Rogers cable modem incompatible with routers??

Discussion in 'hardware' started by taleblou, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    Because rogers cable modem do not provide full stealth mode for firewall, I thought to connect a router that has hardware firewall to hide the ports that the software firewall does not hide.

    To my surprise non of routers worked with my rogers cable modem. Neither a new D-link and a LINKSYS. So now I do not know what to do to stealth and hide all my ports. I have tried several firewalls like comodo but none worked. I think this is due to roger on purpose left certain port access open for their tech or snooping in I hear.

    Anyone else have this issue with their rogers cable?
     
  2. WildByDesign

    WildByDesign Registered Member

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    Yes, I am using Rogers as well and experienced the same. I ended up looking online and buying a compatible used cable modem. Now I don't have to pay monthly rental fee either. There are only a small amount of modems that are compatible with Rogers though.
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Something is not right here and I suspect it is a setting. I say this because the modem uses an Ethernet port and Ethernet uses an industry standard. This is what allows users to connect their computer directly to the modem, or go through a router. In other words, the modem should not know what is connected to it, either a computer, or the router.

    I would put all devices in default modes and see what happens.
     
  4. rrrh1

    rrrh1 Registered Member

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    I agree, but ISP's are tight lipped on what settings would be needed.

    Here's what I found online.

    You will pay either $5.99 for monthly rental on their equipment
    pay premium support $$ or figure it out yourself.

    Name of provider hidden behind ***'s.

    My Own Router (not from *** )
    If you want to use your own router not one supplied by
    *** you can contact your router's manufacturer for assistance
    or consider signing up for Premium Technical Support
    from *** ***. If neither of these is an option for you,
    and you would like free support from ***, simply use ***
    provided networking equipment when attempting to network
    multiple computers/devices.

    If you would like to upgrade from a modem to a Wi-Fi
    gateway, please chat with us online.

    Some modem / gateway provided by ISP's hide settings you may need. I have not been able to discover the settings in such instances. This is done with custom builds of equipment only for that ISP. Look at the D2200D on the Netgear site for example. This is also true for Cable DOCSIS Modem / gateway.

    rrrh1(arch1)
     
  5. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    Hi:

    No I put the disk in and sued its installation cd. It detected the network card and when was looking for the internet network connection, it failed with message your router is not connected. Please connect. I checked and triple checked and re-started and the same message popped up. This is for D-link router.

    With the LINKSYS nothing at all, the same issue. Not reading the router??
     
  6. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    true bell, rogers have costume build modems that only works with them.
     
  7. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    The issue is that I am fine with the rogers modem only if it would allow to stealth and hide all ports. Software firewalls do not this which is strange? When I tested several firewalls incl. windows at firewall leak test sites, always the same. The same ports shown "CLOSED" while the rest were "STEALTHED". There was a half dozen to a dozen ports that showed closed instead of stealth.

    I do not know why Rogers would block its customers from securing their system.

    some of the port are dangerous one that show closed. Like "HTTP port"
     
  8. rrrh1

    rrrh1 Registered Member

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    I am wondering If we aren't getting device names mixed up.

    Modem: converts the signal from the Cable/DSL line (that your internet provider installed in your house) into something your computer can understand. (for only one computer)

    Router: is a device that allows multiple computers to connect to a internet connection that was set up to give access to only one machine. (multiple devices computer)(is like hallways and staircases on local network)

    Gateway: combines both. (Eg.: your TV cable goes into the back, and multiple computers connect via Ethernet cables to the front) (is like a door to an outside network) (Does Router and Modem services in one device)
    A node on a network that serves as an entrance to another network. In enterprises, the gateway is the computer that routes the traffic from a workstation to the outside network that is serving the Web pages. In homes, the gateway is the ISP that connects the user to the Internet.
    In enterprises, the gateway node often acts as a proxy server and a firewall. The gateway is also associated with both a router, which use headers and forwarding tables to determine where packets are sent, and a switch, which provides the actual path for the packet in and out of the gateway.

