questions & software info

Discussion in 'ten-forward' started by Kathyhl, Oct 24, 2003.

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  1. Kathyhl

    Kathyhl Registered Member

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    Hi again good people :),

    I have this box coming up when I turn on my PC that says to type in network p/w. I'd like to get rid of this, but don't know how. I've asked a similar question, which was responded to, and thank you so much. That box was just asking to put in p/w, not network p/w. I have a win98. Also, does anyone know how to get rid of the background box that the text is in on your desktop icons? Thank you all for the great knowledge I've accumulated here.
     
  2. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    Hi Kathy,

    This was the thread where you asked the previous question about the login box...

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=15201;start=msg95055#msg95055

    In a reply (#3) over there I attached the image of two types of Windows login boxes. At that time you had the simplier "Welcome to Windows" login box. Can you first tell us if you were able to make that one go away by following what was posted there?

    Next, when did this new "network password" box start appearing? Was it right after fixing the other one, or have you updated or installed anything since then? Please confirm if the new login box looks like the upper one in my image in that other thread (it is called "Enter Network Password" over there)... Are any of the three fields in that login box filled in? If so, with what? Also, which button do you hit and what happens when you do hit it?

    Can you describe this a little more? I'm not sure what you are referring to here?
     
  3. Kathyhl

    Kathyhl Registered Member

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    Hi WLM, and thank you for responding. I had tried to network with my other PC, but it didn't work. After that the box came up wanting a network passwork, it says User name: with my name, and p/w, that is empty. I can either hit enter or click OK and it goes away, but it does come up everytime I turn on the PC.

    In regards to the second question. I'm not that great at explaining things, but I'm going to give it the old college try here. I have quite a few shortcut icons on my desktop, under the icons are the names to what they are, which is written in a box. Someone once told me I could get rid of the boxes and simply have the text directly on the desktop under the icons without the text being in the little boxes. Gosh I hope that makes some kind of sense. :oops:

    Thanks for your help.
     
  4. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    It sounds like when you tried to configure a local network for hooking your PCs together, it modified the Network configs on your system.

    Look in Control Panel > Network > Configuration (tab) In the list there is probably an entry that says "Client for Microsoft Networks". If you aren't using that, you can highlight it and press Remove then OK. The PC will need to reboot and should no longer ask for that network password. (If you need it again restoring it is as easy as selecting it via the Add button on that screen.)

    As to making the boxes around the icon descriptions disappear, I think this is what you are looking for:

    http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/article02-137
     
  5. Kathyhl

    Kathyhl Registered Member

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    LWM, Thank you so much. You have no idea how long I have been looking for what that person was talking about a few years ago re removing the boxes around the text under the icons on my desktop :D

    I just used the ace registry cleaner that I read about in here, and couldn't believe it cleared up 240MB of space for me! I used it on my daughters PC yesterday, and she thinks she might have lost a few small programs. We looked in her recycle bin, but nothing was there, so I'm hoping those programs were just moved around and not lost. I checked and she didn't have her recycle bin set to empty on shutting down, so it doesn't make sense to me. Quite a few people were praising that program in here, and so far it seems to have done what it claims to on my PC.

    But I digress, thanks for helping me with that annoying p/w box that I set up myself!
     
  6. spydespiser

    spydespiser Registered Member

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    Hi Kathyhl

    I'm Pretty new to certain practices myself, but it is my understanding that cleaning the registry only removes the flag which then makes the HD space previously occupied overwritable(so is used for leftover registry entries)
    i.e the registry tells pc where on HD program resides that is why you have gained so much space and the bin is empty, your pc doesn't know the program exists

    I have used www.pcinspector.de/file_recovery/UK/welcome.htm in the past for deleted docs/files but have not used for a while so do not know if still safe/spyware free

    Any programs you install/files saved in meantime have a chance to overwrite previously occupied clusters as they are classed as available

    maybe somebody else can give you more/better advice

    hope this helps in some small way :)

    SpyD :cool:
     
  7. spydespiser

    spydespiser Registered Member

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    Introduction to the File Allocation Table (FAT)

    Every disk or hard disk, that has been formatted with the FAT system is built as follows

    The write process

    The operating system writes system information like file size and first cluster number to the directory entry, position information to the FAT, and data itself to the data area.


