Questions I did not find answers for in the manual

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Ulla, Apr 13, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Ulla

    Ulla Guest

    I have just bought Acronis True Image 8.0, I have read the manual but there are some things that I find a bit confusing. Maybe someone here can help me. Acronis is the first backup/imaging software I have had and I am no specialist on computers. I have a computer with one hard drive divided in two partitions, C: with Windows XP and programs installed on it, and O: for storing files. Both are primary partitions. I have an external USB2/firewire hard drive on which I am planning to store the Acronis image files.

    Questions:

    1. If I am to restore C:, should I set the partition type to primary or active? Or can I select both primary and active? Quoting the manual:

    “But if you are to are to restore a system partition, you should select the Primary type for it. Finally, if you want to load an operating system from it, select Active as well. Selecting Active for a partition without an installed operating system could prevent your PC from booting”

    I am totally at loss here.

    2. When I am assigning a drive letter to the restored partition the manual says you can assign any “unused” letter, but what do I do if I still want my system partition to be called C:? Or will C: be recognised as an unused letter as soon as I say that C: is the location I want to restore the image to?

    3. Does it make any difference if the restores are made from images of the entire hard drive or from images made of the partitions separately?

    4. As far as I understand it is possible to restore C: from Windows (provided Windows will boot…), please correct me if I am wrong.

    5. Is the bootable CD (or other rescue media) specific to the computer it is created on, or is it possible to create a CD on another computer in case the CD is lost or damaged and the computer it was created on does not boot? And if it is possible to create it on another computer, are there any restrictions, do they need to have the same OS for example?

    6. According to you with experience of this program, are there any problems with large image files? Is it better to split them into several smaller files when they get larger than any special size?

    Thank you in advance to anyone who might help me by answering anything of this

    Ulla
     
  2. jimmytop

    jimmytop Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Posts:
    268
    Location:
    USA
    If you want to restore the MBR, you need to Image and Restore the entire drive including all partition. Images of individual partitions do not include the MBR. Therefore, restoring a single partition image may make the drive unbootable.

    Not correct. You can NOT restore the system partition while using the operating system that is on the system partition. Use the boot CD for such tasks.

    The bootable CD is NOT machine or hardware specific. However keep in mind software licensing restrictions.
     
  3. MiniMax

    MiniMax Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Posts:
    566
    Hej Ulla, lad mig se om jeg kan hjælpe dig...
    Yes, you can select both. The word "Primary" is something of a mistake, since there is (to my knowledge) no such thing as a "Secondary" partition. Instead a non-Primary partition is known as an "Extended" partition. The reason that Extended partitions are needed, is that your harddisk (or rather your PC BIOS) has a maximum limit of 4 Primary partitions on each physical disk. If more than 4 partitions are needed, one of them must be converted into an Extended partition. So far, you still only have 4 partitions, but help is on its way, since an Extended partition can hold a whole list of Logical partitions.

    Typically though, you will not have 3 Primary partitions and 1 Extended partition with a number of Logical partitions - you will just have 1 Primary and 1 Extended partition with all the Logical partitions you need.

    Consider for a moment a situation where you had 3 Primary partitions (P1, P2, and P3), each with a working Operating System installed (Windows 98 for all your gaming needs on P1, Windows XP for serious stuff on P3, and Linux on P3).

    When you power on the PC, which OS is the PC BIOS supposed to load??

    Answer: The Primary partition with the "Active" flag. If no Active Primary partition is found on the first hard disk, check the next hard disk, and the next, and the next until an Active Primary is found (or until there are no more hard disks).

    (note: the Active flag does not work with Extended and Logical partitions, only Primary partitions)

    More info here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partition_(IBM_PC)
    Not sure - I think this "unused letter" rule only applies if you are restoring the image from within Windows. If you do the restore from the Rescue CD, I do not think it applies, so you should have no problems restoring the image to whatever partition you like.

    Note: Partitions do not have drive letters as such. Drive letters are something that Microsoft Operating Systems forces onto its users.
    For non-bootable partitions the answer is "No". But if the partition contains a bootable operating system (and if you want to be able to boot from it after the restore), the answer is "It depends...". If in doubt, image the entire drive and restore the entire drive.
    Pass. Anyone?

    Personally, I prefer to use the Rescure CD instead of restoring onto a live partition.
    You can create it in China if that makes you feel better :) (which is probably where the boxed retail CD is made)
    None that I know of. But if you want to store the images on CD's 650-700 KB is an obvious limit. For DVD's you are supposed to limit each image to 2 GB due to limitations in the ISO file system used on data DVD's.
     
  4. sandokan

    sandokan Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Posts:
    112
    Answer to question #3: You can start the restore process for your system partition from within Windows, however Acronis will reboot your machine to complete the restore as it needs to destroy the partition and load the image (.tib file) in its place. That part is in the Manual though.
     
  5. Ulla

    Ulla Guest

    Thank you (och tack MiniMax) for your helpful and really infomative answers.

    Unfortunately I have discovered that I have the problem with corrupted image files (storing on an external hard drive, Freecom FHD-3 with USB2 and firewire connections, usb and firewire ports on the motherboard, ATI Radeon 9100 IGP) that has been discussed in several other threads here. I have just written to Acronis support about it.

