Router Problem I think-looking for advice

Discussion in 'hardware' started by roark37, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    Hi,

    I use an old b/g router and have stuck with it as it has been super reliable but I think I have a wifi problem with the router. I ran internet speed tests with my laptop and with wifi I was only getting about .62mbps and I stayed in the low .60's even after testing several times. So then with the same laptop I disconnected wifi network and connected to router using 100 ft ethernet cord(router on another floor) and got around 22mbps with the test. So am I right in assuming it is a problem with the router wifi with that much of a difference? If not what do you think the problem likely is? The signal strength is all solid bars so I don't think the distance or interference has anything to do with it. I have not restarted router yet but I am not sure if that will help at all but does it sound like it is simply time to upgrade router? I am guessing that is the case and I have a new still in the box Cisco Valet N router that was bought several years at a super low price at Black Friday sale that I could try first. But if I install new N router and have problems getting it to work or its defective or for whatever reason it does not work. Then do all I have to do is connect my current b/g router back again and it should still work? Or do I have to go through all the set up again? Thanks.
     
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    802.11g bandwidth maxes out (in theory) at 54Mbps. But theory and real world don't always see eye-to-eye so it is common to get much less - especially as distance increases between the wireless device and the WAP (wireless access point), number of walls/ceilings/floor in between, metal pipes and wires in those wall, other wireless devices, and more.

    Even old 10/100 Ethernet maxes out at 100Mbps with little worries about distance or interference. So you should expect better speeds with Ethernet. Most newer routers and network cards support 1000Mbps (1Gbps) Ethernet networking too for even better local speeds.

    You should definitely see some significant improvement in your local networking speeds with a new 11n (or better yet, even newer 11ac) router. Plus they offer better security too. But note I said local networking. Your speeds to the Internet will still be determined by your ISP.
    You will have to go through the setup to get the new 11n router to work, then again if you switch back. This is for several reasons. For one, the new router will need to assign IPs to your connected devices and they may be different from what currently using. The Ethernet side should be relatively painless. But for the wireless side, you will have to set up your SSID and passphrase too. Not hard, but necessary.
     
  3. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    Thanks Bill. I do realize the new router has to be set up but I did think the old would still work if reconnected back again. I thought that because the cable modem is not changing so I figured the Comcast ip for my address not changing so I thought routers kept the last configuration in their memory. So other than connecting with different passwords to the new router I thought that reconnecting back to the old router would only need passwords maybe entered again. But it sounds like I am wrong as you indicate the old would need entire set up again right? Anyway as long as ethernet works on new router I should be okay even if trouble with wifi. My main concern about this is I work from home 2 days a week so I am trying to anticipate potential trouble and have backup plan just in case.

    But I had planned to upgrade my modem too several months ago and have not got around to it as I have Docsis 2.0 still. But when I did so I was thinking of getting new a/c router at same time and just skip Cisco Valet N that I have even though new in box. But with my current wifi issue I was instead planning to hook up new Cisco router maybe this weekend and see how it works. If it works well there is no reason to think it won't also with Docsis 3.0 modem is there? Then I may keep it as least at first when I get new modem as right now I have no a/c devices so I am not sure I would see major benefit now with a/c. Of course that is assuming Cisco Valet does work well. Lastly I have Comcast and was planning to get Motorola/Arris SB6141 modem when I upgrade. Do you know if any software has to be installed when hooking up new modem? I did not think so as I only thought I had to call Comcast with the new serial/mac numbers so they could key in and then just plug and play or is that not correct? Anyway thanks again.
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    On the Internet side that is true. You should not have to change anything there. But for the wireless side, you will have to setup the routers, then the devices that connect to them.

    You cannot make the assumption your modem upgrade will go well just because the router upgrade does.

    That said, there is no reason the modem upgrade will cause problems. The biggest pain is you will have to call your ISP and tell them you are changing modems as they will need the MAC address for your new modem. Nothing difficult, however.

    I am actually surprised your ISP still supports DOCSIS 2.0 modems. You should see some performance gains there too.

    If me, I would just swap the router and modem all at once. Just make sure you totally remove power from your Ethernet connected computer (unplug from the wall, or flip the power supply's master power switch - if it has one). This will ensure all standby power is removed.

