Recapture Unallocated Space

Discussion in 'Acronis Disk Director Suite' started by Gidds, Jun 16, 2008.

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  1. Gidds

    Gidds Registered Member

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    I currently have two areas or unallocated space on my laptop hard drive
    2.995 GB & 1.373 MB

    I created a Logical Partition (drive S and its about 2.5 GB)
    and i would like to add the unallocated area to it, to make it a bit bigger

    I tried to resize the S drive, but that isn't working
    Any help?!?

    <Kolo, i thought it best to move this to its own thread>
     
  2. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Gidds:

    The unallocated space must be located adjacent to the partition that you want to resize. If not, you can move things around to make this possible. Can you post a screen shot from Disk Director (running in manual mode) that shows your current disk layout?
     
  3. Gidds

    Gidds Registered Member

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    i did not know that

    no, i cant post a screen shot :(
    but it goes like this...

    FAT16 Pri 101.9 MB
    Recovery (D) Pri 7.002 GB
    Unallocated 2.995 GB
    NTFS(C) Pri,Act. 61.93 GB
    Unallocated 1.373 MB
    Storage(S) 2.497 GB
     
  4. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    OK; if you want all of the unallocated space to be added to your partition named "Storage" then try this procedure. The first step involves modifying the Windows system partition C:, so you should shut down Windows and reboot to the recovery version of Disk Director on CD. If you haven't yet created a recovery disk, use the Bootable Media Builder application on the Tools menu to create one. Then boot your PC from the CD and do the following:

    1. Right-click on your Windows C partition and choose "Resize". On the graphic image, point to the middle of the image and drag the partition's contents all the way to the left so that there is no unallocated space before the partition and all of the unallocated space is after the partition.
    2. Choose Commit (click on the checkered flag). This operation may take a little time to complete because it may involve moving a lot of data.
    3. When the operation completes, reboot into Windows. You may see a message about Windows has installed a generic disk and needs to reboot. If so, reboot again.
    4. Now with all of the unallocated space between C and S partitions, try the resize again on the S partition. You should be able to do this using the Windows version of Disk Director since you won't be modifying the Windows system partition. Drag the left border of the S partition to the left until there is no unallocated space either before or after the partition.
    5. Click on commit and you should be done.

    Note that you should back up all of your data before doing any partitioning tasks. If you have a copy of Acronis True Image then make a complete disk backup before doing anything. Better safe than sorry!
     
  5. Gidds

    Gidds Registered Member

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    Hey
    Thanks for your Help!!

    When you said The unallocated space must be located adjacent to the partition that you want to re-size
    That was the key!
    So I started messing around (in windows) and was able to shift things around :D
    When i messed with the primary C drive, it said it needed to Reboot
    and went into some kind of a Dos screen to do it's thing, then rebooted itself into Windows, Very Nicely Done!!

    So I didnt follow your very nice dirrections, and the program took good care of me nevertheless
    ...of course I have a backup image of my drive so i was feeling brave too!

    Thanks again!!
     
  6. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Gidds:

    Great! Glad that worked. I usually recommend using the boot CD because some PC hardware is not supported in the recovery environment (Linux-based), and if you start an operation from Windows that requires rebooting and something doesn't work, there will not be any error messages telling what went wrong. So it's like flying blind. If done from the recovery CD then you can see what happens and get error messages (if any).

    However, your hardware must be fully supported so everything worked as it should.
     
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