Security and Vista

Discussion in 'other anti-malware software' started by Davidpr, Jul 18, 2007.

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  1. Davidpr

    Davidpr Registered Member

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    My daughter is buying a laptop ready to take to uni in September. Most of the ones she is interested in have Vista installed, which is ok. My question is does Vista need an AV and/or other security software? Or is the hype around the OS being more secure true and no additional software is required?

    Best wishes.
     
  2. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    Hello !

    Yes , Vista is definitely much more secure than any previous Windows operating system . It has a lot more security settings intergrated but this doesn't mean it doesn't need antivirus software/anti-spyware software and/or a firewall .

    She can use the integrated Windows Firewall from Microsoft and should buy antivirus/install product.
     
  3. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    Vista is another M$ OS from Mr gates. Never believe hype.

    So she needs an IN/OUT FW, and AV and a ASW PLUS backup to DVD's of all her key documents. Scans and backups should be scheduled daily before shut down. If you go for a suite avoid ZA, I'd consider NIS (ya ya) I know but it is much improved or KAV. Getting her 1 tool might mean she actually uses it.

    Particularly in a university setting she needs physical security for the lap top which is easily stolen along with all her lecture notes and private messages.
    This means a physical lock and NOT walking away and leaving it in class during a coffee break unless the prof locks the room.

    Some new laptops are more rugged in design for travelers so that is the route. Make sure the laptop is psw protected and not given to ANYBODY!

    All this should be done before term1 starts and tested prior to leaving.

    Good luck to you both!
     
  4. tamdam

    tamdam Registered Member

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    depends on how she uses the laptop. Vista's UAC will block pretty much all malware (bar keyloggers) out there, and will continue to do so, but if she just ignores everything and clicks "allow" its pretty useless in effectiveness. In which case an AV + FW would probably be useful. Vista's UAC is probably the most effective free solution but it can also get very annoying. Also, depends on her surfing habits obviously. Get her to use Firefox, be careful what she downloads and Vista's UAC should be more than enough. Otherwise get out the AV + FW or a suite like KIS or NIS.
     
  5. Davidpr

    Davidpr Registered Member

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    Thank you to both of you for your comments. Very useful and I will take your advice on board.

    David.
     
  6. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    You can run a free av such as AVG. Antivir (my choice) or Avast and an antispyware and the windows forewall with advanced security will do just fine as an in and out firewall. If you want you can just use the windowsdefender in Vista as your antispyware in you want. People on this forum even with good intentions have a tendency to go overboard on security apps. I use Antivir Premium and Windows firewall with windows defender and never get infected. And I do surf all over the net excluding porn sites.

    bigc

    P.S.
    Visat's UAC is a great security system but it will not replace an av and antispyware or firewall.
     
  7. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    Hi Big:

    I don't know whether you meant me as one who goes overboard on security apps or not but that's ok :cool:

    I spoke to the OP from expereince inside as an instructor from inside a well known IT technical college who must remain nameless here. The lack of security by students and deliberate acts of id theft was appalling! Some students submitting assignments to me on disks embedded virus's either on purpose or by virtue of their own lack of concern. I had warned them that if the assignment disks were security probelms it would get 0! That ended that problem.

    The students passed corrupt files and email psw back and forth and it is unbelievable what I saw happening there. Maybe it has improved but I doubt it. :'(

    So, I rest my case, out OP's daughter needs to be "trained" to protect herself. I wish her well.
     
  8. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    Well, I just ordered a laptop for my daughter to take to school next month. I noticed the thing has NIS pre-installed with a 60-day subscription so I'm really tempted just to have her stick with that.

    My *main* concern, however, is the *physical security* of the laptop, as Escalader mentioned in a previous post. My son is in his third year at a smaller, private university and has never had a problem. However, my daughter will be attending a *very large* public institution where, ostensibly, laptops disappear on a rather alarmingly frequent basis.

    So, on that note, does anyone have any recommendations for anti-theft solutions? Is, for example, LoJack for Laptops by Computrace effective? Is there something better?

    TIA!
     
  9. tamdam

    tamdam Registered Member

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    truecrypt encryption is a free alternative which makes an encrypted volume. Needs mounting and dismounting though, so might be annoying at times. Also needs her to use FF and thunderbird, because with IE and outlook express its very hard to move profiles. But its very secure without paying a cent :)
     
  10. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    On the NIS just keep that with 1 month to go, the issue will be when the subscription expires she will be at school and with all the distractions may let it slide, and then the AV etc will be obsolete in an hour or less.

    On the physical side locks etc they are as good as the user if she doesn't use the lock or forgets and walks off it is gone anyway. The locks stop petty thieves a real pro will use fence cutters anyway, nothing you can do then.

    Assume it will be stolen now where is the backup for all her notes, assingments etc?
     
  11. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    Thanks!

    Re the NIS subscription, after the laptop arrives, I figure I'll be able to extend the 60 days to one year upon registration.

    The backup issue is not too difficult **provided** she actually uses it. I was planning to get an external USB HDD for that purpose.

    The theft issue is a bit different because, obviously, that results in a major inconvenience and a whopping expense, as well. Further, I can see where the thing could get swiped even if she exercises the utmost care. Hence, my question about an anti-theft solution. Purportedly, some have had success with LoJack but I was curious as to whether those claims are accurate and whether there are any better solutions (such as a GPS locator or something).
     
  12. coolbluewater

    coolbluewater Registered Member

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    As noted, the most important issue is physical security, and even then, you can only hope to deter a thief, or at least slow them down. Any determined thief will get what they came for.
    That said, a Kensington lock will slow down a thief, provided it always goes with the laptop and always gets used. Relying on a Kensington lock while away from the laptop when it's left out in plain sight isn't a good idea. Locking the laptop inside a padlocked locker when not in use would be better. In other words, stay with the laptop, or lock it away.
    The USB drive is a good idea. Just make sure it gets locked away out of sight when not actually in use, and make sure all data files are encrypted on the laptop and on the USB drive.

    Lojack, on the other hand, can be defeated many ways. I won't describe them here, but the O.P. can PM me if interested.
    A GPS solution is costly, and by nature, comes into play after the laptop is missing, which pretty much means it's game over at that point.
     
  13. Tunerz

    Tunerz Registered Member

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    It will be only secure only for a while, and later on it will also succumb to the malware writers.

    It is similar to Microsoft's statement on Windows 200
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_2000
     
  14. TairikuOkami

    TairikuOkami Registered Member

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    The newest version of any software is almost allways the most secure, the problem is, that it also contains more features, which results in more vulnerabilities.
     
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