    With all power off (including the new router and new modem) connect PC to an Ethernet port, the router to the modem, then the modem to your cable. Then call your ISP and have the MAC address ready. Be sure to tell them you just swapped modems and all power is currently disconnected and let them walk you through it.

    They should ask you to connect power to the modem and provide the new MAC address. Once they have authenticated the modem, power up the router and wait for the lights to settle down. The router will ten assume the new IP address assigned by your ISP. Then power up the PC.

    Once you know the PC can connect to the Internet via Ethernet, then you can work on getting all your wireless devices connected.
     
  5. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    Does that mean then that the ethernet through the router is just plug and play? Meaning once ISP activates new modem and blinking lights are correct on it then router ethernet will work automatically without setting up anything. And that all set up on router is for wireless only?

    I may go with what you suggest and just do everything at once when I get new modem. It is just that I am a little intimidated by doing both at once as I have never done either on my own before so was trying to keep it fairly simple. But your suggestion makes sense as that way new router only needs to be set up once and it does seem fairly straightforward. And I have been told by many people that it is super easy now but I guess I am hesitant as when I watched someone do it around 10 years ago it was kind of involved.

    Anyway thanks again Bill for your help.
     
  6. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

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    !? Definitely use this! If you aren't going to use it, don't buy it! Power cycle the cable modem any time you connect a new device to it as it affixes to the first MAC address it sees after power-up. Use WPA2 and a strong passphrase, disable WPS and don't hide your SSID; it doesn't make you unhackable, it doesn't hide your SSID, and it causes problems.

    Your old WiFi may just have components degrading in addition to the obscura Bill described. Additionally, it could be RF interference from other devices around the same frequency (cordless phones) or other WiFi APs. Use an app to see what channels aren't being used and use those (routers seem to not work around their neighbours when set to "auto"). Power cycle it, inspect/clean it, experiment with it, keep it as a backup.

    You would only benefit from a DOCSIS 3 modem if your plan gives you more bandwidth than what your DOCSIS 2 modem can handle (~42M down, ~30M up). Since it looks like you have a 20M down plan, you'd be wasting your money.
     
  7. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    No, but almost. In most cases, with NAT/DHCP, you do just plug an Ethernet cable between the computer and one of the router's Ethernet ports, power up the computer and it receives an IP from the router and is good to go. Note this has nothing to do with the ISP. This computer is already part of your LAN and you can already share data between all Ethernet connected computers. Internet access is set via the connection between the router and the modem.

    Ethernet is pretty low tech because it does not have to worry about all the security that's involved with wireless. For someone to hack an Ethernet network, they have to physically connect to your network. And if there was a badguy in your living room connected to your router, you would probably notice.

    For wireless, someone could be a few 100 yards away with a directional antenna and with your passphrase, access your network.

    Let's back up. Understand there is no such thing as a "wireless router"! That is a marketing term for an integrated network device that is really 3 devices in one; a router, a 4-port Ethernet switch, and a WAP (wireless access point). These are 3 discrete devices that just happen to share a circuit board, case and power supply.

    A router has 1 LAN port (on your side) and 1 WAN (or Internet) port and is used to connect (or isolate) two networks. The 4-port (or sometimes 8-port) Ethernet switch is used to connect wired devices to the router's 1 LAN port. The WAP is used to connect wireless devices to an internal 5th (or 9th) Ethernet port.

    Causes problems? Ummm, not really - at least nothing major or lasting. Some devices need to see the SSID during setup to connect the first time. After that SSID broadcasting can be disabled. But with most devices, you just need to know the SSID, not be able to see it.

    That said, I agree completely that hiding it does not increase security as any wannabe whizkid can easily "see" your wireless network whether you broadcast your SSID or not. I do recommend changing the default name to something that is not easily identified as belonging to you to keep nosey neighbors guessing. And of course use a very strong passphrase - and not your dog's name.

    DOCSIS3.0 is not a waste of money. In addition to much higher supported bandwidth, it adds two very important features not supported in DOCSIS2.0, IPv6 and IPTV. And as I noted above, your ISP may require it - if not now, they will in the future. And while immediate speed advantages may not be apparent, DOCSIS3.0 channel bonding capability helps ensure a more robust connection even when the network/Internet (between you and your ISP) is very busy. Note my ISP adapted IPv6 in my area a couple years ago.

