should I change my fw router ?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by blacknight, Aug 9, 2011.

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  1. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    I use a fw router from 2007 - not wireless connection -, his last firmware upgrade is dated 2009. Should I purchase a latest version ? I mean: latest versions of fw routers have significant improvements in the fw isp software ?
     
  2. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    Hello!

    No need to buy a new one I think.

    Have you checked the Router manufacturer website for firmware updates?

    Can you say what Brand and Model is it?
     
  3. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    I updated the firmware two years ago, no new upgrade since in the producer site. New models, especially for wireless connection, that I don't use.
     
  4. ruinebabine

    ruinebabine Registered Member

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  5. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Routers are actually fairly low-tech devices and have worked with the same protocols for many years. Those updates are typically used to correct a problem, not add new security features. Using a router at all provides a HUGE and SIGNIFICANT security advantage and layer of protection over your network so pat yourself on the back just for having a router. All networks should be behind a router, even if a network of just one computer.

    Bottom line, if it is working, don't $%^& with it! Just keep your computers updated and patched, use a current anti-malware solution, and use a software based firewall too - then don't be click-happy with unsolicited popups, emails, downloads, and other links.
     
  6. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

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  7. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    Thanks for all your answer. Particulary: Bill_Bright, so I thought, my thread was looking for confirm, as you gave to me. Obviously, I anyway keep a multi layer defense. - TheKid7, nice, really. But I'm european, not a good moment to spend now :(
     
  8. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Having been on the hunt recently for a new router, and then trying out some linux router distros on an old machine, my observations would be thus:

    A consumer router (dlink/linksys/belkin/etc) provide an EASY solution to routing. Not fussy and "just work". As long as there aren't bugs etc, a new router may not even be needed, unless you want new features or a router with more options. Perhaps too you want to get wireless if you don't have it, or want N over G, things like that. It could be too that your router has poor range on wifi and a different router has better range. Maybe you want a router that is gigabit instead of 10/100.

    If you are into gaming, some of the routers (dlink gamers lounge) are supposed to be better. I had one of those, and I would say it was a better experience, but what it offered for non gamers wouldn't be worth the money.

    I have been reading about how a consumer router is pretty small hardware wise, and how a linux router based off an old PC performs better. Having tried a number of them now, I would have to agree with that, they do perform better. For myself, I found the difference quite noticable. I used a 667mhz celeron and a 1.5ghz P4, both with plenty of RAM and good hdds. I used Intel PRO S NICs, which I have read if you don't use Intel NICs then you won't get maximum performance.

    However, using a linux box as a router isn't the best solution for everyone. I decided not to use one at work but will stick with my Dlink. I just don't need the extra complication. But at home, I am currently using pfSense, and it is working very nice.

    I would say that if you are looking to change your router, you should (and you might have already) examine what you currently have in way of features, and base your purchase decision off of what "new features" you might want. Then examine the options to find the product that gives you all you want. If you don't really need anything other than wifi access and are happy with your current routers features, maybe an AP is all you need.

    I have had or worked on a good number of routers. Some work fine, others you can tell are a little bit flaky or in general not as good. IMO if a router is OK performance wise, it is more the firmware/OS of the router that makes the deal for me.

    Sul.
     
  9. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Virtually any wired (Ethernet) router is vastly more secure than any so called "wireless" router. Why? There's no wireless! There is NO possibility a nosy neighbor, or badguy down the street with a directional antenna can even know you have computers in your house with Ethernet only, unless you tell or show them.

    Yes, wireless networks are easy to secure, but they (radio waves) cannot be hidden. And the human, always the weakest link, plays a HUGE role in securing a wireless network and that is a HUGE vulnerability - compared to Ethernet only.

    If you have multiple computers in your home and they share information, then no doubt a 1Gbit router will provide better performance for your network. But on the Internet side, that's all dependent on your ISP connection, and no where near 100, and in most cases, less than 10Mb/s.

    So if you only have a couple computers on your network, getting a new router just to get 1Gb Ethernet is not worth it because your Internet access will be your bottleneck, not your network. But if you need a new router, since most new computers and motherboards support 1Gb Ethernet, it makes sense to get a router that supports it too - but it can still be basic 10/100/1000 router.

    Routers claiming to be gaming routers do nothing special for "gaming", other than having an internal menu system that caters to the needs of folks who game over networks and the Internet.

    When I mentioned "so-called wireless routers", that's because there is no such thing as a "wireless router". That is a marketing term only. A typical "wireless router" is really 3 totally discrete network devices that just happen to be housed in the same box and just happen to use the same power supply. But just as your sound card and maybe your graphics card are integrated on your motherboard, the router, WAP (wireless access point), and typically a 4-port Ethernet switch are integrated into the same "mainboard" of the "wireless router".

    Badguys go for the easy pickings. They just don't linger if they cannot make almost instant headway in hacking your network or computers. Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) is a great security feature of many more advanced routers and I have no hesitation recommending a router with SPI over a basic router. BUT - they cost more and the level of protection with SPI over a simple basic router without SPI is minuscule - compared to no router at all.
     
  10. blacknight

    blacknight Registered Member

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    Thanks Sully for your elaborated answer. May be I was not clear: I've not a problem fw router-wireless connection, simply I don't use wireless. My question was about fw routers security features: that is, if in the last year fw routers had relevant improvement about security or not.
     
  11. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    The right answer to that I think, is that it might differ from brand to brand, model to model etc...But in the last year alone I would say No, no big changes.
     
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