Router and DNS proxy

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Fly, Jun 28, 2012.

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  1. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    This is about a Sitecom router that I own.

    By default, the router uses a DNS proxy. The DNS addresses/servers are not the same as the ones provided by my ISP, although I can't preclude that they are backup servers.

    When I boot my computer I sometimes cannot access the internet, apparently because the web addresses won't resolve.
    In those situations deactivating and reactivating the modem and the router is required. Sometimes I do a full reset.

    It appears that there is no option to disable the DNS proxy.

    Is there some workaround that is possible ?

    I don't see the benefit of a DNS proxy in the router. Is this common ?

    It doesn't feel very secure either :(
     
  2. Raza0007

    Raza0007 Registered Member

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    You can always change DNS server addresses in your router. I am sure the router provides a way to do it. There will be an option to "automatically obtain the DNS addresses" in which case the router will automatically obtain these addresses from the DSL or Cable modem.
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I agree, you should be able to access the router's admin menu and change the settings. You might check out OpenDNS.
     
  4. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    Thanks, but apparently not.

    It seems there is only one way, that is to manually configure the setup with a static IP (no DHCP).

    Officially, a dynamic IP is required although the IP rarely changes.

    The manual suggests changing the network adapter setup in Windows XP.

    I'm not sure if the DNS proxy is really the problem. There are several reports of problems with my ISP and this particular router.

    It was a cheap router anyway :(
     
  5. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Technically you don't need a router - though for security reasons, everyone should. But my point is, since technically, all you need is your gateway device (typically a modem - not router) you should be able to use any router, and set it up using the IP address assigned by your ISP.
     
  6. Raza0007

    Raza0007 Registered Member

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    I think you might have a Gateway not a router. With a router you typically need a modem to connect to your ISP. If you only have one device it is definitely a Gateway.

    If you can not figure out a way to change DNS in your Gateway or router, you can always change the DNS addresses in your computer's network adapter. The DNS addresses entered in your network card have priority over the DNS addresses entered in your router. Go to the TCP/IP v4 setting of your network adapter and enter manual DNS there. You can enter OpenDNS, Norton DNS, or Google DNS.
    What exactly is the problem? What I understood from your initial post was that you did not want to use the ISP's DNS server and want to change to another DNS server. Was this your original question?
     
  7. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    The real issue ?

    'When I boot my computer I sometimes cannot access the internet, apparently because the web addresses won't resolve.'

    When I turn on my computer it seems I always get internet access, but for some reason I cannot always access the www ! Same goes for email.
    The connection to the router seems to be functioning, and ipconfig /all suggests everything is fine.

    The device is a router, it cannot function as a modem.

    'If you can not figure out a way to change DNS in your Gateway or router, you can always change the DNS addresses in your computer's network adapter. The DNS addresses entered in your network card have priority over the DNS addresses entered in your router. Go to the TCP/IP v4 setting of your network adapter and enter manual DNS there. You can enter OpenDNS, Norton DNS, or Google DNS.'

    I'll give it a try. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2012
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Careful. There are many devices sold today that contain both a router and modem (the gateway device) in one box. Some even include a WAP (wireless access point) - often then incorrectly called a "wireless router". And most of these boxes also include yet another network device, a 4-port Ethernet switch. Four discrete network devices that just happen to share the same case, main PCB, and power supply.

    I think you are a bit confused. The WWW is the Internet. So if you have Internet access, you are on the WWW (world wide web).

    What sounds like is happening to me is you are getting "network" access - that is, you can connect to your network - everything on your side of your router) but your network cannot connect to the Internet.

    This could easily be a firewall issue, but I suspect your router is not obtaining a proper IP assignment from your gateway device (the modem).

    Understand, if you can access your router's internal menu with your browser, your computer is setup properly!!!!

    If me, I would reset the network. Unplug everything (network devices and computers) from the wall and leave it unplugged for about 5 minutes. Unplugging from the wall ensures there are no standby voltages present, and it leaves enough time for your ISP to see you are off-line.

    Then power up the gateway device (the modem), and wait for the lights to settle down. Then plug in the router (with no computers attached - yet) and wait for those lights. Then one computer at a time and see what happens.
     
  9. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    Mostly correct. I think I have tried sending a ping to a website on the internet and it didn't work. I'm not sure though, that was quite a while ago.
    For as far as I know, in these situations I cannot access the router's interface either but it appears that the wireless connection is up and running !

    Not likely a firewall issue, I've had this with both the Kaspersky and the Avira suite.

    The weird thing is, this usually works fine for an entire day. But sometimes, when I boot the computer the next day the connection seems fine but I cannot access any webpage ! On the LAN side everything seems fine. Although I cannot access the router's web interface (192.X).

    So why do I lose real access to the internet when I turn on the computer after having it turned off during the night ?

    I've gone beyond that. I've flushed the NVRAM, reinstalled the latest firmware, done a full reset. This often works for a while, but then the same issue comes up again !
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    How do you know everything is fine on the LAN side if you cannot access the router's web interface? Can you still access files on other networked computers? Or print to a networked printer?

    I would swap out any factory made Ethernet cables too. They no doubt are cheap.
     
  11. Fly

    Fly Registered Member

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    SEEMS fine. I don't 'know'.

    According to the software of the adapter I get an IP address (LAN), subnet mask and default gateway. From that perspective everything seems fine.

    There is nothing else in that particular network.
     
  12. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    So is there another computer you can connect to see how that holds? Have you tried a different port on your router. I have current have a 3-port router that used to be 4, and a 6-port Ethernet switch that used to be an 8-port switch. Those ports are a little tougher than factory made Ethernet cable connections, but not much.
     
  13. woomera

    woomera Registered Member

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    if you have ping replies from your router it should be fine cause you have internet access most of the time.
    as for bypassing proxy dns set on your router you dont even need to change the router's settings, just change the dns server in your pc in your connection options. then your computer wont use the router to query the names instead it will go straight to the dns you have set.
     
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