    The issue now is, what are you paying for?
     
  8. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

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    This is where, as you said, reality doesn't match the theory. Hidden SSIDs cause drop-outs.

    SSID name is irrelevant (I wouldn't put any PII on it) as any free app or good WiFi drivers will pinpoint any AP location.

    "Supported bandwidth" is irrelevant sales-pitching. The bandwidth you are actually using is the only thing that matters.

    DOCSIS 2 supports IPv6: cf. http://www.cablelabs.com/wp-content/uploads/specdocs/CM-SP-DOCSIS2.0-IPv6-I07-130404.pdf
    Who cares? The Internet doesn't support IPv6 yet. When it comes, skip 3 and get a DOCSIS 4 modem if you haven't switched to fiber already.

    Again, "supported" versus "actually using". Besides, people still watch broadcast TV? Why would anyone do that? o_O

    People think this but it isn't true (been there, done that). Your ISP has to actually give you those channels and they won't unless you have a package (higher cost for greater bandwidth that requires 3.0) that warrants it. Otherwise, you'll still only get one channel. Additionally, if your ISP is congested to the point of your having problems, you open a ticket and have them resolve their issues, not try to work around their issues (which won't work as congestion is on their end, not yours). If that doesn't work, that's what the BBB and FCC are for (been there, done that).

    Don't believe me? Go to Best Buy, et. al. and get a DOCSIS 3.0 modem and try it for two weeks. If it gives you no advantage, return it within the no-questions-asked full-refund period. Beware of the placebo effect and use sound testing methods.
     
  9. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Got a link to anything supporting your claim a hidden SSID causes dropouts? That really does not make any sense as it has nothing to do with connectivity once authorization is granted.

    It is not irrelevant in many situations. For example, in a crowded wireless environment, you cannot pinpoint the physical location of the AP without a decent directional antenna and even then, it only shows the direction, not distance. But if someone knows your name and you name your SSID RoloNetwork, a badguy will know it is yours and then knows you have potentially expensive computer equipment in your house.

    Now if you live out in the boonies and the closest neighbor is 100s of yards away, then no, the name does not matter.
    That matters but so does what you are paying for. And as more and more folks stream with Netflix, etc. that really matters - especially if multiple users in house.
    No it doesn't. Check your link. That is for DOCSIS 2.0 + IPv6. That is a transition device. You cannot simply upgrade a DOCSIS2 device to a DOCSIS2 + IPv6.
    Huh? IPTV in NO way implies broadcast TV. But, perhaps to your amazement, ABC, CBS, and NBC are sent over IPTV too.

    It may not be necessary to run out and immediately replace your DOCSIS2 modem with a DOCSIS3 modem - again, that depends on your ISP and your service contract. As I noted, my ISP requires DOCSIS3 modems in my area and has for nearly 2 years. Just because yours may not, Rolo, do not assume no one needs it.
     
  10. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

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    It's been my experience for many years.
    Oh, and, link? Yes, pretty much the whole Internet: https://www.google.com/search?clien...ses dropouts&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    Honestly, I'm getting tired of your "link it or you're wrong" attitude, Bill.

    It is called, "triangulation"

    He can get my name from the mail in my mailbox if public record wasn't enough. He could also get it from my license plate if he saw me drive off. My SSIDs are is Disaster_Area_A and Disaster_Area_B (kinda goes with the avatar) and, if they were hidden, they could be acquired from the devices polling for the hidden SSID (which exposes it regularly) or with a few minutes with many of the WiFi scanners that discover hidden SSIDs.
    cf. https://www.raymond.cc/blog/how-to-discover-hidden-wireless-network/
    cf. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/2865...hiding-your-wireless-ssid-really-more-secure/

    My wife & I have streamed (concurrently even) Netflix, Amazon Prime, various other HD streams since about 2006 on the same DOCSIS 2 modems (Terayon TJ 715x and Motorola Surfboard 5120 as a backup). We haven't owned a TV or had "cable TV" in a decade. We've only had 12/1 plan which changed to 15/1 plan--the cheapest unmetered plan. Anything more would be a waste of money.

    I never said you could; I pointed out that DOCSIS 2 can support IPv6. Do you know why? It would be in the ISPs interest to deploy it more than the customers'. A level head would respond, "My Internet works just fine; why do I need to buy another modem?"

