Thales Wins First UK ID Card Contract

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by dw426, Aug 4, 2008.

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  1. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    From the article: "IPS is scheduled to start issuing biometric ID cards to foreign nationals this year. By late next year, ID cards will be issued to so-called critical workers, such as those employed at airports and other security-related jobs. In 2010, the cards will be issued to those who request them, with a mass issuance starting around 2011 or 2012.

    The program, which was fiercely opposed by privacy activists and those concerned about security, will be compulsory for those over 16 years old. Those applying for a new passport or renewing one will be issued an ID card."

    http://www.pcworld.com/businesscent...irst_uk_id_card_contract_worth_and16318m.html

    Oh boy, sorry UK'ers :ouch:
     
  2. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    Well, the U.S. is on its way, with something similar to a National ID card, with this introduction: The U.S. Passport Card Is Now In Production!.

    And with this statement "the passport card contains a vicinity-read radio frequency identification (RFID) chip" be careful when going shopping, a store's detector could go a little crazy on you!
     
  3. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Yeah, the RFID tech is a pet project here in the U.S and they've been wanting that passport card for ages. When the UK and the U.S implement this kind of stuff, you can be sure other countries will follow suit eventually.
     
  4. KookyMan

    KookyMan Registered Member

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    The passport card, from my understanding, is no different than the standard Passport though. The only difference is it can be used on land travel from US<->Canada/Carribbean/Mexico, where as the passport can be used for Land/Air travel everywhere. The Passport card is stupid, it costs nearly as much as a passport and is less useful.

    As for the RFID, US Passports have had them embedded for at least a year now, I think 2 or more optionally.
     
  5. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    Yes, the Card "carries the rights and privileges of the U.S. passport book and is adjudicated to the exact same standards" according to the State site.

    If your only travel to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda from the US, is by land or sea, the Passport Card is less than half of the cost of a Passport Book: Passport Fees.

    The caveat here is that the Card is no good for Air Travel so you might as well obtain a full Passport and be done with it!
     
  6. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    The point I was trying to make is that this whole system is yet another database of your most personal information that is at risk for a major breach. And here's something that may bother you if nothing else about the program the U.S is trying to implement: One of the ways they saved money (and money is one of the sole reasons this program has been rejected and postponed by states thus far), is that the Dept of Homeland Security has decided NOT to encrypt the data contained on the cards. It'll be a required card that contains everything about you, and yet there will be no encryption of that data...now do I have the attention of the class?

    This program in the U.S was to start May of this year. However, due to states rejecting it because of expense and implementation disagreements, it is scheduled to be put in place in 2017, which will mean billions more spent, all coming out of taxpayers pockets. Also, this is not just about a passport. DHS can implement whatever tech they want in them, RFID tracking, DNA data, the list could go on. And, even though it may remain voluntary, if it is rejected, there is a POSSIBILITY that not having these cards would make you a "non-citizen" to the databases, disabling your ability to fly, take trains, among other things.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2008
  7. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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