Secure erasing on SSD

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by JBob555, May 24, 2010.

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  1. JBob555

    JBob555 Registered Member

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    I am switching to a solid state drive and was wondering if anyone knew how secure erasing works on these new drives. I am currently using East-Tec Eraser, but I've read that SSD's only have a certain number of writes in them and was wondered whether using something like East-Tec would shorten the life of my SSD. Thanks for any info.
     
  2. HAN

    HAN Registered Member

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    Depending on what brand of drive you have, they may offer something related to the TRIM command. I have never used one yet and don't know what options may be available...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM
     
  3. JBob555

    JBob555 Registered Member

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    From Wikipedia: "Manufacturers use various techniques in their SSD controllers to spread write operations over the entire flash disk as optimally as possible[17][18]. This is not only to optimize speed by minimizing the need for write amplification, but also in order to increase longivity of the flash cells, since typical MLC flash will last around 10,000 cycles [19] (Wear levelling). Another approach is to implement spare flash memory on the SSD, not reported to the operating system, to provide empty pages to write operations for as long as possible before overwriting already used ones.[20]

    The efficiency of these techniques will depend considerably on the agreement between operating system and SSD controller about which pages can be considered either in use or free space. The traditional approach of most operating systems to not communicate deleted sectors/pages to the storage medium, prevents SSD controllers from optimally tuning their free space management. The TRIM command is meant to remedy this, and enable the SSD controller to execute as much as possible of the necessary overhead ahead of actual write operations to the involved pages, thus increasing the responsiveness.[21][22]

    As the command completely purges the data it affects, typical data recovery is made impossible."

    So according to this if I do a normal delete through windows, and once the TRIM command is executed, data is securely deleted and there is no need for special secure erase software. This sounds great if it is correct. :)
     
  4. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Registered Member

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    The question of whether TRIM actually makes data unrecoverable from a SSD appears to be unanswered...

     
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