    I wouldn't know as I don't watch those. I do know those are available without a DOCSIS 3 modem via other means (like, the STB you have to get with broadcast TV anyway).

    Who is your ISP? Neither Time Warner nor Comcast require DOCSIS 3 (even if your plan needs it for the speed) and Charter only requires it for the high-speed plans that exceed 2.0 and they give modems away for free anyway.

    I'm also tired of your putting words in my mouth, Bill. I assumed nothing; I made it clear what requires 3.0 and what does not. Clearly the OP's ISP doesn't require 3.0 since he doesn't have one and he's online.

    The sooner you get comfortable with the idea that not all opinions match yours--and that that is OK--the better off we'll be.
     
  11. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    And I am getting tired of you turning things personal any time anyone does not agree with you.

    Did you bother to read your links? Do you know the difference between dropouts and disconnects? Did you see where this is not a problem with modern Windows?
    Oh come on! Triangulation takes 3 points to work. And how many users have the necessary tools and two receiving devices to then triangulate on a wifi signal. You are using an extreme case to make a point. Even experienced badguys are not going to waste their time on that.

    You always want to turn things into a personal issue - bringing up extreme examples to make your point. I see no point in this.

    You keep contradicting yourself to suit your purpose. You don't know what IPTV is, wonder why anyone would watch broadcast TV, then claim you would not know because you don't watch them. Then when I say because something does not apply to you don't assume it is the same for others, you get tired of me putting words in your mouth - even though you clearly think no one watches broadcast TV - even though it comes across cable and IPTV.

    I give.
     
  12. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    All you have to do is take a signal strength reading from 3 points outside the apartment complex with your smart phone. A 4th point can even get you elevation.
     
  13. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    It has been a long time since I perused DOCSIS related specs/protocols, but I recall reading about security/privacy related improvements between DOCSIS versions. I think DOCSIS 3.0 may have had a couple. I'm fairly sure that one aspect I read about was improved encryption of traffic, and another was improved certificate/signature verification in the context of firmware updates. At least one of those seemed like something that would have to be opted-into via provisioning, so you'd have to check config file/data to know if you are actually benefiting.

    Anyone know the details off the top of their head, and have a moment to summarize?
     
  14. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    It is not that easy. Signal strength can vary minute to minute so even standing in one spot can get you different readings. Smart phones use omnidirectional antennas too. So taking a reading, then running around to the other side of the apartment complex with an omnidirectional antenna is not likely to help in a crowded wifi environment. You really need two people with directional antennas monitoring signal strength at the same time who know what they are looking at. Even with a couple notebooks, omnidirectional antennas, and a program like Xirrus WiFi Inspector, zeroing in on a specific apartment in a large apartment complex is no easy task. And note if you point an omnidirectional antenna at an apartment, you are likely to attract some attention too. BTW, I used to work in one these when I was stationed in England, tracking down unauthorized UHF and VHF transmissions (jammers) during exercises. A lot of fun. But it was more fun doing the jamming while on the Exercise Evaluation Team! :D
    ***

    The multiple channels at the same time (channel bonding) aspect with DOCSIS 3.0 is significant if you have multiple Internet users in your home and/or you stream video services while using the Internet for other tasks. If your Internet service plan calls for 30Mbps or less download speeds, and it is just you in the home, DOCSIS 2.0 is probably fine - for now - assuming your ISP does not require 3.0.

    As for DOCSIS security, good point. DOCSIS3.0 also supports AES encryption as you noted, and there were several enhancements to the BPI (baseline privacy interface) model used by DOCSIS3. According this Motorola article, in addition to Channel Bonding, IP Multicast, IPv6, and enhanced network management tools, security improvements in DOCSIS 3.0 include Enhanced Traffic Encryption, Enhanced Provisioning Security and Certificate Revocation. The article goes into further detail about those security enhancements, if you wish to learn more. A good read, IMO.
     
  15. CrusherW9

    CrusherW9 Registered Member

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    Why does the directional antenna matter? And as for the variance in signal strength, couldn't you just take multiple readings over a few minutes and average them to resolve that?
     
  16. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    A directional antenna matters because you can spin around and watch your signal strength and when it peaks, see where the antenna is pointing. Then from the other side of the building, do the same thing and then you have your 3 points of the triangle.