    Ulla
     
  6. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Posts:
    25,885
    Hello Ulla,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    Please create an image of the desired disk (or partition) to the internal drive and check it. If it is ok, copy it to your internal drive and check it after that. If the image is corrupted please do the following:

    - Download and unpack the checksum utility from http://www.acronis.com/files/support/xcsc.zip
    - Run the application and click on the ellipsis sign to browse and select the image on the internal drive;
    - Click on "Start" button and save the MD5 checksum that will be calculated;
    - Perform the same steps with the image on the external drive and get the MD5 checksum of it;
    - Compare checksums and they are different it is likely that the problem is in your external drive.

    If you cannot create good image even on the internal drive please disable all overclocking options (if you have any) and if this doesn't help I could recommend that you check your RAM modules for possible faults.

    Thank you.
    --
    Ilya Toytman
     
  7. Ulla

    Ulla Guest

    Problems with corrupted images

    Hello Ilya

    Thanks for your advice, however now I think I maybe know what the problem is.

    First I made an image of my C: partition (Windows and programs) on the O: partition (where I am storing data), C: and O: are located on the same internal drive. I set the file size to 1,9 GB and two files were created (1,95 and 1,12 GB). Both files were corrupted when I checked.

    I copied the (corrupted) files to my external drive, and run the checksum utility. For one of the files the checksums were the same, for the other file they differed.

    I have no overclocking settings (wouldn’t even dream of it), on the contrary my processor tends to “underclock”. Fsb is set to “auto” in BIOS. Since I have a 3 GHz processor it should boot at 200x15=3 GHz, but for some reason I don’t know it often decides to boot at 166x15, giving me a 2,5 GHz processor. I discovered this very recently when I had to reinstall Windows for the first time in my life (I learned a lot about computers then that I have never had any wish to know). I found out that this was rather common on this model, Shuttle ST62K. I also read somewhere that setting the fsb to 200 didn’t help, but that if one hits the reset button during POST the computer restarts with the right front bus speed. I also read in a thread here earlier today that the memory speed (?) should be a multiple of the fsb (400 = 2x200) so I thought that maybe there is nothing wrong with the memory, it just doesn’t communicate correctly with the processor.

    So I rebooted, pressed the reset button and got a 3 GHz processor and made a new image of C: onto my internal drive. Verified the image and it was OK. I then copied the image to my external drive, and the copy also verified OK. And the checksums were the same.

    I have now also made an image of my entire internal drive directly to my external drive (splitted in 1,9 GB sized files), and they are all OK when I check them.

    So probably I don’t have a faulty memory. I have seen in other threads (“corrupt image from 3 partitions to a 4th” for instance) that something called memtest could be used for this, but it seems terribly complicated to me, being just an average user, not a computer expert.

    Does this make sense? Do you think it could be the incorrect fsb that is the problem?

    Ulla
     
  8. Ulla

    Ulla Guest

    And two questions about incremental images:

    1. If I make incremental images and one turns out to be corrupted (if I check immedeately when I have created it), can I just delete delete it and make a new incremental image?

    2. If I am to restore and have one full backup and several incremental images, and one of the incremental images is corrupted, can I then make a restore including the full backup and all the incremental images made before the corrupted one?

    Ulla
     
  9. MiniMax

    MiniMax Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Posts:
    566
    Re: Problems with corrupted images

    Huh? I have never heard that RAISING your system clock would allow you to create error-free images o_O Unless of course your memory decided to asynchronously (200 MHz x 2) compared to the CPU running at (166 MHz x 15). I would expect the memory to run synchronously at 166 MHz x 2 = 333 MHz (as do mine, even though they are rated for 400 MHz, but my CPU slows me down).

    Oh well - you got a valid image, and that is what counts.

    In addition to the TI checks, did you also try to explore it with TI?

    From what I have read here, you do not qualify as an "average user" :) and should have no problems with creating a boot-CD with MemTest 86+. You download the ISO-image with the latest and greatest version of MemTest 86+, launch your favorite CD-burning program, and transfer the ISO-image to the CD (make it a CD-RW until you are sure the process works). Leave the CD in the drive, reboot, and MemTest 86+ boots from the CD. From there, just follow the instructions on the screen (but do it late at night, just before you go to sleep, because a complete test takes several hours and is about as exiting as watching grass grow).
    I think so, but I do not have a version of TI that can do incrementals. For TI to make incremental backups, it compares the disk against the backup image(s), sector by sector. If you delete a corrupt image, should not be aware that it have just made an incremental, and will go through the exact same comparision process as before - hopefully resulting in a a valid image this time.
    I think so, but I do not have a version of TI that can do incrementals. It would not make sense for TI to insist on using every single incremental since the full backup. Btw - if you delete the image, how would TI ever know that it ever existed? Where would that information be stored?
     
  10. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
    This is one thing I haven't seen addressed yet and I'm a bit curious. ... Isn't there problems with using TI with Firewire? I could of sworn that I read something about this somewhere. Although I could of been dreaming. I have been researching TI for days now.

