Shall I disable my pagefile if I have an SSD + 16 GB RAM?

Discussion in 'polls' started by berryracer, May 26, 2012.

?

Shall I disable the pagefile with my setup?

  1. Yes d00d, you have way too much RAM + an SSD!

    33.3%
  2. No, keep it as it is, 1024 min/max

    59.0%
  3. No, set it to....... (please mention in the thread)

    7.7%
  1. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    I would just leave it in default . . .
    There is a higher risk of running into problems by removing it than by leaving it in default. :D
     
  2. PJC

    PJC Very Frequent Poster

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    Disambling PageFile? o_O
    With 16GB RAM? o_O

    Are you kidding me? :eek:
     
  3. Wild Hunter

    Wild Hunter Former Poster

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  4. berryracer

    berryracer Suspended Member

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    never had one for 4 years of doing this ;) since Vista
     
  5. jo3blac1

    jo3blac1 Registered Member

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    makes me wonder if having pagefile is a myth now:rolleyes:
     
  6. berryracer

    berryracer Suspended Member

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    Disable it for a day and see if you run into any problems

    Chances are, you will only get higher performance since the kernel files will never be loaded into Virtual Memory and will always be in the RAM
     
  7. jo3blac1

    jo3blac1 Registered Member

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    I have my pagefile disabled for 5 years or more. Never ran into any problems. That's why I am saying that the requirement to have pagefile on may have been true for older applications back in the 90s and early 2000s. I think this is no longer a case. I know there are a lot of cautious people around here but is there any evidence that any of the current applications require page file? If so I would like to know which ones...
     
  8. guest

    guest Guest

    I don't use a page file at all
    everything is done in ram, where it belongso_O
     

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  9. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    I don't use one. I have 8GB of RAM and haven't run into an OOM once in my life. A lot of programs will page when they don't need to, which isn't really a big deal at all, but... why let them? Besides, on an SSD I need every GB I can get.
     
  10. jo3blac1

    jo3blac1 Registered Member

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    AS far as I remember, some programs use to crash without page file. But that was long time ago...
     
  11. berryracer

    berryracer Suspended Member

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    yeah maybe in 2001, LOL
     
  12. Depends on the OS and system settings.

    On Windows, AFAIK, memory allocations will fail when there is no memory left. Some programs will not be able to handle that and will crash, others may attempt to exit more or less gracefully.

    Likewise on BSD and probably most other UNIXes.

    On Linux, there are as usual a bunch of settings:
    vm.overcommit_memory
    vm.overcommit_ratio
    vm.oom_kill_allocating_task

    - The default setting for overcommit_memory is 0, which does not mean "never overcommit," but rather "sometimes overcommit and sometimes don't depending on circumstances." 1 means "always make memory allocations succeed no matter what," and 2 paradoxically means "make allocations fail once the equivalent of all swap space and X percent of RAM are allocated."

    - The "X percent of RAM" above is overcommit_ratio, which is 50 by default. Remember, the amount of space allocated (not necessarily actually used) before memory allocations start failing with vm.overcommit_memory=2 is overcommit_ratio plus all swap space.

    - oom_kill_allocating_task pertains instead to the OOM killer, which is what normally kicks in when all memory and swap are used up. Normally the OOM killer normally tries to guess what programs are being hogs, and kill those; in practice this often kills essential processes and results in a reboot being necessary. With oom_kill_allocating_task set to 1, the killer will skip the guesswork, and only kill tasks which themselves triggered OOM errors.

    I would hazard a guess that, if you want any kind of predictable behavior on Linux with swap disabled, you should set vm.overcommit_ratio=100 and vm.overcommit_memory=2. But that is just a guess on my part. Don't assume Linux will run reliably with such settings; I haven't been able to test them at all!

    *ahem*

    Anyway, if you're using Windows, just be aware that there is a possibility that some essential program, somewhere in its code, does not correctly handle a memory allocation failing. In which case, if you run out of memory, said program will probably crash and lose all unsaved data.

    Your OS (probably) won't crash, though, unless you're running Linux with default settings.
     
  13. Rainwalker

    Rainwalker Registered Member

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    I have 8GB. With pagefile off things are snappier, but when gaming I see lock up. See post #18.
     
  14. jo3blac1

    jo3blac1 Registered Member

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    Hmmm this explains a lot. So basically for people that don't do anything RAM intensive on their computer, no page file is required. For those that have </=8GB of ram and do intensive computing that's when problems occur.
     
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