    With the omnidirectional antenna in your cell phone or notebook, you cannot see where the signal is coming from. Actually, they often use a bi-directional antennas but without knowing the internal antenna's orientation, you cannot tell which way (or two ways) it is optimized for. Some have two bi-directional antennas that are 90° apart but again, you need to actually see the antenna, know which is picking up the signal and where the signal is coming from.

    With a higher end directional antenna, spectrum analyzer, and good signal strength meter, you can pin-point the direction and elevation to the closest window in the apartment. Move 10 or 15 feet and do it again for a decent triangulation. But again, because cell phones and notebooks and wifi dongles are intentionally made to pick up signals from all directions, all you have signal strength, no direction.

    If you are standing in the middle of a courtyard surrounded by 4 large apartment buildings with potentially several dozen home wifi networks, again without knowing where the signal is coming from, how are you to tell which building the wifi signal is coming from? Or for that matter, since all the wifi frequencies will be between 2400 and 2500MHz and between 5725 and 5875MHz, how are you going to ensure you are checking the same wifi source - unless SSID (and the user changed the commonly used default name) is enabled or you have special software to ID the signal. You really need a spectrum analyzer of some sort.

    Then you will have to move to another point and try again - but at that point, because wifi has a maximum range of 300ft (92m) when unobstructed (that is with no walls, ceilings or floors to get in the way) with an omnidirectional antenna, you may not be certain the signal you saw in the courtyard is coming from the same source when checking from the outside of the courtyard.

    And note that 5GHz wifi has even less range.

    I am not saying you cannot do it with cell phones, but it is not an easy task in crowded wifi environments. But you are right in that the more samples you take the more accurate your locating will be.
     
  17. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    Things got delayed in the last week or two but if all goes well I am planning to buy the Arris SB6141 Docsis 3.0 modem and hopefully install both the new modem and the Cisco Valet router together in the next couple of weeks. Although my Docsic 2.0 modem still works I do get calls/letters from Comcast about upgrading to get more speed and I think my plan(Blast) goes to 50mbps. So the plan at this point is to do both modem & router at same time.

    One other question though. The new in box Cisco Valet M10 router that is several years old comes with a usb drive that seems to install Easy Connect Software to enable easy set up. But I am hesitant about using as I hate to install software due to phoning home etc. But is usb drive included for installing software the norm for most or all new routers? Are my hesitations justified at all? I had thought it would be set up using web based utility but if any of you were installing would you use the usb key to install the software? I think the web based utility is available but the directions I have found have not been that good. Anyway just wondered what the recommended set method would be.

    Thanks again.
     
  18. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    YES!!!!! Absolutely! Windows and all these devices already know how to network without any extra software added. You don't need any software to setup your networking. That is just extra fluff and yes, most routers include software. Just as most DVD drives, graphics cards, motherboards, etc. But typically they are all outdated by the time you get them, and include extra stuff you just do not need. Because all these devices use (MUST use) standard networking protocols, they cannot do anything to make their product standout EXCEPT aesthetics and extra junk you don't need.

    As noted above, you will need to call your ISP tech support to tell them you got a new modem. They will want the MAC address of the modem which will be on a sticker on the modem. See the method I use all the time in post #4 above. If me, I would have the modem, router and my PC all off, but ready to go with Ethernet cables connected. The ISP tech will most likely be more than willing to walk you through powering up each device as you are on the line. And it is likely the modem itself will have a quick setup guide that [hopefully] shows how to do it without installing extra software.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
  19. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

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    Skip this part; just use a browser to configure your devices.

    Yes, you're wasting money by not having a 3.0 modem with this plan; either get a slower plan (I'd recommend this since you obviously weren't needing/using the 50Mbps anyway) or get the modem.
     
  20. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    Okay so my instincts were good in not wanting to install software but is the browser utility fairly easy to use? I know I have to call Comcast and once they enter the new modem's mac/serial numbers and the lights on Docsis 3.0 settle to where they should be then the ethernet ports on router should work without any setup at all right? I hope so as the computer I plan to use for this has ethernet connected so from that point if I have internet access I can search for any problems that come up that I am not sure about. I am confident I can get into the browser utility but not so sure after that. Using this method will I have to enter into the browser utility the ip address or does it pull that from modem automatically? I assume I will have to set up wpa2 security also and I hope that is not too confusing and I would think that is it right?

