Symantec to buy VeriSign's security business

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by ronjor, May 19, 2010.

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  1. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Article
     
  2. funkydude

    funkydude Registered Member

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    Symantec turning into McAfee. Just swallowing away companies.
     
  3. SafetyFirst

    SafetyFirst Registered Member

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    All privacy technology (PGP, GuardianEdge, VeriSign, SSL, PKI) in the hands of one boss - Symantec.

    Big Brother? :cautious:
     
  4. SafetyFirst

    SafetyFirst Registered Member

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    What happened to that Snowdrift's post? :doubt: Where is Snowdrift? :blink: What happened to Snowdrift? :gack: Am I the next? :blink: There's someone at my door! :ninja: PLEASE, CAN YOU...
     
  5. SafetyFirst

    SafetyFirst Registered Member

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    ...

    (creepy silence)
     
  6. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    :cool: :cool: :cool:
     
  7. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Thankfully, we don't have to rely on the proprietary PGP. Now there is something called the OpenPGP standard, which open-source PGP clones use for interoperability. Therefore, none of us are locked into the proprietary PGP software anymore. In fact, it is probably safer not to use PGP (for reasons you stated); instead one should opt for GnuPG (or GPG4Win if you use Windows).

    Of course, I am not going to jump the gun and say this Symantec takeover is a conspiracy; it will depend on how Symantec handles it. If they suddenly close the source-code to PGP, then you should be very weary. Encryption software, by its very nature, must be open-source and peer reviewed to ensure integrity. Otherwise who is to say they haven't given NSA a master key, much like it is suspected M$ did with Windows' crypto library back in the day.
     
  8. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    I may be mistaken, but there seems to be an implication that PGP is less “safe” than GPG4Win. The assertion is surprising (and, I would argue, untrue), because “proprietary PGP” is in fact the original creator of the OpenPGP standard. Additionally, “PGP product source code is downloaded at least 300 times each week, allowing anyone interested in reviewing it to do so” (see here).

    Time will tell, but I would be exceedingly surprised if Symantec altered PGP’s long-standing policy of transparency, since doing so would diminish the value of the PGP brand in the marketplace, in my opinion.
     
  9. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    An alternative (and positive) way to view these highly strategic acquisitions by Symantec is that end-user privacy may be enhanced through improved integration of these technologies.
     
  10. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    To elaborate, here is an excerpt from a recent article explaining the synergy Symantec may potentially achieve from its acquisition of PGP and VeriSign -- and, the substantial benefits that may accrue to users...

     
  11. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    More information on Symantec’s possible plans, from Francis deSouza (senior vice president of the Enterprise Security Group at Symantec):

     
  12. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    The deal is done...

     
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