    The read process

    (1) System information, like file name, size and first cluster number is determined from the directory entry.

    (2) Further cluster numbers are found from the file allocation table (FAT) and read from the corresponding clusters in the data area.




    The file system exists from a number of special areas of the disk set aside for organization when the disk is formatted: the master boot record, the partition table, the boot record, the file allocation table (from which the FAT system takes its name), and the root directory. At a low level, disk are organized into 512 byte groups called sectors. The FAT system allocates space for files using a unit called a cluster, made up of an integral number of sectors.

    A boot record is a sector which contains code that can is executed by the computer. The master boot record is the first boot record that the computer executes when it accesses the hard disk. Additonally a boot record contains important information about the FAT file system, e.g. the cluster size and the positions of the file allocation table, data area and the root directory.

    The file allocation table (FAT), located behind the boot record is a database that associates clusters of disk space with files. It has one entry (each 12,16 or 32 bits) for each cluster. Because the first two entries are reserved for the file system, the third entry and those following are assigned to clusters of disk space (data area). Files saved in the data area are not necessarily stored successively and therefore the operating system has to know where a complete file is located in the data area. That is the task of the FAT. For any cluster that is used by a file but is not the file's last cluster, the FAT entry contains the number of the next cluster used by the file. When a program asks the operating system (OS) to provide the content of a file, the OS has to read the first cluster of a file. It then looks at the corresponding first cluster entry in the FAT and knows the next cluster number where the file continues. Now it reads the associated cluster in the data area. After this cluster is also totally read the OS repeats this method until the whole file is read. This way of organizing a file is called the FAT chain.

    FAT entries may contain a few special values to indicate that

    the cluster is free-that is, not in use by a file (0000H for FAT16)
    the cluster contains one or more sectors that are physically damaged and should not be used (FFF7H for FAT16)
    and the cluster is the final cluster in a file (FFF8-FFFFH for FAT16), also called End Of File (EOF)
    But from where does the OS know what files are on the disk and where to find the first cluster of that files? That is the reason for the directory entries which are also stored in the data area. Each directory entry has a size of 32 byte and includes information about the file or directory name, size, first cluster number and its attributes.
     
  8. the Tester

    the Tester Registered Member

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    Hi Kathyhl.

    Your daughter may have lost a few small programs from using Ace Utilities?
    I'm sorry to hear that.
    You may be able to get them back.

    There is a "restore" button at the top of the program console.
    If you lost the programs because of registry cleaning you can undo that with that button.
    All backup files in Ace Utilities are listed by date.
    If you know the date of the cleaning,you can restore(undo)the whole backup file for that date.
    You can have more than one file for a particular date if you cleaned more than once that day.

    When you use Ace Utilities to remove junk files you can use an option to send removed files to Recycle Bin.
    You find that under Options button(top of program console)>Junk File Removal>Removal.
    I use that option and then leave that stuff in Recycle Bin for at least a few days in case Ace removes something that is needed.
    Delete Permanently is another option.I don't know which setting is the default when Ace is installed.

    I hope this helps you.
     
  9. Kathyhl

    Kathyhl Registered Member

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    Thank you Spydespiser for all your input. :D Quite a bit of that information I was unaware of!

    The Tester: I knew I read somewhere about that restore button and I have just called my daughter and told her ;). I think what was throwing me off was while I was cleaning her pc I read on the bottom that all items would be sent to the recycle bin, but then it's really apparent that I put them someplace else. I tend to try and be more careful when I work on her pc, but with mine I put them all in my recycle bin, which I won't clean for a few weeks until I have time to use my pc as much as possible. Thank you for your response, now I know for sure I didn't lose any programs for her :).
     
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