    One side question; I am still planning likely get Arris SB6141 modem but I stopped at store today and they did not have any on hand. They did have plenty of Netgear Docsis 3.0 modems that are compatible with Comcast. Are the Netgear modems just as good with Comcast and do either of you(or anyone) use them with Comcast and would you recommend? Comcast told me over the phone that the SB6141 is just plug & play and I figure from your replies above that the Netgear must be as well right so the setup for the Arris or Netgear modem is the same and either just requires the phone call so Comcast can enter new modem numbers. Is that all correct?

    Thanks again.
     
  21. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    There is no browser "utility" per say.

    When the modem lights settle down, the ISP tech should then be able to "see" your modem. Then you connect and power up the router and it should then start communicating with the modem on its own. You don't need to do a thing. Then you power up your computer and it should automatically get an IP assignment from the router and you should at that point, have Internet access. Just make sure your computer is totally off (unplugged from the wall) before starting so all standby power is removed that might hold the computer's network device "alive".

    On your Ethernet side, you are totally good to go at this point.

    On the wireless side of your router, you do need to setup security and change your SSID and default wireless passphrase. Note the passphrase for wireless is NOT the same as the password word needed to access your router's menu. The passphrase is needed so your wireless devices can gain wireless access.

    I know nothing of the Netgear modem but DOCSIS 3.0 is DOCSIS 3.0. It should work the same way and Netgear is a reliable network equipment maker (my wireless router is a Netgear WNR3500L).

    You don't normally ever need to enter the modem's admin menu - unless you just want to see what is going on. But you will need to enter the router's menu to change the default SSID and passphrase for your wireless device.

    And yes, regardless the brand modem, you always need to contact your ISP so they can link the modem's MAC address to your account.
     
  22. Rolo42

    Rolo42 Registered Member

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    I like NetGear routers but I've no experience with their modems. Look for reviews and look at Comcast's forum for trends and opinions...even ask there; there is a fairly robust user community on Comcast with a few who know what they're talking about.

    For your modem and you router, download the manual from the OEM site and read it. You'll get instructions, the IP address to browse to, and the default login credentials (change those immediately!).
     
  23. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

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    190
    I just wanted to thank those that helped me on this thread especially Bill Bright and also Rolo42. I bought the Docsis 3.0 modem(SB6141) over the weekend and installed both new modem and new N router I had still unopened after sitting for several years yesterday. I followed your instructions exactly and they were a huge help. I did run into a Comcast problem(as usual for me!) as the person at Comcast who answered to provision new modem in their system had no idea what they were doing so it took way longer than necessary but once that got straightened out everything else was super easy thanks to your instructions. Once I had signal fixed from Comcast side the wifi set up probably took less than five minutes and I just used web interface as you recommended. All I seemed to need to do was name my wifi network and then put in a good password phrase for it as everything else seemed to be fine automatically as best I could tell as it defaulted to WPA2 security which is what I am using. I have not changed the default logon/pw to router itself and I did not see that come up anywhere but plan to look into how and change those as well soon.

    Everything is much faster and all connection problems I was having at times seem gone so far so I am very pleased and even better not intimidated by it any longer as I see how easy it was. So a big thanks again and your advice likely saved me from a lot of aggravation and potential difficulties and is much appreciated.
     
  24. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,271
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    Great! And you are welcome. I am glad you got it all sorted out.

    As for your router password, it should be in the router menu to change it. It is not as critical as the wifi passphrase, but should still be changed.
     
  25. roark37

    roark37 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Posts:
    190
    So far after about a week of use I love the new modem & router and all the connection problems are gone and the speed is much faster than before. So really pleased but have a follow up question; I have tested internet speed several times on different laptops/desktops at the Oola site and with ethernet I have got 62 mbps with one laptop and around 83mbps with another. But when I have tested same laptops using wifi I have only got as high as 26 mbps and a low of around 16 mbps but usually in the low 20's. Is that normal or typical for the wifi test speed to be so different from ethernet? Even with those differences I can't say I really notice web browsing any slower using wifi and I don't stream movies or download large files often where maybe that difference would be more noticeable but just wanted to see if my test numbers seemed normal? Thank you.
     
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