router installation question

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by kraeon, Feb 22, 2005.

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  1. kraeon

    kraeon Registered Member

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    here's my question if anyone can help:

    i recently aquired a hawking technology router. model pn9249. i am trying to install it on my computer. i am having trouble getting my pc to recognize it is there and working. i dont have any sort of setup disk or anything because it was a stupid hand me down. so any suggestions on what i should do to solve this problem....im not a genius about computers but i have some knowledge.

    thanks.
     
  2. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    Just a quick check...

    Have you tried using your brower and going to:

    "home"
    -or-
    127.0.0.1

    and seeing if it will bring it up.

    do an IPCONFIG /ALL and see what "Gateway" it is listing and see if you can browse to that

    Good luck :)
     
  3. kraeon

    kraeon Registered Member

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    i tried all 3 and got nothing...when i tried config/all...it skipped right out of dos and shut the window...im really at a loss. when its hooked up, my connection says its working, but its not getting any pings back and i can't get to the internet. seriously, i really don't get why its not working. i need like specific directions....i've never had a router before...
     
  4. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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  5. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    For starters, what OS are you running?
    Second, Why do you need a router? Are you connecting to another network or are you just needing to network pc's together in your house. If all you are wanting to do is share an internet connection...i recommend a switch instead of a router.

    If you must :D

    try: 192.168.1.1
    User: (leave blank)
    pw: password
     
  6. kraeon

    kraeon Registered Member

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    im using xp.

    im wanting to use the router for an xbox i have so i dont have to boot my roommate off the pc so i can play. if this is totally the wrong hardware that i have...what it a good suggestion for what im trying to do?
     
  7. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Hi Capp,

    Just curious. Why would you recommend a box switch over a router? A router gives you the benefit of a hardware firewall. They are so inexpensive now anyway. Just wondering.

    Gerard
     
  8. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    More than likely the router has a built-in HTTP and/or Telnet server for management. I would guess that it uses the private IP "192.168.1.1" or "192.168.0.1" as it's default like many such devices, but that's only a guess.

    You will likely need to manually configure your PC to be on the same subnet as either of these addresses. While logged in as Administrator, go to the right click on your LAN adapter, probably listed as Local Area Connection under Start | Settings | Network Connections, and select Properties. Then select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and hit the Properties button. Select the "Use the following IP address..." radio button and fill out the IP address with, for example, 192.168.1.2 and the Subnet Mask as 255.255.255.0. You don't really need to set the Gateway right now, but you can set to our guessed 192.168.1.1 if you want. Then click Ok and another Ok as I recall. Then try to ping 192.168.1.1. Or try going to http:\\192.168.1.1. (Sorry if I went into too much detail. I'm not trying to be condescending or anything, I just wanted to make sure you knew the steps.) If that doesn't work try setting your IP to 192.168.0.2 and try pinging 192.168.0.1. Odds are that it is one of those two. If neither works than you are going to likely have to find documentation because otherwose guessing the default private IP address could be a big pain in the rear.

    [EDIT: Actually, just save yourself a step or two... and set your Subnet Mask to something like 255.255.0.0... then you can test out both 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.0.1 without having to change your PC's IP again. Also, if you do get into the device, I have no idea what the default password is... you're on your own there! Lastly, once you get into the device you will want to turn on the DHCP server part... then you can go back to your PC's LAN adapter settings at set the IP address back to "Get IP Address Automatically" (or whatever the radio button says.]
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2005
  9. kraeon

    kraeon Registered Member

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    thank you alec...i will try that.

    another question.

    im running through comcast using their modem. if i change any of the settings, how will i know what to return the settings to?

    i really do feel like an idiot asking some of these questions.
     
  10. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    I wouldn't if you are like 90% of home broadband users who are allocated a single dynamic IP on their cable/dsl modem. In such a case, a switch would not work with more than one device connected to the switch also trying to connect to the public internet through the cable/dsl modem. You must use a device that is capable of Network Address Translation (NAT) if you wish to support more than one device on the private side of a cable/dsl modem that receives a single dynamic IP. Not to mention, but a switch is incapable of performing things like DHCP and PPPoE. Switches also lack any kind of hardware firewall functionality. No, since home broadband routers are so cheap nowdays, a router is definitely the way to go.

