1. BillyClub

    BillyClub Registered Member

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    Wife has a laptop with a small HD (40G). It was partitioned in the past with 5 partitions. (Dont ask, it's what she wanted). In the last couple of days I figured out what was wrong with a program that would not work for her and decided to change some of the partition sizes around.
    Right now the C (Boot Drive) is 4G. The D (Utility) is also 4G. The E is 14G, F is 14G and drive G is the rest.
    I'd like to change C to 5G, D to 5G, add to E and subtract from F and get rid of G altogether.
    Basically the best way to go might be to completely wipe the drive and start over. Can TI do thiso_O
    I've made seperate images of the C, D, E, and F. I never Imaged one of G as it's completely empty. Also made a single image of C+D+E+F altogether.
    Can this be done, if not just wondering if I could go into Computer Management, Storage, Disk Management(local). Then start from the end and format then delete logical drives until I get to C. So I'd end up with C and the rest unallocated space then use TI to reinstall C with an additional 1G from the unallocated space. And then continue on from there??
    Thought I'd ask B4 I screw up.... Thanks!!
     
  2. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Rather than experiment with the existing laptop drive, I would get another, larger, say a 60 gig, drive and do the restore to it. I believe TI will automatically expand the partitions proportionally. The expense of the other drive will be worth the peace of mind and afterwards you can always put the unused drive in an enclosure to use as an external drive.

    Where do you have the present backup images?
     
  3. BillyClub

    BillyClub Registered Member

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    Hi: Getting another HD isn't in the cards right now. Seeing that the wife is comfortable with what she's got right now we'll keep using it until it blows. As of now it's used on the internet for her half dozen or so daily crossword puzzles and emails between friends and family. That along with a couple dozen small Real Arcade and Reflexive games is all she uses it for.
    When we first decided on the size of the partitions it worked OK until Microsoft started with the updates every week or so. Then when she\we retired we had no more use for a couple of the partitions and think they could be put to better use added to another.
    The Images right now are on an external 500G that also contains images from my desktop and another laptop along with quite a few movie rips.
    Thanks 4 reading..........
     
  4. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    In that case then be sure to save any personal files, emails, etc before you attempt the change. I believe it can be done the way you describe - wipe the drive, create the partitions in the sizes you want, then restore the individual partitions from the backup, using the bootable True Image Rescue CD. But I've never tried anything like this.

    Good luck with it ... let us know how it turns out.
     
  5. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    I agree with DwnNDirty that this should work fine.

    OK, to play safe or if you haven't restored the C partition before on this machine, put some junk on drive G. Make an image of drive G and restore it using the True ImageRecovery CD. If that works, there's no reason why you won't be able to restore all the other partitions from a backup image. If you can't restore from the Recovery CD, you won't be able to restore the C partition.

    It shouldn't matter whether you restore from a single backup of the entire hard drive or from individual backups of C, D, E and F. You might want to make a new backup immediately before doing the restore so that no new emails or other items are lost.

    As DwnNDirty suggested, I'd also make a simple copy of any extremely important personal files just as a precaution.

    If I were doing it, I'd use your second approach and delete G, F, E and D in Disk Management. Then I'd restore C and increase it's size. Follow that with the other partitions in order and adjust their sizes as you restore each one.

    Let us know how it goes.
     
  6. uptone

    uptone Registered Member

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    You can re-do your partitions howerver if you are a Novice, it is not reccommend unless you have a program that will do it for you without a hassel and without messing anything up. I have used Nortons Partition Magic to do what you wish to do and it works great even for a novice. Acronis was not designed to do this. Just a suggestion.
     
  7. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Yes, but TI will do it just fine with the procedure that BillyClub suggested. It is no more difficult than restoring the backups to a new drive.
     
  8. BillyClub

    BillyClub Registered Member

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    Update: Tried doing as JMK suggested, garbage on G, made image of G,
    formatted G then inserted CD and restarted.
    After CD started I started from the Safe mode and it did not recognize the external HD. Restarted and then started TI with full mode, External was recognized (although all the partition letters were screwed up) and was able to restore drive G. After restart all looks good for a final try tomorrow.
    Wife won't be home which means she won't have to put up with me when or if things go wrong......Thanks to all
     
  9. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    That's good news.

    The Linux OS of the Recovery CD sometimes lists the partitions with different letters. That's one very good reason to give each partition a name. Use the names instead of the letters to be sure you are doing what you want.

    I call my partitions Boot, Data and Backup for example, but you can call them Alice, Fido and Germaine if you prefer. :)

    Good luck tomorrow.
     
  10. BillyClub

    BillyClub Registered Member

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    Want to thank both of you gents....It went as smooth as butter.
    All partitions are the sizes I was envisioning...Most of the time that it took was due to me making Images of the 4 partitions and after resizing them I redid the images... I had the right idea in the first place I just needed a couple of cheerleaders and you guys fit the bill.
    Again my heartfelt THANKS!!!
     
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