Separating data to D: drive not needed any more, paragon EXCLUSION parameters GREAT !

Discussion in 'Paragon Drive Backup Product Line' started by aoz, Dec 18, 2012.

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  1. aoz

    aoz Registered Member

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    i used to do system configurations, with c: drive, for programs exclusively, and d: for data.
    that way, if operations screwed up the c: drive, the d: drive would still be intact.
    Also, could do a backup of the c: drive, in a small footprint, and do a restore of that image in case of disaster.

    I've been doing computer work for 30+ years, and it's never too late to learn new tricks.

    I got a new SSD drive. This time, I made a full c: partition, with all info on it. I thought I'd experiment.

    I used Paragon HD suite 12, and did a backup of c:, and used the EXCLUDE criteria to exclude the whole folder of
    c:\Data-files\ (this contains gigabytes of my data)

    I then restored this to a separate drive. It worked, created a full bootable drive. I did not know (duhh...) that the exclude criteria would allow creation of the full bootable image, minus the giant data directory !!
    now I can have the small footprint image file, and still keep everything on c: !

    for the c:\Data-files\, i actually do daily backups of that, to an external 2.5 inch drive (s), synchronized with syncovery software (allows cloning of folders, etc), so that in event of failure, i could just plug that back in and use files directly or just restore them to the c:\data-files\ folders

    anyway, just thought i'd post my experiences with the exclude criteria, and their usefullness

    nick
     
  2. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Good trick. Paragon has a Migrate to SSD program for about $20 that does essentially the same thing but as you found out, you can do it with existing software.

    When I installed a SSD I already had my C (OS and Apps) separate from my data drive so it was easy. My reasons for the separate C are the same as yours and I also backup the data files with a syncing type program which keeps them in their native formats like you do.

    Another inherent advantage of the separate C drive method is you don't really have to back it up all that frequently. Even if the disk fails and you haven't backed up for a few weeks, the worst you may have to do is run updates and perhaps install an application. It is not the same category of disaster as loosing personally created data files which are available nowhere else.
     
  3. aoz

    aoz Registered Member

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    thanks for reply.
    this may change all my future configuratoins.

    advantage of ALL on c:
    1. easy to do an image of c:, and exclude the data drive
    2. less configuration issues

    DISadvantage of all on c:
    1. SSD size; easy to have a small SSD handle the c: stuff, but then not enough room for d: drive and all data, so still need 2nd large drive; needing the drive is not the problem; it is setting up my paths to diferent things; (example, quickbooks on one machine might point to c:, and other machine to d:)

    2. can MAP a subdirectory on c: to the d: drive, but as I've been finding out, there are some permissions issues related to trying to execute EXE or BAT files from the mapped letter (but still can run them from the native letter)

    I'll continue to analyze this, but with PARAGON, (I've ben using this for many years but just started to use the EXCLUDE items), it gives me a whole new way to approach this.

    nick
     
  4. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    My "data drive" is really a mapped drive on a separate PC that is accessible from all other PCs. This like most things is good and bad. The bad is that it needs to be turned on for access but this function could be performed by a NAS type device. Having it turned on in my case isn't a major problems since it also acts as a print server, a PVR sometimes and it also runs the datafile backup program. This is rather a historic arrangement and if I were to set it up today it would likely be different given wireless printers, NAS, etc

    Another thing I have done is when installing very large, rarely changing things like big games, is to install them on a separate partition from C. They can be imaged very infrequently and if everything fails you still have the installation media. A disadvantage is that even installing some apps to say D, they may still make entries on C so I don't recommend this for commonly used applications since it implies keeping things synchronized.
     
  5. aoz

    aoz Registered Member

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    it would be interesting to actually create a reference document on the above ways to set up configurations, with inclusion of the newer technologies.

    as noted above, the old concerns about partitions destroying other partitions, etc, are becoming obsolete since the advent of backup imaging programs such as paragon, and the improvement of their reliability.

    i wish i had more time to contribute detailed articles to the forums, because these forums have helped me tremendously in my computer travels, and I try to provide some threads such as the above, to help others as they evaluate different implementations.

    I am going to invesigate the mapping issues more (so that i can have standalone BAT and EXE files run from chosen maps) (gpedit.msc and IE settings have NOT solved that issue)

    and I do thank you fo ryour feedback in this also

    nick
     
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