Recovery CD HOW?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by rafaeldb, Jun 26, 2006.

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  1. rafaeldb

    rafaeldb Registered Member

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    I want to create a Recovery CD for my company, but I would like to be a bootable cd, just put it on and it will recovery my C: partition with windows. I tried to play with Acronis True Image but all I could do is a .tib file.

    Can anyone help me how I can do that?
     
  2. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    The main menu of ATI has an option on the left side called "Create Bootable Rescue Media".
    That's the one you need to create a Recovery CD.
    That CD allows you to recover a .tib-file, that contains your complete system partition, without needing Windows and ATI.
     
  3. rafaeldb

    rafaeldb Registered Member

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    Oh ok, but theres any way to put the tib file on the boot cd? Becouse if i use the "Create Bootable Recue Media" it creates a iso file ready to burn.


     
  4. starsfan09

    starsfan09 Registered Member

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    Since Rafael brought this up, I was wondering something.

    Can you make a "Back-Up" on your HD from the Boot-CD menu? This of course would not let Windows boot, but however, I'm thinking this would be a better method of making a Back-up because you don't have the Operating System loading up.
     
  5. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    That iso.file needs to be burned on a CD and contains the software of ATI to backup or restore.

    If you put that Recovery CD in your CD-drive and you reboot your computer you don't get Windows,
    you will get the ATI-menu, where you can restore a .tib-file from a DVD, CD, another partition or external harddisk.
    That's how ATI works and if you don't have a .tib-file, you can't recover anything.
     
  6. chaw_pig

    chaw_pig Registered Member

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    of course. ti can do what you want. you must create backup cd/dvd from Windows or Mustang's bart pe plugin. (You cant do it from linux environment)
    Thanks to Mustang (if you use bart pe plugin), You can add the bootable media feature to a backup image on DVD/CD by using the Options menu. Go to Tool/Options/Default Backup Options/Media Components. The General tab allows you to add the bootable option to the media. The Advanced tab allows you specify Disk Director (Optional) and other options to add.
    Now you can create backup file with bootable media features like one click restore (Beware of using this feature, it will format your whole physical hard drive and restore your backup image.)

    That is the recovery cd like the ones from HP or any other vendors...
     
  7. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    The quality of a backup is the same whether done from the rescue CD or using True Image in Windows. The better method is to do it while still in Windows. This is because you don't have to re-boot. The process is usually faster and if necessary you can let it run in the background and continue working.

    Xpilot
     
  8. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I'm using and "External HDD Seagate 160GB USB 2.0 7200RPM 8MB" for backup and restore.
    My two internal harddisks are both "WD Raptor WD740GD HDD 74gb 10000rpm SATA 8mb Cache 4.5ms"

    I did some timings and these are the results :

    My system partition [C:] = 15.49 GB and the
    Image backup file (.tib) = 8.05 GB (normal compression).
    All timings are done between "Proceed" and "OK" button. So manual actions are not included.

    Using Acronis Rescue CD
    The backup took 40 minuts
    The restore took 36 minuts

    Using Acronis True Image under Windows
    The backup took 7 minuts ---> quite a difference with the Rescue CD (40 minuts)
    The restore took 38 minuts
     
  9. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    As I said your backup under Windows should be quicker. In your case dramatically so, nearly six times faster! As I have never backed up after booting from the CD I don't know how much longer it would take for me but it would be a safe bet that the difference would be considerable.
    Your restore times are bit on the slow side. If you could reconfigure and restore, using the cd, from an internal drive image you could speed things up considerably. My shot in the dark guess is that you could restore in less than five minutes with your volumes and computer.

    Xpilot
     
  10. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Xpilot,
    If I copy/paste my .tib-file from my external harddisk to my second internal harddisk and I restore from there, my restoration will be much faster (1/3 of 38 minuts : copy/paste + restoration).
    If you should have any doubts about my timings, it must be very easy for you to do the same tests without hurting your system in anyway.
    Frankly, I'm also wondering why the restoration from my external harddisk takes 38 minutes, while the backup takes only 7 minuts, but until now I have no clue why there is such a big difference.

    Nice talking to you :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2006
  11. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    It all depends on how well the drivers provided on the Recovery CD match the needs of your external drive. The Drivers provided by TI for internal drives are in many cases a much better match and therefore run a lot more quickly.
    I have left the experimentation phase and have evolved a different way of using True Image which is IMHO is faster and more secure than using external USB drives. If you are interested see my rather long posts in the last couple of days. If I could find how to give a shortcut link I would :)

    Xpilot
     
  12. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    My reasoning is like this :
    1. I separated my system from my data : two partitions and I'm very glad I did.
    2. That wasn't enough for me, so I stored each partition on a separate physical harddisk : two harddisks.
    3. My backup/restore is on an external harddisk, that doesn't need to be connected to the internet.
    I always disable my internet connection during backup or restore.
    4. Speed isn't my priority #1, safety is my priority #1. Speed is a very strange thing. If I run a backup or restore, I can do other things at home/work. So most of the time I don't even feel the speed. I only feel the speed, when I'm staring at my computer.

    BUT I'm always willing to listen to any other approach, because I can be wrong and I'm certainly not arrogant to listen to other people's suggestions. :)
    You don't have to explain me in full detail, I only need arrows or hints.
    I always think in big lines, not in details. I always look at the wood, not at the trees. :)
     
  13. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Hi, ErikAlbert,
    Just in outline this is what I do.
    I backup images to an internal slave drive while in Windows. I do not verify and you will see why it is not necessary in a moment.
    My master Hard drive is in an exchangeable caddy so it can be swapped for another in an instant.
    After a new image is created I swap over the hard drives and, this is the key point, I do a restore to the replacement drive and re-boot. You will appreciate there are now two upto date copies of the master drive, one in use and the other safe in its caddy. The population of images on the slave drive have been PROVED by doing actual restores.
    So with these two levels of backup and a history of proven backups to be called on if needed I feel secure enough.
    The incidental benefit of doing things this way is that some of it can be automated and restores from one internal hard drive to another is the fastest method available.

    Xpilot
     
  14. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    If I understand you well, you have a hard-drive (= caddy), which allows you to load different harddisks, just like different DVD/CD's in a DVD/CD-drive.
    I never heard of such a hardware component.
    You are certainly right about the best speed : disk to disk.

    I had the best speed when I used my second WD Raptor harddisk as a backup medium.
    But both internal harddisks are constantly on-line, while my external harddisk is off-line, just like your removable harddisks. That was the only reason why I bought an external harddisk.
    I guess a removable harddisk is faster as an external USB-harddisk, although I have no experience with it.

    It's too late for me now, but I will consider it when my external harddisk is worned out. :)
     
  15. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Removable Drive Drawers/Mobile racks is what this maker call them.http://www.startech.com/Product/Category.aspx?MLID=7&WCLID=387&WCID=190&c=UK
    The principle of exchangable disk stores has been around for a long time. Though I have only recently re-discovered them in their current PC form. They need no chip sets as they just plug in. A couple of indicator Leds and a fan in the fixed mount is really all there is to them.

    Xpilot
     
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