    From:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSL_modem

    A digital subscriber line (DSL) modem is a device used to connect a computer or router to a telephone line which provides the digital subscriber line service for connectivity to the Internet, which is often called DSL broadband.

    The term DSL modem is technically used to describe a modem which connects to a single computer, through an Ethernet Port, USB port, or is installed in a computer PCI slot.

    The more common DSL router is a standalone device that combines the function of a DSL modem and a router, and can connect multiple computers through multiple Ethernet ports or an integral wireless access point.

    Also called a residential gateway, a DSL router usually manages the connection and sharing of the DSL service in a home or small office network.

    For More Information:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_modem
    http://www.ehow.com/about_6648327_difference-between-gateway-router.html
    http://www.techrepublic.com/article/understanding-the-differences-between-gateways-and-routers/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS

    I does not help when "a DSL/ router" is really a Gateway.

    rrrh1(arch1)
     
  9. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Not sure what you mean here. These are Ethernet devices and Ethernet must comply with IEEE 802.3 industry standards, or it is not Ethernet.

    As for your definitions, actually a router simply connects or isolates 2 networks. There is only 1 input and 1 output on a router - period. And note you can have a network that consists of just a single computer.

    BUT, most home routers have an "integrated" 4-port Ethernet "switch" that allows you to connect multiple Ethernet devices (computers, printers, NAS devices, more switches) on your network (everything on your side, the WAN side of the router) to the router.

    If you have a "wireless router", technically there is no such thing. Wireless router is simply a marketing term to indicate a network device that combines (integrates) a router and a WAP (wireless access point) into the same box (typically along with a 4-port Ethernet switch). The WAP actually connects to the router's single input via a 5th internal Ethernet port on the integrated switch. These 3 devices are technically 3 discrete network devices that just happen to share a common circuit board, case, and power supply to save space and money. They may also have a little mini computer (typically Linux based) integrated on the board (perhaps in a single IC) too that is used to provide a single administrative setup menu for all the integrated devices.

    Some devices actually are 4-way devices in that they may also contain a cable or DSL modem (the gateway device) into the same box as the router, switch and WAP. Still 4 discrete devices - just in the same box. This is along the lines as stereo or home theater "receivers" have in the same case, the pre-amplifier, amplifier and tuner. Or how our motherboards today have integrated sound cards and even video cards. Separate devices, all in the same box.

    @taleblou - please describe your whole network setup. And if possible provide the model number of this Rogers device. Note I never, as in NEVER EVER use the disks that come with network devices. This is because, again, because network devices must comply with industry standards - not proprietary protocols. So your D-Link and Linksys devices, along with the network card in your computers, and Windows too already know how to communicate via Ethernet (and 802.11 wireless, if present) with needing any extra help from any installation disk.
     
  10. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    hi:

    Well I tried it at first without the disk setup, but has yellow exclamation mark on icon saying no connection and a test and no signal. nothing fixed it. SO used the disk and it gave that issue. Now my network is simple. I have a roger wireless modem that has 4 ports. I have to pc and a magic-jack connected. SO all I did was connect one ethernet cable form one of the 4 ports of the modem (port 1) to the WAN port of the router and then connect my pcs to 2 of the ports on the routers(port 1 and 2). Then I waited until all lights were fine and went to the setting of the modem and used d-link auto wizard for connection and thats it. rebooted the pcs.

    my rogers wireless modem is "CGN3"
     
  11. rrrh1

    rrrh1 Registered Member

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    Was he configuring a "Gateway" device or a "router" ?

    If it was a router it does not have a place for the telephone wire or coax from the cable company to connect to.

    Your ISP usually won't help you set up a gateway "modem" not supplied by them.

    I am waiting for the model numbers to know exactly what devices they have.

    rrrh1
     
  12. rrrh1

    rrrh1 Registered Member

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    Glad you got it sorted!

    We got cross posted...

    End of message...
     
  13. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, not directly, but they do typically have a WAN or upchannel port that connects to the modem, which then connects to ISP.

    Oh? Has the problem been sorted out? @ taleblou - are you still getting these errors? Can you get out to the Internet? If not, can you access the router's admin menu by entering the router's IP address in your browser?
     
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