Protected mode for Internet Explorer?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Rilla927, Aug 11, 2010.

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  1. Rilla927

    Rilla927 Registered Member

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    Internet options has protected mode checked or on but when I open the browser and look at the bottom right of page it says it's off. Has anyone come across this?

    Also, I noticed there is no option to upgrade to IE8. I remember the browser asking and I said "ask me later" and I haven't seen it since and no option in windows updates. I have Vista 32bit.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  2. Sadeghi85

    Sadeghi85 Registered Member

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    UAC is turned off??
     
  3. wearetheborg

    wearetheborg Registered Member

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    What is protected mode? Is it available in XP? For all programs?
     
  4. Rilla927

    Rilla927 Registered Member

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    Thanks Sadeghi85,

    I guess I will have to correct that.
     
  5. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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  6. stapp

    stapp Global Moderator

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    I think the only way I could understand that Sully would be to read it while I was drunk.

    Then I would have a valid excuse for not remembering it the next day :D
     
  7. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Then we have to translate it into ports and protocols.

    Port 1 = low integrity level
    Port 2 = medium integrity level
    Port 3 = high integrity level

    When you force only communications on Port 1, the ICMP is the protocol used, and it is used for simple tasks which don't have much chance to cause issues. You engage this and don't worry anymore, but you lose a lot of features because this protocol is limited.

    When you force communications on Port 2, it is TCP protocol. It is routeable but controllable. You need to keep an eye on it, but you can expect and predict its traffic pattern.

    When you force communications on Port 3, it is using UDP protocol. Lack of routing but its wide broadcast pattern mean it might go everywhere, and you need to micro-manage it to keep it under your thumb.

    Umm, sorry I didn't fit in remote and local ports there, erm, or direction, ahem, :oops: or some other key things that are in your speciality.. but I did try o_O lol. Maybe the integrity level of "system" could be considered a raw socket :argh:

    Sul.
     
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