    [EDIT: Unless you are talking about setting up ICS on one of your PC's and then leaving that PC on all of the time... in which case you are now just having that PC running ICS act as NAT router and DHCP client/server. Why have a PC do that when for almost the same price as a switch, you can have a small router appliance?]
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2005
  11. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    I have DSL and I have my DSL 2-wire router and it goes into a DSL switch that the rest of my PC's connect into. The router only connects to my ISP so I get my DHCP settings.

    My Switch is a Linksys Cable/dsl router that has built in firewall, filtering and DHCP capabilities. I would recommend using something comparable if all you are doing is sharing a connection.

    Many will argue the methods for using switches/routers and I am not saying one way is better than another. It's personal preference.
     
  12. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    Sounds pretty much like what I said
     
  13. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    Ummm... would you like to think about that one again? ;)
     
  14. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    Right... apparently I was still typing out the instructions for manually changing the client PC IP address when you responded. It's not of much help to tell someone to go to 192.168.1.1 if they don't know how to change their own IP.
     
  15. kraeon

    kraeon Registered Member

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    im going with alec on this one capp.

    alec...much thanks. all is well now. it is working fine now.

    thank you very much alec for being so detailed, it helped my a lot.
     
  16. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    Ummm...no I wouldn't.

    Would you like for me to take a photo of the sticker on the front of it and post it here

    ********************
    Cisco Systems
    Linksys EtherFast Cable/DSL Router with 4-port switch
    model: BEFSR41
     
  17. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    I'm glad you found some help with this one. I did not know you didn't know how to release and renew an IP address once you are connected or I would have instructed you to do so. My bad! :)
     
  18. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    You have a comcast cable modem (aka router) installed and you are hooking up a second router. That is why I recommended using a switch. The comcast modem will grab you and IP address from your ISP and then you can share that IP on a LAN with a switch, which is what I was referring to way up at the top. Sorry I wasn't more clear on the subject. :D
     
  19. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    You say tomatoe, I say tomoto....

    The BEFSR41 that he calls a "switch" is the most popular ROUTER on the market today.

    The BEFSR41 is a ROUTER.
     
  20. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    I think you need to relax. Take a breath of fresh air. *puppy*

    The BEFSR41 is most definitely a router just as it says in its name "Linksys EtherFast Cable/DSL Router". Yes, it includes a built-in 4-port switch -- just as most home broadband routers do these days -- hence the use of the word "with" in the phrase "with 4-port switch."

    I'm not sure what you are not understanding. It's a router with a built-in switch as opposed to a router with a single LAN port, or as opposed to a router with a built-in 4-port hub. But a router that includes a built-in switch is a very different thing that just a plain switch. A plain switch is purely a layer-2 device. A router, in contrast, works at layer-3 and in the case of a home broadband router performs NAT which is a layer-3 packet adjustment. Look, I'm not trying to pull one over on ya... I'm just trying to let you know that what you are calling a switch is called by everyone else in the industry a router (regardless if it has a built-in switch or not).
     
  21. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    Ok, now once again you better get your terminology straight or you are going to confuse the heck out of someone. A "cable modem" is not the same thing as a router, so don't be putting the "aka" thing in there. The phrase "cable modem" is the proper term for the device sitting at the customer premises that mediates the connection over the coax line and is compliant with Data-Over-Cable Service Interface Specfications (DOCSIS). If you read the spec, they define it as "A modulator-demodulator at subscriber locations intended for use in conveying data communications on a cable television system." That is what a cable modem is. Now, yes, some cable modems have built-in routers as well (just like some routers have built-in switches.... ahem). Anyway, the proper term for an integrated device with both a DOCSIS cable modem and a built-in router is "gateway". But in no instance that I am aware of is it ever proper to simply refer to the cable modem itself as a router.
     
  22. Capp

    Capp Registered Member

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    Thanks :p
     
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