    Soooooo...Is it true or am I crazy? (if I'm way off, a simple "you're crazy" response will suffice)

    .
     
  11. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    3,329
    Location:
    San Rafael, CA
    You're crazy. :)
     
  12. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
  13. MiniMax

    MiniMax Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Posts:
    566
    Semi-crazy. Sometime the Rescue version of TI 6.0 will hang during the "Analyzing drives" phase, and I will have to recycle my external Maxtor OneTouch II and reboot.
     
  14. Ulla

    Ulla Guest

    I hope I have figured out how to make quotes, otherwise this post will look horrible...
    I think that is exactly what happens. If I look in setup it says "Now DDR frequency 400MHz = Dual Channel", the setting for memory frequency is "Auto".
    I don't remember if I tried to explore the images that veryfied correctly, but I had no problems exploring the corrupted ones. I have even tried to boot from the rescue CD to to be sure that I could find the files on my external drive that way.
    I am flattered :) but my ambition is to be just an "average user". I hate leaving Windows environment, and get nervous for simple things like entering setup and change boot device from hard drive to CD. But I am learning. Thank you for your description of how to use memtest anyway. It sounds easy enough the way you describe it.
    Well, I thoght maybe when you create an incremental TI makes an addition to the previous incremental (or the full backup) telling it in what file it should look for more infomation...
    I think I read somewhere about someone who couldn't get valid images with USB, but had no problems with firewire. I haven't tried firewire with processor frequency matching memory frequency yet.
     
  15. mareke

    mareke Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Posts:
    200
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    I've had no problems making images setting a limit of 4GB (or more-up to about 4.4GB which is around the limit of data DVDs will hold) and burning them to DVD by choosing the DVD-ROM(UDF) option in Nero.
     
  16. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
    I just bought a 10 pack of 4.7GB DVD+R discs. ($5 on ebay) I hope that I can utilize all the gigs from these discs without using 3rd party software. Having one disc to keep track of is enough.
    I'm the type that stomps around the house yelling "Where's my damn glassess?!" Only to find out that they're on top of my head. :rolleyes:

    Sooooo...If I have 4gigs of data to backup can I get it on one disc, or do I have to download a software program like mareke uses; Nero?
     
  17. Tatou

    Tatou Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Posts:
    150
  18. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
    Thanks Tatou. It's a very good "how to" description. It was so good that I'm posting the direct link for other DVD+R, DVD+RW, and DVD-RW users. ...
    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/faq.html#20

    I'm still worried about going over the recommended amount of gigs when writting/imaging the backup to disc. I wish that I could test it on my trial version, but then I wouldn't need the full version would I? I guess I have to trust the advice you guys give me. *sigh* ;)

    One last newbie question: You used the term "50c" when describing the DVD's I have. What does that mean? (no laughing! I've never bought blank discs before) http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/confused/1/confused24.gif
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2005
  19. Tatou

    Tatou Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Posts:
    150
    I think you can make images with the test version and verify but you can't restore.
    MiniMax might know.

    By 50c I meant inexpensive, cheap i.e $5/10 = 50c. I would use the best brand disks which may be more expensive but more reliable.
     
  20. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
    Oh. I thought it was another one of those damn tech term that go "WOOOOSH!" over my head. lol

    The reason I mentioned that I got them cheap on eBay was because I was a little ashamed of myself for not getting RW discs. Stupid, but they were cheap.

    However, They seem to be high quality 16x discs. The brand name is Verbatim and it says "Advanced AZO" on the box. Does that mean anything to you?
    The box also says that they are "Barcoded Singles Ideal for Resale". And each disc is packed in it's very own "high quality" slim case. With all of that how could I not be impressed? Wow! lol
    Anyhoo...Are these good discs or should I go out and by different ones? And what brand would you recommend?

    Thanks,
    Søul
     
  21. MiniMax

    MiniMax Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Posts:
    566
    Verbatim sounds good to me. Generally, any disc where the manufacturer (Verbatim, Sony, TDK, Phillips, Memorex, Kodak, ..) is okay with having the company name stamped on the disc should be okay.

    You can (I think) restore with the trial version - except for the system partition and from the Rescue CD.

    About wasting space - why not just create each sub-image with size = 1.5 GB ? 3 such images will fit nicely on a 4.7 GB DVD, and will be smaller that the fabled 2 GB.
     
  22. mrtee

    mrtee Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Posts:
    61
    I create the image in CD size chunks then burn 6 of those to a DVD.

    The mastering software that I use is from www.sonic.com "MyDvd Studio Deluxe v6". By the way, Sonic now owns Roxio. RecordNow & DLA (packet writing) from Sonic in MyDVD Studio are very easy to use and have dual layer burning built in.
     
  23. S?ul

    S?ul Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Posts:
    29
    Thanks MiniMax. I think the old brain is starting to understand now. Instead of making one huge file, break it up into smaller ones. It's so obvious I'm embarrassed. :oops:

    mrtee - I also have Sonic Record Now, but I didn't know that it could be used to format a DVD to be bootable. I only have the basic version, but they're offering discounted updates to current users. Updates are from $30 to $100. More money! *SIGH* :doubt:

    -
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.