There Are Only 30,000 Websites on the Dark Web

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Minimalist, Apr 8, 2016.

  1. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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  2. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    How would they "shutdown" such web? o_O
     
  3. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    I am going to venture a guess that almost all of that 71 percent spend virtually no time on the DW, and they are therefore casting a ballot based upon what they have "heard" and not experienced.

    Being able to conduct private communication and commerce is a major plus for me. Like all tools, misuse can be employed but that doesn't mean the tool is not also able to provide good to those who use it properly. e.g. - we can take all hammers away from carpenters and not allow them to build things, and why, because someone else beat a person to death with a hammer! Blaming the tool is myopic, but it allows simplistic political aspirations to proceed.
     
  4. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Nothing that could be shut down deserves to survive ;)
     
  5. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    So if I understood you correctly, the Dark Web cannot be shut down?
     
  6. Joxx

    Joxx Registered Member

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    that was beautiful :)
    let's start with Central Banks
     
  7. ssbtech

    ssbtech Registered Member

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    And 100% of those 71% probably think that Dihydrogen Monoxide should be banned.
     
  8. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    It could be shut down. But it wouldn't be easy. Tor onion services don't require exit relays, which are the hardest to host, and the easiest to block. From an ISP perspective, onion services look a lot like clients. They connect through entry guards, so ISPs and other local observers just see those encrypted connections.

    In order to take down onion services, adversaries would need to take down the Tor network. Or compromise the Tor Project, and push changes in tor that disabled onion services.

    And if that happened, there's a huge activist base that would shift to something better. Even with total global censorship, traffic could move to covert channels, hidden in streaming HD video ;)
     
  9. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    @mirimir - covert channels hidden in streaming HD are not necessarily that covert. This is because of the nature of the compression used, analogous to the detection of steganography in images. Basically, the covert changes result in artifacts in the image/video that "shouldn't" be there had it run through a codec. At least, you'd have to be quite sophisticated about how you inserted the messages and then encoded them, and then recovered the message reliably.
     
  10. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    You can use packet timing. There's less bandwidth than with steganography using optional bits in the data. But there's no actual alternation of content.
     
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