The Dangers of a Mandatory DNA Database

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by mood, Feb 22, 2019.

  1. mood

    mood Updates Team

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    The Dangers of a Mandatory DNA Database
    February 22, 2019
    https://www.nextgov.com/ideas/2019/02/dangers-mandatory-dna-database/155028/
     
  2. kls490

    kls490 Registered Member

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    That's a VERY scary article, mood. You can bet if that bill manages to become law in Arizona, it is just a matter of time before some lawmaker in another state, or even someone at the Federal-level will be attempting to do the same thing, and it won't be limited to just one small segment of the population either! :blink:

    People in this country had better wake up...before they find themselves without ANY privacy rights at all!
     
  3. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Mandatory or not, DNA databases (be they commercial or governmental) will totally transform privacy in meatspace. Even if your DNA isn't in the database, with enough relatives represented, you can be linked (as child of foo, sibling of bar, etc). So good OPSEC for meatspace will include leaving no DNA.
     
  4. Floyd 57

    Floyd 57 Registered Member

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    When you say it like that, all I can think about is objects :D

    They still don't have your DNA tho, what are u trying to say?
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    In the case I'm considering, they do have your DNA. From a crime scene, or whatever. But they don't know who you are.

    My point is that they can figure out who you are, even if your DNA isn't in any database that they can access.

    Current DNA tests don't actually involve total DNA sequencing. They're just looking at a bunch of sequences that are relatively unique. But they're shared in family lines. So if anyone in your family tree is in databases that they can access, they can determine who you're related to. And the more relatives there are in those databases, the more accurately they can do that.

    And even if we're talking about total DNA sequences, it's still doable. It'd just take lots more computation.
     
  6. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    The unfortunate thing is that Genealogy companies have millions and millions of folks sending samples in out of curiosity about the heritage. Sounds good on paper but then databases are created and as Mirimir stated family members end up indentifying other members by default. For a major crime such as the BTK killer in the USA things like this seem to be concluding cases more every day. I won't fight you on whether or not that is a good thing. But lets say "big brother" now wants to find you for ANY reason. They go to the genealogy companies and soon they will find you. I don't like that part of it!
     
  7. Socio

    Socio Registered Member

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    Here is a related article:

    China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/21/business/china-xinjiang-uighur-dna-thermo-fisher.html

    This is just around the corner for the Western World, the bigger government gets, the more control in garners, the more it wants to and needs to protect itself from it's own populace.
     
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