Solid-state drives lose data if left without power for just a few days

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Minimalist, May 10, 2015.

  1. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

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    Indeed dude! Is hilarious :argh: :argh: :argh:

    A jedec member released an article, about jedec standards, signed not as a Jedec chairman but as a seagate chairman, at a time when seagate did not produce any ssd or solid memory based drives, about how the standards will/should be made but never gave any results of those tests.

    A blogger/journalist took that article years later, when still no results where posted and came to the conclusion that ssds can potentially lose their data in just a few days. People like you, debated over the non existed data/results for weeks...

    And when the seagate chairman (that now produces ssds) explained that the non existed/released data was misinterpreted and states the ssds extreme reliability based not in the original jedec testbed and its results, that were never released, but instead points to other sources/tests, then the same people that debated for weeks changed their mind, based on his explanation for the misinterpretation of something that did not exist in the first place (= the results of those tests). :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Panagiotis
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    What is JEDEC?
    No. You are wrong and you have offered zero evidence to suggest otherwise!

    You refuse to pull your head out of... ...the sand and look at the facts right in front of your own face and accept that JESD218 is a JEDEC document released by JEDEC under the JEDEC banner on the JEDEC website used to "Define JEDEC requirements for SSDs". Therefore I refuse to waste any more of the reader's time or my time discussing this with you.
     
  3. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

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    Thank goodness.:thumb:
    Yes, please stop wasting everyone's time with your constant misinterpretations and blubbering.

    Cox's statement http://www.pcworld.com/article/2925...nt-lose-data-if-left-unplugged-after-all.html
    comes in total contradiction with his Jedec article, with all the Jedec standards about memory storage and is pure marketing to offer a piece of mind to consumers.

    Panagiotis
     
  4. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

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    I did not read the whole articles, but I never heard of anyone lose data on their SSD just because of not powering their computers on for a few days/weeks/months. Granted, SSDs are not made for archiving storage purposes, but it would not lose data in a few days either.
     
  5. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

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    It all depends on the erase cycles of their memory cells.
    For understanding better what to expect (depends really on how you use your drive) read the following
    http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~vm9u/files/RefreshSSDs.pdf
    http://www.macronix.com/Lists/ApplicationNote/Attachments/750/AN0291V2-ProgramErase Cycling Endurance and Data Retention in NOR Flash Memories.pdf
    http://www.macronix.com/Lists/Appli...9V1-Endurance and Retention of NAND Flash.pdf
    For consumers only one advice is really needed; "Do not use your old weared off ssd for archiving purposes". Problem solved!

    Panagiotis
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  6. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

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    Thanks
     
  7. kronckew

    kronckew Registered Member

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    Location:
    CSA Consulate, Glos., UK
    why not try vellum? an information archival technology that lasts for millenia under reasonable storage and handling conditions.actual energy consumption is nil. boot up time is almost instant and random access times are equally good. sequential access will depend on the reading devices assimilation times. some 'readers' are quicker than others. this is generally measured by a test called IQ. copying and backup can be speeded by appropriate technology, generally called a 'printing press', tho subject to initial errors when the information flows thru a 'reader' device into the 'typesetting' device, tho thereafter almost perfect HD copies can be made.

    here's one produced earlier:

    http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s231/kronckew/kells.jpg

    downloaded to vellum in 800a.d. & still going strong. a wonderful low environmental impact storage solution. you can add pages and pages of high definition information almost indefinitely, depending on your room size. you can break it down into sections called 'volumes' or even further into 'chapters' and 'verses'.

    i think i'll patent it and call it something simple.

    how about a 'book'?

    they could be kept online in managed data centres called, more simply 'bookerys' or maybe i'll use the latin for class and call them 'libraries'.


    vegans should look away NOW.

    i further predict a rise in the stocks of cattle farmers in the world. byproducts of vellum production include the world famous 'big mac'.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  8. pandlouk

    pandlouk Registered Member

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    You are welcome. :)

    Panagiotis
     
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